The Roar
The Roar

Adam Semple

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Joined January 2013

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Ex-cyclist, current runner. Ex real-estate agent, current photographer. Ex-barista, current ice-cream producer. Freelance-writer and small business owner of www.thegoodcase.com

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This is fantastic Sir! Cyclists are so illogical, abnormal, mad.

Who the hell wants to be regular though? Normality is the devil!

Cycling: Motivating the madness

Excellent responses.
Please note a couple of things:

For anyone who mentioned Greg Lemond as a culprit here; he is a poisonous egoist trying to take the reins of ‘Unabated Hero’ in the eyes of the American public. His company may have suffered because of Trek, but corporatocracy isn’t an avenue we should take in this discussion. Even though it’s a potent symptom of our consumerist society, it’s not our topic. The financial battle between Armstrong and Lemond isn’t important, as essentially they’re both victims of culture fighting for a dollar. No other ex-druggie has had to fight these allegations of ‘bullying, lies, bribery’ before, because they haven’t been pressed by federal agents with the whole world watching. Do you think the CEO’s of BHP and RIO TINTO, or the top minister’s of our government have never acted in a manner they oppresses others freedom? They do it behind closed doors and are remaining ‘hero’s of wealth.’ Yes Lance ‘bullied’ people… Not into taking drugs though? They were making huge dollars themselves. O’Reilly and co. suffered, yes, but the nature of Economics in our society lends this type of behaviour to leaders under pressure. I am not saying what Armstrong did was okay, it obviously wasn’t. This article was directed though, at the cause of Armstrong’s ethical demise.

Those bystanders suffered badly yes, so don’t get me wrong; I agree that everything Armstrong did was scandalous and morally disgusting, he is scum and he allowed himself to lie to and deceive the world, and destroy people’s lives. This we do not forgive him for, but the point of this article is determining how a human gets to that stage. Where do we and when did we loose our morals?

For those of you that mentioned how Armstrong is a bully. Yes, he bullied people. So does any boss in any business lacking morality as it’s top agenda? Armstrong just had a platform to do it on so we could all watch. I know many people that have said ‘no’ to drugs in the ’90s Euro cycling scene and were sent home for it. These people are the aforementioned that chose morality over dollars. These people are the true hero’s, the point is though that they hadn’t of missed out on anything if our society hadn’t dictated that dollars and ‘fame’ were what we humans strive for in life. That is my idea here. It is a question of “What is success?”

For those who conferred selfishness, greed, lies, and deceit (among others) as Armstrong’s imperfections, I implore we further entertain the idea that these qualities are derived from a society with skew ethical boundaries. We should further question what allowed somebody to become so poisonous and immoral.

Please also try and not forget that Armstrong doped in an era where it appears obvious that nearly everybody was doping. You cannot compare it to today, because today the standing on drugs in elite cycling is one of offensive disgust. Back then this was not the case and most of those who were winning were testing positive at some stage or another.

I understand this is a grey area of debate, but that is the debate most important to have. Remember I am not saying that Lance is a great person, he isn’t, and I stated that above declaring what he did isn’t simply forgivable. The point is to consider that this type of lying and ‘bullying’ happens all around the world everyday in situations balancing on millions of dollars and a fancy title. Our society misjudges success, which eventually leads to rotten moral agenda’s.

Lance Armstrong is a victim of society

Thanks for reading everybody. Check me out on @adamsemple for more cycling universality.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Lotto nailed the finish in a textbook fashion. Perfectly, and forcefully, they are true champions.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Boassen Hagen 3rd for a non-pure sprinter which is amazing. Slagter doesn’t know what hit him, but I’ll assure you, he won.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Greipel won by 2 lengths, even after Renshaw got a great jump with 200m to go.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Amazing attempt from Renshaw, he hit out very early with huge speed but was still toppled for by Greipel. Greipel wins. Slagter wins overall in Ochre.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

3 riders with 500m to go. Greipel should win this.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

STILL 4 riders from lotto on the front. 1km to go

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Boassen Hagen has it, he can sprint too.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Lotto lined up and Sky behind Lotto. Warfare for Greipel’s wheel.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Lotto first 4 riders around last corner.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Last lap and Luke Durbridge driving the front to keep Greenedge prominent at the front.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Jonathan Cantwell has crashed. Slid out on an insignificant corner.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Second last lap, the leaders have been caught as many teams are massing at the front to control the race. This keeps their team leaders out of trouble and everyone wants to be controlling it.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Greenedge and Vacansoleil have also started chasing. Matt Goss was one I have forgotten about, I will be tipping him today behind Greipel.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Lot’s of desperate guys without a result this weak. Hopefully we don’t see too much of a dangerous finale.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Second last lap and Martin Kohler is looking resplendent in his Swiss National Champion get-up.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

15 seconds for the break away. Same 3 guys, Lotto, Saxo, Blanco, at the front.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Maybe CJ Sutton? Renshaw? Those two are Aussie and keen.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

So it has been a 47.5kmh average speed for 75km of racing. That’s not slow.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

3 laps, 13.5km to go.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Saxo Bank are now on the front helping Lotto Belisol. Their sprint Jonothan Cantwell, came 3rd the other day after being blocked in. He will be very very keen today.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Kadri, Kohler and Kerby still away, about 30 seconds. Looking strong but …

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

Lap 16 of 20 now.

Tour Down Under 2013: Stage 6 Live blog

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