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The Roar

Once Upon a Time on the Roar

Roar Guru

Joined June 2020

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While no Muslims are asking Christmas celebrators not to say Merry Christmas among each other, it is poor form, and really dumb to say it to a Muslim. Poor form for ignorantly assuming that the whole world celebrates Christmas when only about 1/3 of the world’s people do, and plain dumb because it’s the same as a Muslim saying “Have a good fast (during Ramadan)” to people they know are not Muslims. It’s about worldly awareness. The western world in general seems to be more lacking and presumptuous in that regard.

'The boys have my back': Khawaja reveals how much Cummins' champagne gesture meant to him

David, England did not win the world cup, the final was tied.

'It's really annoying me': David Gower blasts England's attitude towards Test cricket

Yeah don’t really know Jeff, it’s a real dilemma for sure. The way he batted this test must surely ensure he is zero chance for England in 18 months. I guess, the sooner they start trying out not just individual openers, but also combinations the better. Usman’s not a long term solution either, and he’s nothing crash hot in England either. A real bugger Pucovski not gonna amount to anything. It’s criminal that Renshaw’s not opening for qld. Not saying he’s the solution, but a better prospect than either Burns or Street.

DAY 2 REPORT: Wickets tumble as Cummins puts Australia on top of England

We are not spoilt for choice with openers right now. Most other facets of the team appear to be falling into place.

DAY 2 REPORT: Wickets tumble as Cummins puts Australia on top of England

Hope he hangs around for a while .

DAY 2 REPORT: Wickets tumble as Cummins puts Australia on top of England

It was totally associated. The pitch wasn’t a flat featherbed batsman’s paradise.

DAY 1 REPORT: Head’s masterclass 101 teaches England a lesson after Australian top order fails

Right. Very interesting.

The best Test XII of the last 30 years, with 12 Test nations represented

Don ‘t know about any of those … can you tell me?

The best Test XII of the last 30 years, with 12 Test nations represented

Shakib al Hasan literally means ‘Bright Star the Handsome’.

The best Test XII of the last 30 years, with 12 Test nations represented

I thought it was pretty accurate.

DAY 1 REPORT: Head’s masterclass 101 teaches England a lesson after Australian top order fails

It was a very low scoring game so I think it only lasted three days. None the less two of the first three days should be on the weekend as that is when the match is in its decisive phase.

DAY 1 REPORT: Head’s masterclass 101 teaches England a lesson after Australian top order fails

No … but I’ll make some calls tomorrow and get back to you. 👍 👍

FLEM'S VERDICT: 'Test cricket's alive' as 'Gilly-like' Head outguns disappointing England

👍 👍 👍

FLEM'S VERDICT: 'Test cricket's alive' as 'Gilly-like' Head outguns disappointing England

No. It’s great Head and Green had the chance to perform from 3 for 12 and 4 for 84 respectively. Reward the curator with all the magic mushrooms his heart desires.

FLEM'S VERDICT: 'Test cricket's alive' as 'Gilly-like' Head outguns disappointing England

Yeah. I’m actually thinking watching the replays that Labu fell over because, realising the ball had got passed him, he had some grandiose idea he could still get his bat out in time to intercept it before it hit the stumps. Quick thinking maybe, however fruitless?

FLEM'S VERDICT: 'Test cricket's alive' as 'Gilly-like' Head outguns disappointing England

It was interesting that, given the dismissal put Australia back in deep poop at 4 for 84, Smith and Cummins were seen cracking up on the balcony barely containing their laughter.

FLEM'S VERDICT: 'Test cricket's alive' as 'Gilly-like' Head outguns disappointing England

Of course you did. You’re the Rowdy Roarer. We should never doubt you again.

FLEM'S VERDICT: 'Test cricket's alive' as 'Gilly-like' Head outguns disappointing England

Yes, that is precisely the situation I was adamant pre-series he couldn’t handle. I’m glad he actually can. He wafted outside off three times and missed completely. A year ago he would have got a nick, so he has obviously grown in class.

FLEM'S VERDICT: 'Test cricket's alive' as 'Gilly-like' Head outguns disappointing England

Deplorable behaviour, at any level of cricket, and any age, but gee, I remain so sceptical about height when it comes to ball tracking accuracy, though I have always trusted the line aspect.

'That's disgraceful': Vaughan calls for Kohli sanction after Indians' meltdown reaction to 'impossible' Hawkeye decision

I don’t know much about Jones’s personality other than the fact that his autobiography leaves one in little doubt that he was ‘never out’ as a batsman. However, he did seem to mellow in later years and not take himself so seriously, and most of us are guilty of that at least some times in our respective lives. But rather superfluous, against the stronger oppositions of his time, he was a non-contributor in wins, and the worst of the non-performers in losses. An average of 46 does not change that.

PS, sorry about the double post earlier, but that is entirely the roar’s fault.

Khawaja gets nod over Harris for fifth Test, Boland may be out

That doesn’t negate the authentically dissected numbers I provided earlier in this conversation with Don Freo.

Khawaja gets nod over Harris for fifth Test, Boland may be out

Lara’s 375, or 400 not out for that matter doesn’t diminish his record as such, but these are in no way the innings that define him. They were meaningless innings played in conditions where neither side ever had any even remote hope of snaring 20 opposition wickets – where is the greatness in that.

I once made 175 not out as a 12 year old in the back yard of my 11 year old friend who was an intellectual friend rather than sporty friend. I smashed him and his 9 year old sister all over their back yard, and I have never before or since felt so in the zone. However, I rate my 89 in the back yard a year or so later much higher as it was played against my much more competitive brother and cousins, in a space of far fewer gaps in the field to exploit …

Lara’s 153 not out in Bridgetown 1999 was a far superior innings to either his 375 or 400 not out, just as Michael Clarke’s 151 was a far superior innings to his 329 not out a few months later.

Innings are not to be judged by sheer volume of runs, but other much more important factors. Which has more impact: a 750 ml bottle of beer, or a 375 ml bottle of rum?

Khawaja gets nod over Harris for fifth Test, Boland may be out

Warner has not been a complete flop at test cricket by any means. But he has also not been a genuine world class performer too often, even at home, and has not had any even remotely world class openers at shield level breathing down his neck for the duration of his entire career.

He has been in some partnerships, but context is always needed and as good an example as any is his 158 run stand with Michael Clarke on the 3rd day of the first test of the 2013-14 Ashes. Australia began their second innings 159 ahead, or not at 0 for 0 but rather 0 for +159. When his opening partner, Chris Rogers, was out early on day 3, it was 1 for +226. It wasn’t a crisis when no 3 Watson failed to leave them 2 for +234. Lunch was taken at 2 for +304. So, the match has already passed its decisive point when the partnership has only reached 70, so hardly a match defining partnership, even to that point, when 8 wickets still stood and England already out of the match.

That 158 partnership is not what won Australia the match. It was the 7th wicket partnership of 133 from 6 for 132 on the first day between Brad Haddin and Mitchell Johnson, and then of course Mitchell Johnson’s bowling that won Australia the test. Warner made 49 on that critical first day and was 4th out with the total only on 83.

Khawaja gets nod over Harris for fifth Test, Boland may be out

Mike Brearley didn’t play more tests for several reasons. When England had a very capable skipper in Tony Grieg, who was also a fine cricketer, they didn’t need a specialist captain who was possibly not even a good enough batsman to even hold a spot in a county side.

Then Brearley left test cricket of his own accord, twice. The first time was in early 1980, when it was assumed that golden all-rounder Ian Botham would be an excellent captain. Then when that went completely pear shaped, Brearley was coaxed back not quite midway through the 1981 Ashes, he made it clear he was only willing to do the rest of that same series, win, lose or draw.

Krezja may have taken 8 wickets in an innings, but he also conceded more than 200 runs in doing so, in fact virtually half India’s entire total. It was a stock, rather than strike bowling performances and if that is a bowler’s best, then their not up to test standard – selectors don’t need to look at his average to figure that out.

Michael Bevan didn’t play more test cricket because he couldn’t play the short ball and he played in an era where at least four of our opponents had top class fast bowlers. Nothing to do with his average.

Shaun Tait could not bowl fast and maintain accuracy and control too much longer than 4 overs in any given day which made him a dud for anything other than T20. Again, selectors don’t need to look at his average, merely the fact that he didn’t get good test batsman out with anywhere near enough regularity when given opportunities.

Devon Malcom was a hot and cold enigma, but his hot enough and often enough that Steve Waugh wrote in his 800 page autobiography that he and his batting colleagues always breathed a huge sigh of belief whenever the conversative English selectors left him out in favour of a piddling line and length medium pacer.

Don’t know too much about Lee Germon other than the 1996 world cup final, but again, I would say he just couldn’t exert impact at test level, and again, selectors don’t need to google his average to know this – they only have to watch him in action when they give him a chance to show what he can do.

Cameron Bancroft did not play a single significant innings during the 10 or so tests he was picked for, so again we don’t need to look up averages – just watch him in action. Renshaw was dropped on early season shield form, rather than most recent test form, and this is something Ian Chappell is extremely critical of. Joe Burns is too hit and miss. Marcus Harris is simply out of his depth, and we only need to watch him struggle with our own eyes to know this, we do not need to know his raw average.

Dean Jones is another you could have mentioned. Selectors didn’t need to look up his average in Wisden. They had seen him struggle big time in three successive test series against England 1990-91, West Indies 1991 and then India 1991-92. They weren’t fooled by him topping the averages in Sri Lanka in late 1992 for two reasons: 1. They knew it was more than likely an aberration in his poor record over the past two years, 2. They followed that series closely and knew that a fair portion of his runs were made in soft situations that didn’t really matter, namely when a match was already doomed to a draw when he went in and 3. The next series was against the mighty West Indies, against whom, Jones had never reached 50 in 7 non-dead rubber tests. It would have been extremely foolish to retain him based on a superficial, miss-leading raw average of 46 – one of the selectors at the time, John Benaud, said as much, albeit somewhat more diplomatically, in his book ‘Matters of Choice’.

Khawaja gets nod over Harris for fifth Test, Boland may be out

Mike Brearley didn’t play more tests for several reasons. When England had a very capable skipper in Tony Grieg, who was also a fine cricketer, they didn’t need a specialist captain who was possibly not even a good enough batsman to even hold a spot in a county side.

Then Brearley left test cricket of his own accord, twice. The first time was in early 1980, when it was assumed that golden all-rounder Ian Botham would be an excellent captain. Then when that went completely pear shaped, Brearley was coaxed back not quite midway through the 1981 Ashes, he made it clear he was only willing to do the rest of that same series, win, lose or draw.

Krezja may have taken 8 wickets in an innings, but he also conceded more than 200 runs in doing so, in fact virtually half India’s entire total. It was a stock, rather than strike bowling performances and if that is a bowler’s best, then their not up to test standard – selectors don’t need to look at his average to figure that out.

Michael Bevan didn’t play more test cricket because he couldn’t play the short ball and he played in an era where at least four of our opponents had top class fast bowlers. Nothing to do with his average.

Shaun Tait could not bowl fast and maintain accuracy and control too much longer than 4 overs in any given day which made him a dud for anything other than T20. Again, selectors don’t need to look at his average, merely the fact that he didn’t get good test batsman out with anywhere near enough regularity when given opportunities.

Devon Malcom was a hot and cold enigma, but his hot enough and often enough that Steve Waugh wrote in his 800 page autobiography that he and his batting colleagues always breathed a huge sigh of belief whenever the conversative English selectors left him out in favour of a piddling line and length medium pacer.

Don’t know too much about Lee Germon other than the 1996 world cup final, but again, I would say he just couldn’t exert impact at test level, and again, selectors don’t need to google his average to know this – they only have to watch him in action when they give him a chance to show what he can do.

Cameron Bancroft did not play a single significant innings during the 10 or so tests he was picked for, so again we don’t need to look up averages – just watch him in action. Renshaw was dropped on early season shield form, rather than most recent test form, and this is something Ian Chappell is extremely critical of. Joe Burns is too hit and miss. Marcus Harris is simply out of his depth, and we only need to watch him struggle with our own eyes to know this, we do not need to know his raw average.

Dean Jones is another you could have mentioned. Selectors didn’t need to look up his average in Wisden. They had seen him struggle big time in three successive test series against England 1990-91, West Indies 1991 and then India 1991-92. They weren’t fooled by him topping the averages in Sri Lanka in late 1992 for two reasons: 1. They knew it was more than likely an aberration in his poor record over the past two years, 2. They followed that series closely and knew that a fair portion of his runs were made in soft situations that didn’t really matter, namely when a match was already doomed to a draw when he went in and 3. The next series was against the mighty West Indies, against whom, Jones had never reached 50 in 7 non-dead rubber tests. It would have been moronic to retain him based on a superficial, miss-leading raw average of 46 – one of the selectors at the time, John Benaud, said as much, albeit somewhat more diplomatically, in his book ‘Matters of Choice’.

Khawaja gets nod over Harris for fifth Test, Boland may be out

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