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DaveJ

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Joined December 2017

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V true. And they wouldn’t necessarily have had to play the B team against Aus. Not as much rest as the opposition, but maybe enough if the team is really motivated.

Pressure on as Wallabies chase must-win final game of 2020

If Warner misses most of the Test series, I guess it could be seen as evening things up a bit for India losing Kohli. Will be happy to see how Pucovski goes, but I might have been happy to see him tried in the middle order first.

Warner’s absence to expose Test openers again

You might be selling Shami short- his record is quite similar to Starc and Hazlewood, which is impressive given the number of matches played on Indian pitches. In the 140s most of the time.

Warner’s absence to expose Test openers again

Definitely right about the Australians being affected by a tough Indian tour, and that they weren’t the strongest Aussie team. A couple of points to correct. Ian Chappell wasn’t the main batsman at the time, he averaged just under 40, with 4 centuries in 5 years. Doug Walters had been the best record by far and Lawry’s average and weight of runs were also way ahead of Chappell’s. The fact is that only Walters and Lawry in the team averaged over 40 before the series started, underlining that it wasn’t the strongest batting lineup. MacKenzie may have been tired and unwell, but he wasn’t over the hill – 28 when the tour started.
Nicholas doesn’t suggest in the linked article that the best South African team of 1977 (let alone 1970) would have beaten or thrashed the 80s Windies. He only says that they would have beaten the rest of the world at that time, which is probably true. Perhaps he made the claim elsewhere? I tend to think Nicholas’s SA lineup of 1977 might have equalled or even shaded the greatest West Indian teams of the early/mid-80s if they head all filled their potential, and the 1969-70 team wasn’t too far behind. But as you say, it’s all rather speculative and not tested in the cauldron of actual Test play.

How a tired and ageing Australian cricket team made South Africa look great

“Berry whistling the first scrum at 1:49; the first ‘set’ happening at 2:45, the second ‘set’ at 3:33, with the ball finally cleared at 3:40. All for Berry to award a penalty to the All Blacks! “
I noted the same thing and added that the kick was finally taken at 5.15 as the clock ran on. So that’s about 3.25 of the first 5.15 minutes with virtually nothing happening. Apart from the excessive time for scrums, again pointed to the wasteful, pointless and unnecessary aspect of kicks at goals for things like scrum infringements from 40 metres from goal.
There was a similar incident at 43.10. The ABs were awarded a penalty near the Argie line and opted for a scrum. The ball finally came out of the scrum after two resets at 46.15 – I.e. THREE MINUTES of our lives we won’t get back (ok I don’t mind watching a good scrum for 15-20 seconds or so, so subtract that bit).

The Wrap: Rugby learnings 101 - All Blacks show how it’s done in Newcastle

Well he is well behind Warner and Maxwell, as well as Gilly. 8 runs is a substantial difference. Just behind Marnus and Travis Head and about equal with Mike Hussey. So I don’t think people who perceived him as being a strong innings builder and accumulator rather than a big hitter or super fast scorer were off the mark at all. Smith has only hit 42 6’s in 124 games, while Ponting hit 159 in 374 and Hayden hit 87 in 160, in an era of mostly smaller bats. These bats of the last 10-15 years are a big reason why you can’t readily compare players of today with those of earlier eras. Viv Richards strike rate of 90 (when also the boundaries weren’t brought in 10-20 metered) would equate to about 105-110 today, with the likes of Roy, Buttler, Hetmyer. Smith still doesn’t make the fastest 100 career S/Rs of all time – but maybe he will if he continues to play innings like these last two.

The Liebke Ratings: Australia vs India, second ODI

Got it, tks. Labuschagne’s is only tortured because the original name was subjected to even weirder, ear-grating Dutch pronunciation when it became an Afrikaans name.

The Liebke Ratings: Australia vs India, second ODI

Too right, no one prior to this series put him in the same bracket as Maxwell, Gilchrist and Hayden in terms of fast scoring.

The Liebke Ratings: Australia vs India, second ODI

Nice one Dan. Though I wouldn’t agree that Finch smashed the Indians around the park. Looked laboured compared to Warner and most of the batsmen on either team, but still helped lay a strong foundation. Didn’t get “Hen-reek-us-Shane” – maybe it’s a generational thing…

The Liebke Ratings: Australia vs India, second ODI

I’m sure you right about this Ronan, although the couple of times I saw him in the recent IPL he was a long way from being as fluent as he was on Friday.

A heavy T20 diet's given Steve Smith's batting an extra gear

Seems like Ponsford, Redpath and Grimmett were at the height of their powers at the time of their last Test. I had the misfortune to be at the ground for day 2 of Waugh’s last match – India scoring about 370 for the loss of only 2 wickets on a batting paradise, Tendulkar batting all day. Australia did a pretty good job of chasing 443 to win, scoring 350 odd for 6 in 94 overs, including Waugh’s 80. Looks like a miscalculation by India in retrospect.

Baggy green swansongs, Part 1: Going out with a bang, not a whimper

Fair point!

Batting firepower and rusty fielding dominate as Australia belt India

Could well be the case Paul. They didn’t look like they had to up the ante at that stage.

Batting firepower and rusty fielding dominate as Australia belt India

Actually he came about 38th in the batting averages at the WC, Paul, and 4th in the Aus team. But his 2015 WC was great – first among Aussies and 6th overall. Has a very good record overall.

Batting firepower and rusty fielding dominate as Australia belt India

Is there any scenario whereby Australia was at risk of not qualifying for the World Cup? Does that mean if we lost a lot of games and someone like Ireland or Afghanistan who we never play won a few, we might miss out?

Batting firepower and rusty fielding dominate as Australia belt India

Don’t think India were much more ragged than Australia except for going too hard in the early batting. Fielding wasn’t much worse. Finch and Warner found it tough going early to get away Shami and Bumrah, whereas it looked like a breeze for the Indians until they got carried away, and Starc was terrible. Not sure why Stoinis’s duck is such a big issue while Marnus’s failure isn’t (answer: neither, it’s too small a sample). But agree that Zampa and Hazlewood were excellent, and Smith played possibly his best ever ODI innings.

Batting firepower and rusty fielding dominate as Australia belt India

I’d be very happy with the RoW bowling attack selected, though I think Imran’s amazing record relates in particular to his record at home – average of 19.8 in Pakistan, 16.8 in his last ten years. Has to be some question marks over the umpiring methinks. I think Barnes’ and Voges’ small number of Tests probably should exclude them, given that you are breaking down those small sample sizes even further. Who would be the next in line for Australia – Trumper?

Analysing Australia’s Test cricket winners: The best bowlers and overall teams

I have vague childhood memories of grainy black and white coverage on the ABC and the seeming impossibility of getting Boycott out. While Ian Chappell ushered in a more successful era after the dip in 1969-70 his chances were greatly helped by the arrival and flourishing those three greats you mentioned – brother Greg, Lillee and Marsh, and his own improvement as a batsman (he had an ordinary record to that point. And remember only South Africa had actually beaten Australia in the previous five years and most likely would have done so again a year later if the tour to Australia hadn’t been cancelled. One small typo Pat – Illingworth was the first English skipper to regain the Ashes in Australia since Jardine, as opposed to retaining them (which Hutton had done).

The 1970-71 Ashes: 50 years on

The big change in the IPL was that he finally pulled off some finishing innings coming in at 5 or 6. Ponting says he’s improved hugely so maybe it’s promising for the ODIs – though his bowling will be a weakness.

Five key questions ahead of Australia’s ODI and T20 series against India

Pretty much illegal as well. ODIs were supposed to be protected for FTA under the anti-siphoning legislation, but Seven and Fox were allowed to get away with a laughable manoeuvre whereby Seven ostensibly bought the rights but sold them onto Foxtel.

Five key questions ahead of Australia’s ODI and T20 series against India

No doubt Max, I was interested to see a few comments implying that people could judge the lock’s work in the scrum while watching the TV coverage, while I imagined it was hard to tell who was contributing what just from the TV vision.

Rob Simmons is not lazy

Can trained eyes like your good self actually tell when a lock as opposed to the prop is responsible for a good scrum? Genuine question?

Rob Simmons is not lazy

Not so sure they will infringe more 30-40 metres out from the line Geoff. The prospect of a lineout near the goal line is also a reasonable disincentive- possibility of 7 points even if it might be less likely than the 3 points going over. If it’s not exactly equal as a disincentive, it’s surely well above 50% of a disincentive. You could also consider more options to resume play than just the lineout – eg scrum or tap. My view is that rugby simply hasn’t evolved from the original structure of the game where kicks for goal were more important than the tries.

The Wrap: Why Test rugby and Newcastle just don’t go together

Great summary as usual Geoff. And spot on regarding the need not to obsess about TMO decisions, which can make the perfect the enemy of the good. There are always enough head scratching decisions with scrums and rucks – and offsides in defence – to make it clear they don’t get it right all the time anyway, the rub of the green is always a factor.

But at the risk of flogging a dead horse, this game highlighted for me the stupidity of the 3-point penalties from 40 -50 metres from goal – seldom a reflection of territorial dominance, unnecessary as a deterrent, time wasting and encouraging defensive and negative play. Without detracting from the result or making excuses, Sanchez had about 4 kicks from that distance, Hodge one or two also. The penalty goals that Hooper turned down were the result of real attacking pressure, and Argentinian errors in the red zone. If Argentina were restricted to goal kicks inside the 22, rather than feeding off oppo errors midfield, maybe they would be more adventurous and we would have more tries? Admittedly it would place an even greater onus on having a good lineout, but that’s not a bad thing – requires good teamwork, skill, although some would fear too many rolling mauls.

The Wrap: Why Test rugby and Newcastle just don’t go together

Fair enough. Scores obviously do matter, but I’m more of the school willing to overlook short term scores over a smallish sample size like 3 matches in favour of longer term indicators if someone looks ok and is not getting out to bad shots. But sounds like Burns is in a rough form patch from your description.

Weighing incumbency in a year without Test cricket