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DaveJ

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Joined December 2017

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The finale was a good example of the dumbness of allowing 3 point kick attempts way out from the tryline, although this was one occasion it accidentally made for a tight finish. There is zero logic in giving a 3 point kick for a minor infringement on the defensive side of halfway when there isn’t the slightest threat on the tryline. Or pretty much anything outside the 22. And wasting 75-90 seconds with nothing happening. Especially when rugby is trying to speed things up, and you can’t do much about scrums. It’s just a relic from the past. Extraordinary nonsense.

Brumbies end 15-year drought against Crusaders as 80th minute penalty try seals remarkable finish

Great article AD. Though we can’t completely ignore the Test average of 22 and only 4 50s in 28 innings. Not helped by an average of 18 and HS of 35 in 5 Tests in Australia in 1902-02. Recovering from seasickness no doubt!

The true inventor of Bazball was born 150 years ago, and his records are still utterly bonkers

Cricinfo has been adding in scoring rates for a lot of matches in the 20s – 40s, thanks to the work of Davis and others, though not as early as Jessop. For example, if you look up Walter Hammond’s profile there is no scoring rate, but if you look him up on the stats calculator and filter for matches against Australia, you find he only averaged 38 across his career against
Aus, not much better than Boycott or Atherton, despite having the reputation of being a dashing batsman.

The true inventor of Bazball was born 150 years ago, and his records are still utterly bonkers

Yes great points AD. To add, Anderson’s ordinary average away from home – 31 against everyone, also 30 both home and away vs SA. Marshall averaged 21.6 away from home, Hadlee 21.7, Ambrose 20.9, McGrath 20.8.

And the longevity is an illusion. It was reliant on being kept in mothballs and not playing first class cricket. In his 21+ year career from 2002 he bowled 1,300 fewer overs in all forms of cricket than did Hadlee in his 18 year career from 1972-90. In the last 13 1/2 years of his career from 2010, Anderson he bowled 2,300 overs FEWER than McGrath did in all cricket in the 13/12 years of his Test career.

England need rejig with Ashes on horizon so now is right time for Anderson to retire one of the greatest of all time

Not so. Anderson ranks 53rd out of 75 in the averages among all Test players to bowl 25 innings or more against Australia, behind such players as Chris Woakes and Zaheer Khan. And the full list includes all rounders and part timers like Root and Viv Richards. The worst for people sometimes mentioned as greats are Larwood on 29.9 and Dale Steyn on 27.5. Those of the ilk of Hadlee, Marshall, Ambrose, Barnes, Holding, Imran, Trueman, Snow – 25 or under. Also Kapil Dev.

Allied the greats all averaged in the low to mid 20s away from home, the best indicator. Marshall averaged 21.6 away from home, Hadlee 21.7, Ambrose 20.9, McGrath 20.8.

And the longevity is an illusion. It was totally reliant on being kept in mothballs and not playing first class cricket. In his 21+ year career from 2002 he bowled 1,300 fewer overs in all forms of cricket than did Hadlee in his 18 year career from 1972-90. In the last 13 1/2 years of his career from 2010, Anderson he bowled 2,300 overs FEWER than McGrath did in all cricket in the 13/12 years of his Test career.

England need rejig with Ashes on horizon so now is right time for Anderson to retire one of the greatest of all time

Wiki, good points, and even the longevity is an illusion. It was totally reliant on being kept in mothballs and not playing first class cricket. In his 21+ year career from 2002 he bowled 1,300 fewer overs in all forms of cricket than did Hadlee in his 18 year career from 1972-90. In the last 13 1/2 years of his career from 2010, Anderson bowled 2,300 overs FEWER than McGrath did in all cricket in the 13 1/2 years of his Test career.

As you say he wasn’t great against the better teams, nor away from home. Anderson averaged 31 away from home, 36 against Australia (home and away) and 30 against SA. The best all averaged in the low to mid 20s away from home. Marshall averaged 21.6 away from home, Hadlee 21.7, Ambrose 20.9, McGrath 20.8. It’s been a bit harder away from home the last ten years or so with shorter tours, but he’s still not in the same ballpark. Away from home has a higher degree of difficulty, more comparable with other players, and over a range of conditions.

England need rejig with Ashes on horizon so now is right time for Anderson to retire one of the greatest of all time

Not in the same ball park as Sir Richard Hadlee, Malcolm Marshall, Glenn McGrath, Dennis Lillee, Curtly Ambrose, Joel Garner, Allan Donald, Imran Khan, Wasim Akram, Dale Steyn, Ray Lindwall, Sidney Barnes, Pat Cummins, Jaspreet Bumrah.

He is statistically the most prolific fast bowler in cricket history ONLY if you rate quantity over quality. Quality is judged by averages over a long period – at least 8-10 years – and looking at things like performance against the best teams and away from home. Anderson averaged 31 away from home, 36 against Australia (home and away) and 30 against SA. The best all averaged in the low to mid 20s away from home. Marshall averaged 21.6 away from home, Hadlee 21.7, Ambrose 20.9.

Sure, magnificent effort by Jim to keep playing Tests for so long. But his longevity relied on being kept in mothballs and not playing first class cricket. In his 21+ year career from 2002 he bowled 1,300 fewer overs in all forms of cricket than did Hadlee in his 18 year career from 1972-90. In the last 13 1/2 years of his career from 2010, Anderson bowled 2,300 overs FEWER than McGrath did in the 13/12 years of his Test career.

England need rejig with Ashes on horizon so now is right time for Anderson to retire one of the greatest of all time

Good point AD. I guess we can only compare people between areas in terms of their levels of success within their own eras.

Team of the Month: a May-born World Cricket XI

That’s true in T20s. But since then in all T20s is 28 in 11 innings. And he just looks like he’s lost it in the IPL, on the flattest and truest tracks ever seen – nothing for spin or pace. But yes some credit in the bank for his previous T20Is. And his spin is going Ok, which might be useful in the Caribbean where pitches might turn a bit more than this season’s IPL.

T20 World Cup: Marsh named captain, Smith and Fraser-McGurk miss out

Warner still a great athlete and outfielder, just batting the issue.

T20 World Cup: Marsh named captain, Smith and Fraser-McGurk miss out

Great work as usual AD. I think a strong case to be made that Verity’s is a more impressive record than Trumble’s, given conditions meant runs per wicket were about 30% higher in the 1930s. Turner and Hunte arguably have potential claims ahead of Greenidge, but these are all line ball decisions. But maybe view of GG was dimmed a bit when he got out first over against my team in a grade game against a terrible ball ball by an ordinary bowler. Dexter vs Armstrong another line all.

On the question of whether Headley was second best WI batter, I’d say he’s behind Sobers, who tops the ICC retrospective rankings in at least ten years of his career and himself has a case to be regarded as no.1. Headley’s great stats were against England, not Australia and based mainly on two tours of the Caribbean in which England had 2nd string attacks. None of the bowlers in 1930 played against Australia a few months later at home, and only one in 1935 played against Aus the following year. No doubt Headley was amazing and it’s a case that’s hard to judge. But I’d say that on the basis of those facts plus his small sample size, Lara deserves to be in the top 3 with Viv and Sobers.

Team of the Month: a May-born World Cricket XI

I should have added the Bills could be further strengthened with WG Grace instead of Edrich or AN Other. For the Alans – strengthen the batting and spin with Alan Steel, rated as second only to WG as an all rounder in the 1880s. Scored the first Test century at Lord’s. Also old school, for the Andrews Stoddart probably has a more impressive reputation than Hudson or Hilditch.

Matt, Mat or Matthew... The Best XI that shares the popular great name to play top-level cricket

For the Bills – not sure who the Oldfield from the Windies was, perhaps you meant William Albert Stanley Oldfield as keeper? Otherwise Murdoch as you probably know kept in FC and Spofforth refused to play in the first Test because Blackham was preferred over him. Otherwise, we have Bill Storer for England and William Carkeek for Aus, 6 Tests each. You should do this as an article in itself if you haven’t before? Many won’t have seen this one or the comments. You could calculate their comparative net averages if you really want to drive yourself mad: aggregate averages minus 2.5 x best 4 bowling averages (or 2 x 5 best). At a glance , I’d say it’s a close thing between the Mikes and the Bills. Possibly the Bills?

Matt, Mat or Matthew... The Best XI that shares the popular great name to play top-level cricket

Geoff, you haven’t seen the series I’m talking about? It’s a bit tedious but I’ve gone back to the series to fact check, rather than impose on the hardworking folk at the Roar. It’s at about the 59th minute of episode 4 in the series, showing you give a massive send off with a big F off or P off to an England batsman in an ODI – looks a bit like Derek Randall, or was it Wayne Larkins or someone less familiar? It was just after they had you saying how you were a more intellectual sledger than most, and Garner saying you weren’t the nicest on the field, and you proudly saying it was a win that Gooch thought you were the nastiest. There was also an earlier clip in the episode that seemed to show you giving another sendoff, but I stand corrected if that was the only one. Anyhow, the whole implication of the segment was that you thoroughly endorsed that kind of thing – a kind of contrast, especially straight after a very extended section about you bemoaning Chappell’s lack of support- so perhaps blame the filmmakers and don’t shoot the messenger? But hasty of me to imply you were an extreme sender-offer. And my bad also not including you among the leading quicks of the decade along with Lillee and Alderman for Aus. I have fond memories of seeing you lead the way in beating the Poms at the SCG to take the Ashes.

Being a bigot would usually be something like Lenny Pascoe calling Vic a “black c..” But do you think my comments were to do with a weird state allegiance? I’m a bit from all over, but a fan of NSW cricket if anything (though whisper it softly, there are some people with true state bigotism around here who might hold it against me). Best wishes and thanks for a great career.

Reliving the Eighties and a great era for fast bowlers

Good question AD. Looking at across all sides with good bowlers, I don’t think it was any easier being in weaker teams, and of course at times they weren’t that weak thanks in large part to those two. Surely having less pressure from the other end evens out any advantage of sharing the spoils less. If teams have 4 good bowlers like the Windies in the 80s they can still have 3 averaging in Hadlee’s territory if they are good enough.

Reliving the Eighties and a great era for fast bowlers

Very true about the bowlers. Such a pity we can’t see Barnes and see whether the hype was true, as so many old timers tales prove unconvincing. I still can’t get over Clem Hill’s description “I played three different balls. Three balls to play in a split second- a straight ‘un, an in-swinger and a break back” – and on a perfect wicket apparently. Impossible to make a ball break back -as they talked about in those days – with a new ball on a perfect wicket. Ashwin, Lyon, Murali can’t do it. Unless he had some magic trick that no one else has found since? Or he just managed to hit the seam and it cut back, and there was more grass on it than you’d describe for a perfect wicket.

Team of the Month: an April-born World Cricket XI

The average runs per wicket for all Test batsmen in Shrewsbury’s era of 1882-93 was 18.6, compared to the long term average since 1920, which has been pretty stable at 30.8 +/- 1.2. So 40% lower! If we adjust Shrewsbury’s average upwards by 40% to make it more comparable, we get 49.7, fantastic for an opener.

Team of the Month: an April-born World Cricket XI

A fine selection as always AD. Fry deserves a run for his overall interesting character and career alone. Besides getting first-class honours in Classics at Oxford, and being an international in cricket and soccer, it’s claimed that but for an unfortunate injury he would have added a rugby Blue at Oxford to his other honours, and was also a fine boxer, a passable golfer, swimmer, sculler, tennis player and javelin thrower. Apparently, he was at the League of Nations – which he also wrote a book about – as part of the Indian delegation, at the prompting of Ranjitsinghi, his old partner for Sussex and England. So a more interesting teammate than the staid Dennis Amiss.

But while it’s always hard to compare with pre WWI players like Fry, Amiss is 4th all time in averages for England as an opener, on 54, behind only Hutton, Sutcliffe and Hobbs and 5 runs better than the next, Boycott. He did have a poor record against Australia, only averaging 15 in 11 Tests, but had some great innings against the Windies, eg a 200 in the 1976 game in which Holding cleaned up his teammates and took 14 wickets. Fry only averaged 32 in 18 Tests, never toured Australia and opened in fewer than half his Tests. But I’d happily keep him in the team ahead of Gower.

I’d say it would be a close call between Knott and Healy for best keeper. I can’t believe Wisden picked Knott in their best ever team ahead of Gilchrist. Doesn’t matter if Knott was a slightly better keeper – can you imagine how many skippers or selectors would pick him out of the two to help win a game. I’d say no more than 5 out of 100. I believe McDermott was only 19 on debut btw.

Team of the Month: an April-born World Cricket XI

Yes the England series had pretty good pitches.

Australia vs India: A stronger Test rivalry than the Ashes down under in recent times?

Still sometimes impossible to put paragraph breaks on this website!

Australia vs India: A stronger Test rivalry than the Ashes down under in recent times?

Nice article Kamran. I agree that the Ashes competitions lately haven’t been as challenging in Australia, though they’ve been more even away from home for us than in India! The next India series will be a big challenge for Australia. For that reason I’m not sure I’m looking forward to it as much as another Ashes series! For us older types, there is nothing quite as satisfying as beating the Poms. But it should be great cricket- Indian batting might give them the upper hand. To give credit where it’s due, South Africa is the one other country that has done well in Australia in recent decades. Won three series here from 2007-8 to -2016-17, only 3 Test series unfortunately. SA were overall best team in the world in that 10 year stretch, although Australia also managed to win a couple of series in SA.
When you say India found a blueprint on how to win in Australia in 2018-19, I think it’s simply a case of finally having a really good all round pace attack. Before that India only had one really good quick at the most- in fact only Kapil in the 80s was a really top line paceman, with all due respect to the likes of Srinath, Ishant and Zaheer Khan. It reminds me of the legend that keeps getting repeated about Clive Lloyd finding a magical formula to win with four great paceman. No, they just suddenly emerged and the best bowlers were picked as they had been beforehand and have been since. They don’t grow on trees. And when the Windies went to India or Pakistan they picked a spinner.

Australia vs India: A stronger Test rivalry than the Ashes down under in recent times?

Thanks v much Kamran. Will definitely read. Everyone was pretty much wearing helmets by the 80s but not always with the face guard. The first face guards were wide plastic wraparound strips with holes that weren’t as comfortable as the later ones with a grille design and more air coming through. Viv was about the only one who never wore a helmet. But they had only really come in in the late 70s around the time of WSC. Before that, imagine facing Jeff Thomson bouncers at
150-160kph!

Reliving the Eighties and a great era for fast bowlers

Thanks Colin. Chatfield and Cairns weren’t too bad in their day. The more I’ve read of Hadlee’s career, the more I’m convinced he should be convinced he should be in the top three quicks of all time, certainly the top 5, especially if we look at the best ten years of a bowler’s career.

Reliving the Eighties and a great era for fast bowlers

Hi Wiki, yes remember him having a great season in the 82-83 Ashes. Was a bit up and down after that and a couple of injuries, but fine seasons in 84-85 vs Windies and 89 Ashes. Not up there with the same career figures but excellent at his best.

Reliving the Eighties and a great era for fast bowlers

Indeed, and for most of these guys I believe it was either the first grade club they played with, or the one they spent most years with. Though not sure about MacGill in that regard.

Incredible drama as Victorian Premier Cricket club go full Bazball, win grand final with all time run chase for 70-year first

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