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Corporate Australia can transform grassroots sport

Patrick Walker Roar Guru

By Patrick Walker, Patrick Walker is a Roar Guru New author!

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    Sport is part of the Aussie DNA and is at the heart of every community, but now it’s time for corporate Australia to show its corporate social responsibility (CSR) credentials for grassroots sport.

    For parents, weekends are spent ferrying kids, friends and teammates to local sports grounds. Monday coffee and watercooler time is where the weekend’s games are analysed and dissected. There are winners and losers, but we are united by a love of sport.

    The AFL and NRL grand finals, Australian Open tennis final, State of Origin games and the Melbourne Cup continue to be among the most watched TV programs year in and year out.

    Yet despite our love for sport, sports participation levels are declining and one in four kids are now overweight or obese. Physical inactivity contributes to 14,000 deaths per year and this inactivity costs the Australian health budget an estimated $1.5 billion every year.

    Our sporting DNA is revealing some deeply disturbing scars which, if not addressed, will potentially undermine our sporting fabric, lead to unhealthier and less inclusive communities, and dilute the number of sports stars of tomorrow.

    Major sporting and entertainment events and stadia investment by governments provide substantial economic benefits, and well-constructed and targeted sports sponsorships continue to deliver measurable marketing benefits for brands.

    But the missing pieces of the puzzle are the human benefits of corporate investment in sport.

    Typically, corporate investment in sport is made through sponsorship which, with some exceptions, tends to be focused on the elite and professional end of sport.

    While this is a fundamental part of our culture, are top-end sports sponsorships changing societies? Does elite sports sponsorship enhance physical and mental health in our community, foster social inclusion, or boost the academic and career outcomes of our young people?

    Local Australian Rules Football

    (Photo: Flickr user Alpha)

    As a society, we are genuinely touched by the vast number of charitable campaigns which are usually borne out of tragedy or sorrow, or to right a societal wrong. All are very worthy causes.

    But what is corporate Australia doing to demonstrate its corporate social responsibility to grassroots and community sport, and to the rusted-on love of sport their employees, clients and customers show every week?

    These employees, clients and customers are the same time-poor volunteers who are happily on BBQ duties cooking the sausages and onions to make a few dollars for their local grassroots club so they can purchase new shirts, balls or training equipment for the season ahead.

    They are the same parents who are flogging chocolates to friends and work colleagues to help their son or daughter travel to the upcoming regional or interstate championship.

    It’s time for corporate Australia to step up and proudly showcase its CSR credentials and directly engage with their employees, clients and customers in a genuine, meaningful way. It’s time for corporate Australia to help heal our growing sports DNA scars.

    Further, it’s time for corporate Australia to seriously consider the brand, leadership and community opportunities that are provided by an investment in grassroots and community sport.

    As the only sports body with Deductible Gift Recipient (DGR) status, the Australian Sports Foundation can provide a tax deduction for donations to sports clubs, sports projects and national or state representative athletes.

    Whether through a matched giving program, that doubles the impact of the investment, or via workplace giving, donating to grassroots and community sport gives corporate Australia a chance to make a meaningful impact in the lives of the people it values most.

    And, importantly, corporate and private donations are tax-deductible when pledged via the Sports Foundation – a very attractive proposition.

    By responding to community sporting needs, that impacts employees, clients and customers, a sports CSR program is not merely a straight hand-out, but is instead is a real corporate-community partnership which makes a meaningful contribution at a grassroots level and effects genuine change.

    Sport brings people together and is proven to have the power to inspire and engage diverse communities. As Nelson Mandela said, “Sport has the power to change the world. It has the power to inspire. It has the power to unite people in a way that little else does. It speaks to youth in a language they understand.”

    Nelson Mandela hands the William Webb Ellis Trophy to Francois Pienaar

    (AFP photo/Jean-Pierre Muller)

    Sports sponsorship and new stadia invariably deliver a return on investment.

    But a tax effective CSR partnership between corporate Australia and the Sports Foundation will help build a healthier, more active and more inclusive Australia.

    Patrick Walker is the CEO of the Australian Sports Foundation. For further information about the Australian Sports Foundation, go to sportsfoundation.org.au.

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    The Crowd Says (55)

    • February 14th 2018 @ 7:49am
      greg said | February 14th 2018 @ 7:49am | ! Report

      It would be fair to argue that declining sports participation levels are impacting sport attendances and TV ratings.

      If the current generation of kids and young adults are playing less sport, and are showing less interest, why would they attend games or watch on TV?

      There is only so much money Governments can allocate to sport. So it is fair and reasonable that corporate Australia invests money (and get a tax deduction to boot!) into local communities for sport. Afterall, local communities are their customer base.

    • February 14th 2018 @ 9:19am
      AD said | February 14th 2018 @ 9:19am | ! Report

      I kind of stopped reading at “corporate social responsibility”.

      Sure, we’ll send all of your jobs off-shore leaving vast numbers of people to struggle with unemployment or insecure short term / casual / freelance employment without any basic entitlements like paid leave etc. But hey, we’re socially responsible because we chucked less than we spent on catering at our last board meeting into a local footy club.

      • February 14th 2018 @ 9:26am
        Oingo Boingo said | February 14th 2018 @ 9:26am | ! Report

        This site loves a morality story.

    • February 14th 2018 @ 9:37am
      mattyb said | February 14th 2018 @ 9:37am | ! Report

      Why is it a corporate responsibility to help sport if sporting clubs aren’t willing to help themselves.
      How many local clubs allocate money to buying senior players rather than developing junior talent?
      How many local clubs are about the now rather than the future?

      The responsibility lays with sports clubs to look after their sports at all levels rather than focusing purely on the elite level.

      Corporations to already help sport through sponsorship,the problem is how the sporting organisations are choosing to use that money.

      • Roar Guru

        February 14th 2018 @ 12:31pm
        Penster said | February 14th 2018 @ 12:31pm | ! Report

        How many local clubs allocate money to buying senior players rather than developing junior talent?
        How many local clubs are about the now rather than the future?

        The responsibility lays with sports clubs to look after their sports at all levels rather than focusing purely on the elite level.

        mattyb you’ve just described entire industries in Australia, offshoring jobs and importing foreigners to do “our” jobs because we haven’t bothered actually training anyone. I’d prefer the corporates look after the workers, and the clubs look after the players.

      • April 30th 2018 @ 1:21pm
        staceys said | April 30th 2018 @ 1:21pm | ! Report

        I would consider it less of a corporate responsibility and more that of a community responsibility.

        Ideally funding for SSO’s, state leagues and championships should sit in the corporate or SME market however, local clubs should really be benefitting from community sponsorships in their local area.

        The problem is that as Patrick mentioned that the ‘same old volunteers are fundraising and running the committee’ this is true – but again local businesses arent seeing the same value in sponsoring the local footy team like they used to.

        Clubs need to invest in dedicated sponsorship teams with people capable of managing sponsorship fulfilment along with adding new assets into their offerings like social media and video content.

        Having a logo on the jersey and holding a function once a year for a $5K commitment is becoming less valuable since the turnover in volunteer run associations is so high.

        Develop a team managing the sponsorships instead of leaving it up to the committee and invest in strategic marketing and digital asset creation.

    • February 14th 2018 @ 9:49am
      Perry Bridge said | February 14th 2018 @ 9:49am | ! Report

      I would have thought that sponsorships of the introductory programs – such as NAB (Auskick), Milo (In2Cricket), Aldi (MiniRoos) etc etc – these help create a co-ordinated and cost effective program for parents to run as volunteers. Without the sponsorship then the cost would be much greater and the capacity to organise and deliver such programs would be far more ad-hoc in nature.

      Sports participation is interesting – AFL for example in the last 5 years has almost doubled – mainly via helping facilitate school programs/comps (esp NSW/QLD) and via the increase in female participation. Rugby Union has finally cottoned on to intro programs and it’s ‘Game On’ program has got off to a decent start in 2015 and doubled it’s numbers in 2016 (over 54K participants). The NRL has nutted out that female participation is worth a focus now too. There’s a wind of change blowing through. Just where a sport like netball will sit afterward remains to be seen.

    • February 14th 2018 @ 10:25am
      I ate pies said | February 14th 2018 @ 10:25am | ! Report

      It’s a reflection of the changing in our society. Just go to any local gym after school hours now – it’s full of narcissistic kids lifting weights who would have in previous generations been at footy training, or cricket training. It’s truly scary.
      Then there’s the complete focus on the feminisation of our society. Boys are now expected to play every sport in mixed teams; this invariably lowers the level of competition and the girls are always favoured. It’s a naive view to think that the boys don’t notice this and have a lessening desire to play. Why would they want to when they’re continually overlooked and having to play with team members who don’t want to try? Then there’s the coaches who celebrate mediocrity. Again, this is fine for girls but it’s putting boys off playing sports. I’ve seen it with my own eyes.

      • Roar Guru

        February 14th 2018 @ 10:44am
        AdelaideDocker said | February 14th 2018 @ 10:44am | ! Report

        There’s a lot to unpack here, but I will hesitantly, and partially, agree with the first bit. I’ve seen the narcissism from some of the regular gym goers, and it kind of is scary.

        But that second paragraph is just hysteria to a whole new level. I will admit I’ve not played club sport or the like, but from everything I’ve heard and seen, ‘mixed teams’ are not a regular feature throughout sports. I’ve honestly never seen mixed cricket/footy/soccer/volleyball etc. teams. Of course, I may be wrong, but I’m not sure this happens.

        Coaches celebrating mediocrity, though: I can believe that. It happens everywhere these days, and it’s a reflection of society that is too concerned about not insulting kids. It’s frustrating, but I don’t think it’s at the point where it’s irrevocably effecting the attitudes of boys in sports.

        • February 14th 2018 @ 1:08pm
          I ate pies said | February 14th 2018 @ 1:08pm | ! Report

          Do you have kids Adelaide? Do they play junior sport each week? I do. I see it every week.

          • Roar Guru

            February 14th 2018 @ 4:58pm
            AdelaideDocker said | February 14th 2018 @ 4:58pm | ! Report

            Still a little while off kids, ihp.

            Whilst you were speaking as, presumably, a father, I was speaking from the pov of someone who is the same age as a lot of people in club sports/school sports. I don’t see nor hear much of this supposed “feminisation” of sports.

            Each to their own, though.

            • February 16th 2018 @ 11:25am
              I ate pies said | February 16th 2018 @ 11:25am | ! Report

              Let me clarify then – I’m talking specifically about junior sports. That is the time that they get hooked on playing, or lost to the game.
              The reasons for separating senior sports are obvious.

      • February 14th 2018 @ 10:54am
        Aligee said | February 14th 2018 @ 10:54am | ! Report

        Depends where you send your kids to school, there is a very good reason why private schooling and indeed home schooling is on the rise.

        Parents who have concepts like Safe schools and the like enamoured on them have rejected those concepts that the MSM pushes..

        • Roar Guru

          February 14th 2018 @ 10:58am
          AdelaideDocker said | February 14th 2018 @ 10:58am | ! Report

          Ha, I went to private, religious schools, and it was obligatory to learn all the nitty, gritty facts of the Bible and religion. Without a choice. So I don’t think it’s that bad to be learning safe schools material in public schools; which are in my view much more relevant to modern society than what I learnt in religious schools.

          To-may-to to-mah-to, right?

          • February 14th 2018 @ 11:10am
            Aligee said | February 14th 2018 @ 11:10am | ! Report

            So your parents sent you to a religious private school which i may add are IME not that religious these days and you complain that it was obligatory to learn some religious fundamentals – HUH, funny that!!.

            Many people who are not religious send their kids to private schools because of the increased education and sporting opportunities, they also send their kids there because of the crap, leftist safe schools nonsense that the current Vic Labour Government is serving up.

            Gary Dowsett – google.
            .

            • Roar Guru

              February 14th 2018 @ 11:20am
              AdelaideDocker said | February 14th 2018 @ 11:20am | ! Report

              No, not at all. I’m not religious, but I still went through school learning religion whilst remaining ambivalent. I didn’t care; I accepted that is what I was going to learn anyway.

              I’m just saying with all this outcry over safe schools and the perception that private schools are the answer and immune to any indoctrination of children – they’re not. They’ll force feed kids their religious beliefs – not necessarily a bad thing, just something that is unavoidable.

              Safe Schools is a program about becoming tolerant of LGBT students and the like. It’s important to learn, and it isn’t something which deserves an outcry befitting the arrival of the apocalypse.

              • February 14th 2018 @ 12:16pm
                Aligee said | February 14th 2018 @ 12:16pm | ! Report

                If I had to have a bet I would back man created god rather than the other way round, having said that many of the fundamentals that we live by come from teachings handed down via Christianity and they form the backdrop of who how what and why we are.

                A religious vacuum like we are having in the west is quickly filled by something else!, I myself am not a practising Christian but can see what this vacuum has created.

                If you really think safe schools is about what you think it is about I suggest you dig deeper and research it’s history and who is really behind it pushing, you may be surprised, I would suggest you question whatever naatative the MSM is pushing, ATM you are just repeating it verbatim.

              • Roar Guru

                February 14th 2018 @ 5:12pm
                Paul D said | February 14th 2018 @ 5:12pm | ! Report

                Man did create God. Proof of this was best expressed by Ricky Gervais who said if you destroyed every book about Christianity and then recreated it 1000 years later from scraps of info it’d all be different because the human experience is different.

                Destroy every science book and start trying to piece it together in 1000 years and it’d still all be the same.

                A religious vacuum is usually filled with widespread staggeringly indifferent agnosticism.

                What Roz Ward thinks safe schools is about isn’t what it’s about for most people. She has already worked this out the hard way, and I know that a lot of less hard-nosed types who are more focused on outcomes rather than ideology have been pressing her to take a big step back from her association with the program, because otherwise she’s going to ruin something good for a lot of vulnerable young kids because she can’t set her ego aside.

              • February 14th 2018 @ 5:42pm
                Aligee said | February 14th 2018 @ 5:42pm | ! Report

                You fail to go far enough back to Kevin Jennings, google Gary Dowsett, he was acting director at ARCSHS when safe schools was Australianised and launched, he has published some interesting articles to say the least – “Boiled lollies and Bandaids” – have a guess what he promotes?. Google Joel Radcliffe, he is another, great photos in lounge room!!.

                These are the so called responsible adults that run programs for our kids.

              • Roar Guru

                February 14th 2018 @ 5:56pm
                Paul D said | February 14th 2018 @ 5:56pm | ! Report

                One wonders how much power Dowsett actually has given he wrote that article in 1982 and so far none of it has eventuated.

                I don’t know the others, will have a look. If they’re gender theorists though I agree they’re nuts. Speaking as someone who grew up gay it should just be about minimising bullying and teaching kids to respect other kids, that everyone is different, and don’t attack people for being different. Focus on outcomes for children today and tomorrow, not on an elaborate get square exercise for a bunch of embittered adults with psychological hangups over their own perceived mistreatment as children in the past.

              • February 14th 2018 @ 6:09pm
                Aligee said | February 14th 2018 @ 6:09pm | ! Report

                Its not a matter of how much Power Dowsett has, its more to do with his lifestyle and beliefs!!!, these are the people who are meant to be delivering responsible programs.

                It’s quite clear to me and many others what his ultimate aims are.

                I can tell you no responsible adult would leave their kids within a bulls roar of him.

              • Roar Guru

                February 14th 2018 @ 6:14pm
                Paul D said | February 14th 2018 @ 6:14pm | ! Report

                I wouldn’t either but I certainly wouldn’t be concerned about the Dowsetts of the world, who are open about their proclivities.

                You’re better off being concerned by the Larry Nassars who don’t advertise it and hide behind a cloak of qualifications and implied authority

              • February 14th 2018 @ 6:20pm
                Aligee said | February 14th 2018 @ 6:20pm | ! Report

                That’s true.

        • February 14th 2018 @ 12:48pm
          DB said | February 14th 2018 @ 12:48pm | ! Report

          Safe Schools is an anti-bullying program, nothing more nothing less. It’s not taught as part of the curriculum it’s just a resource to help combat bullying.

          • February 14th 2018 @ 2:36pm
            Aligee said | February 14th 2018 @ 2:36pm | ! Report

            Research my friend is your friend.

          • February 14th 2018 @ 4:58pm
            elvis said | February 14th 2018 @ 4:58pm | ! Report

            Unfortunately in my dealings with school leavers, a lot of them seem to think bullying is being told to do your job properly. Or any kind of trammel on what they want to do.

        • Roar Guru

          February 14th 2018 @ 6:42pm
          Cat said | February 14th 2018 @ 6:42pm | ! Report

          So what exactly is your issue with the Safe Schools program? What was allegedly bad about it, Aligee?

          • February 14th 2018 @ 8:06pm
            Aligee said | February 14th 2018 @ 8:06pm | ! Report

            Ok, when the actual architect of safe schools whose name has been mentioned states … ” ‘I don’t just teach children how to be gay, I teach them how to be gay and communist’.

            Or when another organiser, you can find him on youtube stating that parents cant stop this and should have no say in what their children learn.

            When the director of ARCHS who developed safe schools has published articles such as ; “boiled lollies and bandaids” and identifies the gay movement with kids you start to wonder what actually is the aim of this, was on his resume until recently, so i guess he is pretty proud of it.

            Doesn’t stop there of course but i am not going to link anything, you need to look it up yourself.

            That’s my problem and it is not alleged, they are facts.

      • Roar Pro

        February 14th 2018 @ 12:46pm
        anon said | February 14th 2018 @ 12:46pm | ! Report

        It’s a reflection of the changing in our society. Just go to any local gym after school hours now – it’s full of narcissistic kids lifting weights who would have in previous generations been at footy training, or cricket training. It’s truly scary.

        Too right. The young generation has lost interest in playing sports and to a degree watching sports either live or on TV. They’d rather look good for instagram selfies.

        Then there’s the complete focus on the feminisation of our society. Boys are now expected to play every sport in mixed teams; this invariably lowers the level of competition and the girls are always favoured. It’s a naive view to think that the boys don’t notice this and have a lessening desire to play. Why would they want to when they’re continually overlooked and having to play with team members who don’t want to try? Then there’s the coaches who celebrate mediocrity. Again, this is fine for girls but it’s putting boys off playing sports. I’ve seen it with my own eyes.

        Another elephant in the room is the changing population demographics in Australia.

        Australia’s population grows by 3% each year. Most of that growth is through migration, with the majority of migrants coming from China and India.

        Chinese and Indian migrants have not taken to AFL or League (have you ever seen more than a few at a game?). Indian migrants enjoy the BBL, but I don’t see too many Chinese migrants at cricket games.

        Given that Australia’s demographics will be dominated by people with Indian or Chinese ethnicity in the next 50 years, I don’t see AFL or League growing at all. Interest on declining as young people and new Australians turn their backs on our sports.

        The AFL needs to do something to attract new Australians or it risks becoming irrelevant in its own country over the next 50 years.

        Instead of ridiculous forays into China or Hong Kong, focus on home.

        • Roar Guru

          February 14th 2018 @ 3:35pm
          Paul D said | February 14th 2018 @ 3:35pm | ! Report

          So you’re saying that given Australia is going to be dominated by Chinese migrants in 50 years it’s really stupid the AFL goes to China to try and educate them about the game

          Not sure you consider the giant gaping logical fallacies in your arguments before you write them anon, not that they make a great deal of sense anyway, but you could at least try and make some effort

          • Roar Pro

            February 14th 2018 @ 4:08pm
            anon said | February 14th 2018 @ 4:08pm | ! Report

            Chinese migrants in Australia have little interest in AFL.

            Bit of a stretch to think you’ll convert Chinese in China when the AFL can barely convert people in NSW and QLD to AFL.

            • Roar Guru

              February 14th 2018 @ 5:45pm
              Paul D said | February 14th 2018 @ 5:45pm | ! Report

              “Chinese migrants in Australia have little interest in AFL.”

              Ok but

              “Instead of ridiculous forays into China or Hong Kong, focus on home.”

              presumably only on white, anglo-saxon fans, or something

              You wonder why I ridicule you instead of debating you, contradictory statements like that are a big part of it

              Also, while you’re talking about what a waste of time it is, the business community is getting right on with things, as they usually do when there’s the waft of money to be made on the horizon

              http://www.afr.com/business/afl-doubles-down-in-shanghai-with-help-from-cattle-investor-20171024-gz75r3

              Considering most of the money to fund this is coming from chinese investors or various commercial interests (i recall 4 and 20 are onboard too as part of their push to internationalise their pies) I don’t see how your usual miserliness with AFL spending can get a run here, because the AFL aren’t the ones putting the money up here

            • Roar Pro

              February 14th 2018 @ 10:07pm
              anon said | February 14th 2018 @ 10:07pm | ! Report

              No contradiction.

              You are the one projecting thinking “home” means white people.

              The AFL wants to take AFLx to Hong Kong.

              The AFL has had similar delusional forays into NZ, South Africa, UK, America back in the 80’s. Few years ago it was a pre-season match in Dubai.

              Every AFL CEO wants to the one to crack it internationally but they can’t even crack it nationally.

              • Roar Guru

                February 15th 2018 @ 10:39am
                Paul D said | February 15th 2018 @ 10:39am | ! Report

                Golly anon, if I am projecting it’s only because I’ve seen you go down the racialism path so many times on this place – maybe you’ve forgotten some of the trash you used to write on the football tab, not sure others have.

                Anyways, you’re just doing your usual bit of “I don’t have an alternative idea but whatever is being proposed is stupid” – good luck to you

        • Roar Guru

          February 14th 2018 @ 5:00pm
          AdelaideDocker said | February 14th 2018 @ 5:00pm | ! Report

          The Chinese are coming to Australia and aren’t liking our game, so the stupid thing to do is try and modify our game for Chinese populations in CHINA ITSELF.

          Logic, not even once.

      • Roar Guru

        February 14th 2018 @ 12:57pm
        Paul D said | February 14th 2018 @ 12:57pm | ! Report

        “I only put up with you people on here because it gives me a break from work. I don’t really care about any of your opinions nor am I particularly interested in debating the intricacies of something that’s just a bit of fun at the end of the day. ”

        Maybe you should go back to work instead of taxing your feeble intellect with such weighty issues beyond your control. It must be so hard for you trying to believe society is slowly ‘degrading’ in front of your eyes, when in fact it’s just onwards and upwards and leaving you behind

        • February 14th 2018 @ 1:12pm
          I ate pies said | February 14th 2018 @ 1:12pm | ! Report

          You can’t handle people having a different opinion to you can you? Try some critical thinking Paul, it might enlighten you. It’s certainly a better look than hurling insults at those who disagree with you.

          • Roar Guru

            February 14th 2018 @ 2:27pm
            Paul D said | February 14th 2018 @ 2:27pm | ! Report

            But it’s so much fun watching you cry foul

    • Roar Guru

      February 14th 2018 @ 12:50pm
      Paul D said | February 14th 2018 @ 12:50pm | ! Report

      The key issue with this is surely green space and access to playing areas (not even official, with goal posts etc – even just community parks going forward)

      And not a pitiful little patch of green on a corner block with a rotunda and a bbq – I mean a large park, with big trees, and room to kick a footy etc without having to fight for space with the PT’s, yoga, dog-walkers, eco-gardeners and everyone else who wants to use increasingly small amounts of green space in our major cities

      If Corporate Australia is serious about spouting their credentials with regard sports they’d purchase large tracts of land and reserve it from development in all the major cities and ensure it remains free for sporting field use and community sport/participation activities in perpetuity. That would actually get some skin in the game, as opposed to sponsoring yet another crappy organic food festival or some such window dressing

      • Roar Guru

        February 14th 2018 @ 12:54pm
        AdelaideDocker said | February 14th 2018 @ 12:54pm | ! Report

        I hadn’t thought about it that way before now, but yes, that’s a really good idea. An increasingly vital idea going forward, as well.

        Good comment.

      • Roar Guru

        February 14th 2018 @ 2:13pm
        Mango Jack said | February 14th 2018 @ 2:13pm | ! Report

        Agree that the lack of green space is an issue but I don’t think this can or should be solved by corporate purchasing land. It’s mostly a planning issue. We’ve allowed developers to dictate our planning laws so that BA space is available for public use. Banning developers form political donations was a good start but we need strict, enforceable planning laws that are to the benefit of everyone, not just Mirvac and co.

      • February 14th 2018 @ 2:53pm
        Tommo said | February 14th 2018 @ 2:53pm | ! Report

        Paul D. Don’t know wher you live but in the Perth metro area 10% of all residential land must be parks or sporting reserves. Seems that ever street has an oval that is used for football/cricket. The hard cricket pitch covered with thick rubber each football season. Was in the USA recently. Try finding open parkland their for a run. Near on impossible.

        • Roar Guru

          February 14th 2018 @ 3:01pm
          Paul D said | February 14th 2018 @ 3:01pm | ! Report

          I’m in Brisbane – it’s not too bad here, although becoming more of an issue in the inner city as you’d expect

          A lot of sporting clubs are really struggling in cash flow terms, and it makes them vulnerable to being sold or preyed upon by developers. Brisbane City Council isn’t showing a lot of interest in assisting many of these clubs who are on BCC leases with their finances. It’s not necessarily doomsday, but the attitude and perceived indifference is a concern, I feel

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