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Andrew Jones

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Cricket NSW CEO

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Australia's top 5 phantom cricketers

More cricket this week, although slightly less juvenile than last week’s Festival Of Onions. With Cricket Australia’s contract list out last week and the Ashes side to be named today, it struck me that there is now a set of phantom cricketers in Australia: players who appear real to observers of the game, but not […]

Thanks Jarijari. It’s important to understand that CA operates on a 4 year financial cycle. Surpluses vary widely because revenue fluctuates significantly while costs are stable. Revenue fluctuates partly because of crowds but mainly because Indian TV rights money is far higher in the years India tours than in the years they don’t. Same with UK rights although numbers are lower. Costs are stable because distributions to State Associations and to players are smoothed. Otherwise State funding and player salaries would jump around from year to year, which is unhelpful. CA then holds reserves to cashflow this volatility on behalf of States and players, plus keep a buffer for the proverbial rainy day (or season)

NSW Cricket CEO: Are we worried about small Sheffield Shield attendances? Not at all

Quite right Ed. Very significant increase in number of balls in play (fewer wides and no balls) and hence runs and wickets. Also increase in scoring areas. Kids don’t generally set up 20m pitches in the backyard or schoolyard and there is a reason for that – 20m is too long for that age.

NSW Cricket CEO: Are we worried about small Sheffield Shield attendances? Not at all

Nathan’s from Young and a proud Bluebagger. Note also that CACT is a member of CNSW: all our pathway squads up to Futures League are now split between NSW Metro and ACT/NSW Country instead of having a single NSW team.

And we are very proud of our lads’ efforts in India.

NSW Cricket CEO: Are we worried about small Sheffield Shield attendances? Not at all

No chance of the Test players always playing – they can’t be in two places at once. Same for BBL.

And yes kids and parents have more choice – hence the need to provide the best possible experience. This is about age-appropriate playing conditions. Why should small kids play on a pitch the same length as adults? Doesn’t happen in any football code to my knowledge and same principle applies in cricket. Same for number of players.

NSW Cricket CEO: Are we worried about small Sheffield Shield attendances? Not at all

Thanks Matthew. Short answer is that the SCG is the home of NSW cricket and players cherish playing there. Our policy is to play 4 x SCG and 1 x regional Shield games per year. We have played in Wagga Wagga, Newcastle, Coffs Harbour and Wollongong in the past 3 seasons. All except Newcastle were new venues for Shield cricket and crowds peaked at about 2000 on the biggest day. Note that Albury Border Bash practice matches between Sydney Thunder and Melbourne Stars this year attracted nearly 10,000 fans so BBL is a huge attraction.

NSW Cricket CEO: Are we worried about small Sheffield Shield attendances? Not at all

Hi Debbie –

Thanks for the shout-out in a very fine article. Just to clarify, Australian Cricket is 100% committed to being a sport equally for women and men, boys and girls for both equity AND growth reasons. So it all adds up to concerted effort and action to get females playing, watching, working and volunteering in the game, which of course many girls and women already do.

We also want to change fundamentally the perception of cricket, so that it is seen to be a sport equally for men and women. To achieve this, women need to be able to see themselves in the game in all areas on an off-field. Tennis is the sport that has done this the best to date (although I hasten to add that it is not as popular as cricket overall). Cricket continues to be led and showcased brilliantly on the field by the Southern Stars (3 time World T20 Champions) and NSW Breakers (winners of 9 consecutive WNCL titles) and we are now working very actively on the off-field side of things – especially fans and employees – as well.

In doing so, one of a number of key challenges to overcome is simply that, for various reasons, not as many women as men like cricket at the moment. This is a particular challenge when recruiting, as our candidate pools tend to skew heavily male. But we are on the case and taking steps to improve the situation, while continuing to hire strictly on merit.

Thanks again for the article. Here’s hoping the Breakers win a 10th consecutive title and that you are the first woman picked for the SCG Media Hall of Fame.

All the best
AJ

Whose sport is it anyway?

@Bay35Pablo:

Technically they’d be:

1. Attacking footy
2. Attacking footy
3. Ticker and defensive starch
4. Attacking footy
5. The ability to win – in 2005 by scoring 30+ points, in 2010 by winning the close ones

But yes, basically attacking footy!

Agree with your analysis re the change from small pack and poor defence to good pack and mostly good defence. Galloway, Ellis and the improvement of Gibbs (and Fulton) have made a big difference. So too the improved bench: Fifita, Dwyer et al.

Here’s hoping this Saturday!

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