Australian cricket has finally gone around the bend

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Ed Cowan. (AAP Image/Julian Smith).

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The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results.

Well let it be known that the 2nd of March was the day that the Australian cricket selectors completely and utterly lost their collective marbles.

Cricket selectors have become the sporting equivalent of Kevin Rudd’s Prime Ministership, as John Inverarity and his ‘kitchen cabinet’ continues to make Test squad selections on-the-run.

There is no long term plan in Australian cricket. Rather, there is a culture of change to appease the masses and deflect attention.

While it worked for Rudd and his government for two and a half years, Australian cricket should have learned that when this tactic goes wrong and people realise the fiasco, confidence dissipates as quickly as a puddle in the Simpson desert.

The debacle in Hyderabad while also reflective of the squad is also a telling example of the failure of the new guard of Australian cricket to get the house in order before the Ashes.

The continued playing of batsmen out of their positions is costing cheap wickets and denting confidence.

Phillip Hughes needs to be moved back to opener or dropped from the squad as he is way out of depth at number three.

The continued tinkering and rotation in the hope that the team can survive with multiple changes each Test is an abject failure.

Just look at the second test for example.

While Glenn Maxwell was a welcome addition to the squad on a spin-friendly surface, the replacement of Nathan Lyon was a show of panic in the ranks.

Nathan Lyon’s removal from the team was staggering considering his all-round performance in the first Test.

While his figures in the first innings were not the greatest (3-215 off 47 overs), the three wickets were pearlers and did momentarily along with Pattinson turn the tide.

Add to that a partnership with Moses Henriques his efforts, while in vain, were more encouraging than some other members of the team who kept their place.

However the more important question to be asked was why was Lyon’s replacement Xavier Doherty?

I have nothing against Doherty but considering he has not had one chance since the 2010/2011 Ashes, what has changed in the six weeks on tour?

His figures in the second Test show that he is a very good ODI and 20/20 bowler, who can keep the run rate down.

Test cricket however is a different kettle of fish were wickets are golden. He has shown he cannot deliver.

It’s ironic that the current hierarchy in Baggy Green HQ will approach their two and a half year anniversary after the Ashes, which was about the same time-frame as when Kevin Rudd’s government began to crack.

If the current ‘plan’ falls apart after England, is there a Gillard in the wings who is willing to be decisive?

(Please no comments on how bad Gillard is as my description is merely a metaphor).

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