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AlsBoyce

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Joined August 2014

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Ex junior coach ex no 10. 63yo retired IT Mngr. Win with tough style in the Michael Cheika fashion is Australian Rugby at its best.

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Abandoning the AIS training program doesn’t sound like a good plan.
Rugby as a corporate entity operating in the world of “Big Sport” with rivers of cash available to be finessed sounds like it needs to have people experienced in TV and online sport involved in the decision-making. Whether that means that there needs to be total separation from any club affiliations (or not) definitely warrants examination. It sounds illogical, in that it implies that knowledge of rugby below the fully professional tier is not really relevant.
My impression is that the rivers of gold produced lazy corporate habits and a lot of snouts in the trough. The salary bill was way too high, no money was put into a cash reserve for a rainy day, and too much emphasis on the Rolls-Royce corporate operational methodology.
Sounds to me as though a review is absolutely necessary, and input needed from the non-professional levels of rugby, as well as sports media specialists.

No - now it's time for a serious shakeup in Australian rugby

No Super Rugby means no NSW Waratahs. A Sydney team in the proposed seven team early-season NRC-style comp effectively replaces the Waratahs, with the NSW Country team also part of that replacement.

A new path for Australian rugby

ARU management appears to be bloated in both staff numbers and salaries paid, and its performance has been poor probably since at least the end of the first John O’Neill stint as CEO. The current minor annual salary cut by the CEO Raelene Castle (even though it is 50%) amounts to a $400,000 cut. That amount slaps you in the face with the ridiculousness of the size of the salary in the first place. Other admin salaries, for the 25% not laid off, have been reduced by 30%. The players themselves, have not been told what their cuts will be.
Realistically, $50,000 max per player per annum is about the most possible. That amounts to $10 million. The ARU has $11 million cash and no income. The $1 million left after paying the players is all there is for ARU admin staff and coaches. At $50,000 each for them as well, there is enough for 20 people.
There will be no rugby, at best, until February 2021. The Super Rugby franchises need to be dissolved now, with the remnants cherry-picked and earmarked for resurrection in 2021 in the new proposed NRC comp.
The game has to protect its solvency.

A new path for Australian rugby

The best players playing (in the new NRC-styled early-season Super Rugby comp replacement) will make a huge difference. Star power is important.

A new path for Australian rugby

I doubt Ireland or Scotland have more BN players than Aus.
You can’t have actually read the article anyway, because the proposal is not Sydney-centric but nationwide. The proposal also aims at what is most achievable, not any pie-in-the-sky dreams.

A new path for Australian rugby

Simple is best, and a professional tier replacement for Super Rugby is the simplest with an NRC-style comp completed immediately prior to the June test window. I proposed seven teams in my article yesterday “A New Path For Australian Rugby”. Those teams were ACT, Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth, North QLD, and Northern NSW (the last two courtesy of Sheek – I’d called them NSW Country and QLD Country, but his existing provincial organisation arguments were eminently sensible).
All the existing Super Rugby / Wallaby players would be playing in it, so this competition would look more like a domestic Super Rugby, and not like the existing end-of-season NRC. It would therefore have star power and TV appeal, so rights would have greater value due to the quality on display.
Costs would be extremely high in a proposed 24 team club model, and there would be too many matches to viably broadcast. Three matches each week-end at 7.30pm on Free-to-air and Foxtel (shared like with NRL) is a nice dose of Australian Rugby that can build strength and audiences over time.
To start with there would be not a lot of money, so very lean admin and player salaries would have to apply.
Rugby does not have to attempt to emulate AFL and NRL, but rather produce a logical and quality product that the existing Rugby fanbase can enjoy and participate in. Over time, particularly via Free-To-Air access, the audience could be grown, if the quality builds and tribal-style support develops.

The rugby calendar of the future

Last week I saw something about NZ idolising the ABs, but below that they were less interested. Maybe they have grown a little tired of having less and less competition at Super Rugby level, making the matches way less interesting. Maybe the Mitre 10 Cup audience is affected by the drop-off in SR interest.
Crusaders support always seems strong though!

A new path for Australian rugby

The early-season Super Rugby domestic replacement competition concept obviously has all current Super Rugby and Wallaby players in it (if they haven’t left for Europe or Japan). After the June Test window, no Super Rugby would mean that those players could play in the suggested 3-way Origin-style series prior to the Rugby Championship, or play club rugby.
The club rugby standard would obviously be greatly improved by Super Rugby / Wallaby players playing in it, but that doesn’t mean it has not been and is not now a valid and valuable lower tier developing the next stars of the game (as it has done still up to now).

A new path for Australian rugby

Maybe you should read my article again …

A new path for Australian rugby

While that is true, drainfish, Australian Rugby has an opportunity to build on the work done in developing the Western Force and Melbourne Rebels, and before that the ACT Brumbies. Those cities have club competitions as well, but would not be strong enough as a club to compete with Sydney and Brisbane clubs.
The professional tier can lie above the club tier in Australian Rugby, as shown by the success of the Super 12. My proposal was like a domestic Super 12 concept with no stuffing around with teams and formats from season-to-season.

A new path for Australian rugby

Good idea, jeznez, about the origin series post June tests. It is a bit like the old Wallaby trial games – City v Country, Possibles v Probables, but with the origin-style feeling injected.

A new path for Australian rugby

That’s way too Bitta, Force.
Sydney and Brisbane have most of the players for a (major) start.
But my point was that the tribal feeling for Sydney at the 2001 Lions match at North Sydney Oval can be revived by promotion(!) and goodwill, and not being in a timeslot at the end of a long season.

A new path for Australian rugby

Money, sure. But a lack of Aus team results were affecting TV and ground support in Australia at least. NZ and SA too I think.

Australian rugby is at the crossroads

Odd game that. And Randwick were not at full strength nor were they a representative team. They were much stronger when they gave the ABs a fright in the early 1990s. There was always a representative tier of selected trial matches atop the club comps to work out a Wallabies squad. But the NRC-style comp in the early-season timeslot provides a professional tier at a higher level to better prepare the Wallabies possibles (and probables).

A new path for Australian rugby

Mea culpa, jeznez. Great game, and we thought things were starting to turn around for Aus rugby then. False dawn, however.
The Reds winning in 2011 was fantastic too of course. but the Super Rugby format kept getting worse, and Aus rugby kept leaking audience traction.

A new path for Australian rugby

My suggested new Australian professional rugby competition format was a discussion start point, and you’ve made some interesting additions, Sheek.
I like the idea of Northern NSW (Country) centred in Newcastle. Playing in Coffs Harbour, Tamworth and Dubbo as well ideally. Because it has been labelled “Northern”, however, Wollongong and Southern NSW are left out, though maybe your proposal has them aligned with ACT.
I fancied the seven teams to make the comp finished before the June Test window. That has the benefit of ramping up the excitement level immediately prior to the June tests, which should increase audiences both at the ground and on TV for those tests.
On that basis, NQ works for me, but no more teams after that. The quality would be affected and the June Test window would get in the way unless the comp starts earlier, which I don’t think is a good idea.

A new path for Australian rugby

I agree with the NZ system ramp-up after their RWC 2007 debacle has left Australia and to a lesser extent SA, behind.
Perhaps a Super 14 could have worked, but it still exacerbated the Australian problem by diluting the quality and assisting in Australian Super Rugby teams becoming less competitive. The other problem with it was the shutdown period for the June Test Window. I seem to recall that the same number of rounds were played, but there was an adjustment as to who played who year-to-year. Definitely not ideal. A full home-and-away season is always way superior.
The other problem though was the falling off of interest in the Brumbies, Waratahs and Reds after the Super 14 started and the results were heading south.
The Super 12 worked, but my point was that the Super 14 was the start of the demise of Super Rugby. And, unfortunately, once you’ve broken the egg, you can’t put it back together again.

Australian rugby is at the crossroads

Assistant referees are referees and should have the job of policing offside and lazy returners to their side.

It's time for a rule change

Good stuff, El Presidente.
I thought DHP would have been the man for fullback in the rain at Auckland, and during the WC sharing with Beale depending on opposition and conditions. Wing is not so good for DHP, though, because he has made some bad defensive choices out there. And I agree with your opinion about Koreibete. I much prefer Jack Maddocks, who has silky skills, speed, and reads the game brilliantly. Hodge has been playing well in my opinion, and I can forgive him the one overrun. As a smart player, he will do better next time. His defensive retrieval of Mo’unga’s kick to the corner, getting down and under the oncoming Lienart-Brown, was inspirational stuff!
As for Naisarani, he is certainly pretty one-dimensional, and Pete Samu offers a whole lot more around the field. He gets steals as well. Samu can’t bust over the gainline as well, but being a whole lot smarter player, he is the better bet.

Now the dust has settled, what really went wrong?

All Wallabies and their coaches need to read your comment Shed.

Now the dust has settled, what really went wrong?

Another important point!
I wonder at the Wallabies psychological preparedness. Some players inherently produce their best under pressure, while others just can’t do it. Those that can’t need assistance in their ability to handle the pressure, or, as you were inferring, be replaced by someone else who can.

Now the dust has settled, what really went wrong?

Thanks Ozrugbynut.
You’ve said what I was getting at.
The Wallabies were in it until the runaway Mo’unga try and had defended well near their line to keep the ABs to 0-3. Their attack was good as well in that period, but the finishing eluded them at those critical moments.
I think Genia’s arrival was the beginning of the real headless chook stuff, and I thought keeping White and keeping the score respectable was a better option for future confidence particularly. It’s often the case that replacement players overplay their hand, and Genia’s recent downgrading to second choice halfback isn’t a comfortable position for him.
The other important thing, however, is that I’m not a “doom and gloom” merchant. Optimism is best, and the Perth result was good enough to mean that there are possibilities for the Wallabies at the WC. The general opinion among the experts seems to be that the NZ aura has slipped, and there are a very close group of teams who could win at the WC on their day.

Now the dust has settled, what really went wrong?

Well he may have got away with passing it forward to hit Hodge properly, but probably not. Best would have been not to pass at all, but his decision time was short.

Now the dust has settled, what really went wrong?

You’re right that he should have kicked that goal. Lealiifano’s kicking has improved a lot this year, probably back to where he was prior to his medical problems put him out of the game for a period. The luck I was referring to was in relation to how close he got but failed. His next kick looked a lot worse. He struggled with confidence with those kicks, and it affected his game I think. Had the first one been marginally further to the right and went over, his game would have most likely been way better. I criticised his aimless kick that lead to the second try. He looked like he did not have the confidence to run it back and so retain possession. He may have made a different decision had that first kick gone over. Is that fragility good enough? No, but in Perth he played well.

Now the dust has settled, what really went wrong?

No, not just a massive whinge against the referee. But take a look at the aerial shots of Joe Moody scrummaging before you give Jaco Peyper a big tick. I saw the first penalty differently to you, but if I’m wrong I’ll accept that. It created a period of good attack from NZ, but also good defence from Wallabies with the end result that Wallabies down by 1 penalty goal. Not a bad result for them in the circumstances. the following 2 tries were the killer blows. They were created by Hodge overrunning and Lealiifano’s aimless kick.

Now the dust has settled, what really went wrong?