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Who can replace Brad Haddin when he steps down?

Matthew Wade has made it back into the Aussie side, and should stay until the Ashes. (AFP Photo/William West)
Roar Guru
7th January, 2015
3

I know it is an unpleasant way to look at the current bunch of Australian cricketers, but many of them are starting to near towards their expiry date.

Many people have publicised the likes of the next batting and bowling prospects, so I’m going to buck the trend and examine the possible candidates for the next wicketkeeper, once 37-year-old Brad Haddin steps down.

Matthew Wade (Victoria)

Why
Wade is the most experienced glovesman on the international stage out of all of the candidates, with Test centuries and several caps next to his name. He is also a mainstay for the one day team when Haddin can’t play, as he is also captain of his state. Wade is a strong bat and can play up at six, which was proven in 2012 when he scored a century against Sri Lanka at the SCG.

Why not
Even though Wade has played plenty of international cricket, he is known for being a sloppy glovesman. Wade has dropped plenty of catches, as they are mostly in tight situations. Just take a look at him ducking away from the ball in the recent Big Bash League game between the Stars and Renegades. His batting is aggressive and busy, but after a few years out of the Test team he has not improved his first class batting nor keeping.

Tim Paine (Tasmania)

Why
In my eyes, Paine is an ideal choice. He is hitting his peak form as a wicketkeeper at 30 years of age, as he has played a few Test matches for Australia in the past. He is well renowned in Australia and is a slick keeper, with skills that far surpass Wade behind the stumps. Paine also has the ability to bat anywhere in a batting line up, as he has batted high and at number seven for his state and country.

Why not
Numerous injuries have derailed Paine for long periods of time. It is unknown whether a new injury will occur or whether an old one will resurface and he will have lengthy stints outside the boundary line. He doesn’t have much experience recently at international level and seems to have been forgotten by selectors after injuries. To me though, Tim Paine is the man for the job for a couple of years.

Sam Whiteman (Western Australia)

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Why
Whiteman is only 22 and is firing well. He is a clean keeper and has taken some brilliant catches. He has also batted particularly well, being able to fill in the number seven position with ease. Whiteman also has experience as the lead keeper for Western Australia and the Perth Scorchers, as he has kept to the fierce bowling of Mitchell Johnson at the bouncy WACA pitch.

Why not
For all of his prospects and talent, Whiteman is still only a young man. He hasn’t played enough first class cricket and he has had no international experience. Whiteman is the man who should take over from Paine in a few years, as he has time on his side to entrench himself in the Western Australian line-up.

Chris Hartley (Queensland)

Why
Hartley has been plugging away at stave level for many years. He has gathered a huge total of dismissals and is known as one of the cleanest keepers in our land. He has had plenty of experience in many years of first class cricket and can definitely perform with the bat.

Why not
Hartley’s main problem is that he has appeared to have missed the boat. At the age of 32 it is not much use putting him in if he only has a couple of years left. The only way that Hartley could be picked is if he can perform into his late thirties, but that is a rare feat for keepers. Hartley also lacks international experience and it is unknown how he would cope with such scrutiny on him.

Peter Nevill (New South Wales)

Why
Nevill has been Haddin’s understudy for several years in New South Wales, and he has surely picked up many different tricks from Australia’s number one keeper. His batting is also exceptional, as he is a smooth keeper who performs honestly with his heart on his sleeve.

Why not
For many years Nevill hasn’t been able to keep in the wake of Haddin returning to New South Wales. He has zero experience on the international stage and he still hasn’t completely proven himself at state level, although a few years of great results could change our perception of him.

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Honourable mentions
Peter Handscomb (Victoria)
Ryan Carters (New South Wales)
Tim Ludeman (South Australia)
Ben Dunk (Tasmania)

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