The Roar
The Roar

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Less is more for Federer ahead of 2018 season

Roger Federer's victory at Wimbledon has once again elevated him into the history books. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP Images )
31st December, 2017
0

Federer remains a giant of the sport at age 36, winning two grand slam titles in a dream 2017, including the Australian Open.

But after spending most of 2016 on the sidelines with a career-threatening knee injury, Federer knows he needs to take it easy with his body.

Federer injured his knee while running a bath for his twins, and he knows he might be just one more serious injury away from having his career ended.

But for the moment he has no thoughts of retirement.

Instead, he is eyeing off more grand slam success, and he believes the key to achieving that is by training smarter, instead of harder.

“Through the injury I sustained here in Australia a couple of years ago, my mindset has changed,” Federer said.

“I probably work less, with even more quality. So it gives me more time off.

“Essentially I’m working half days if you like, because there’s no point for me to put in all the mega hours anymore, because I know I have it in the vault, I have it there if need be

“That’s why I think it was very important for me to prove to myself at the Australian Open this year – to win those three five setters that I had. (And also win) the two five-setters I had at the US Open.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“I won all the big matches when it came down to the crunch. I know I can do it, and it’s important to stay injury free.”

Federer made a perfect start to his Hopman Cup campaign with a 6-4 6-3 win over Japan’s Yuichi Sugita.

Switzerland went on to win the tie 3-0, and they’ll be back in action on Tuesday night when they take on Russia at Perth Arena.

Federer will face off against Karen Khachanov, with former world No.7 Belinda Bencic to take on Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova.