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David Warner announces his response to Cricket Australia's ball-tampering sanctions

5th April, 2018
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It's time for the media to leave David Warner alone. (Photo by Ashley Vlotman/Gallo Images/Getty Images)
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5th April, 2018
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David Warner has finally revealed whether he’ll be appealing his suspension from Cricket Australia in the wake of the ball-tampering incident.

Despite being touted as the most likely of the three players involved in the scandal to appeal his sentence, the former vice-captain has followed in the footsteps of Steve Smith and Cameron Bancroft by opting to accept the sanctions, saying he is “truly sorry” for his actions and will now work towards being a “better person, teammate and role model.”

The decision to accept the punishment means Warner will not play cricket for Australia in the next 12 months, nor will he be permitted to turn out in the Sheffield Shield, Big Bash and domestic one-day tournament during the same period. He has also been barred from ever holding a leadership position in an Australian cricket team again.

Like Warner, Steve Smith was also handed a 12-month playing ban, but his leadership suspension is only for a further 12 months, as opposed to Warner’s permanent one.

Bancroft was given a leaner nine-month playing suspension.

The decisions of all three players to accept the sanctions has spared them and Cricket Australia of heading to an appeals process, one which could have continued to damage the sport’s reputation following the ball-tampering incident.

Attention will now turn to the ongoing review of the conduct and culture of the Australian men’s cricket team which was announced by Cricket Australia CEO James Sutherland after Smith and Bancroft admitted to ball tampering during the third Test against South Africa in Cape Town.

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Sutherland’s position, one which he has held for the last 17 years, has come under pressure in the wake of the scandal, however the veteran administrator has been adamant that he has no plans to step down.