The Roar
The Roar

David Lord

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Joined February 2011

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David Lord spends his waking hours keeping abreast of what’s happening in the world of sport around the world and is one of the pre-eminent voices on sport in Australia. David has been deeply involved in two of the biggest sporting stories - with World Series Cricket in 1977 and professional rugby in 1983. In those early days of WSC, David was managing Jeff Thomson and Vivian Richards. Withdrawing “Thommo” from the original WSC ended up in the High Court of England, described by David as “not a top tourist resort”. In 1983 he signed 208 of the best rugby players from Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and France to play an international pro circuit. The concept didn’t get off the ground, but it did force the IRB to get cracking and bring in the World Rugby Cup, now one of the world’s great sporting spectacles every four years.

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This is no advice from the safety of the living room, it’s an insult to suggest it. It’s advice from facing some of the world’s fastest bowlers with no helmet, no chest pads, and no arm guard, but surviving by never being struck on the head, thanks to keeping my eyes on the ball.

Batsmen must realise helmets are not impregnable

Rugbyfan, Rod Macqueen as third selector is my suggestion, not an assumption, based on what he can bring to the table as the proven most successful Wallaby coach in history.
Will Cheika listen to any input from Johnson, or the third selector?
That’s no assumption, like it or not, he has no option. This is a new ball game with Cheika’s sole selection-tactic policy wiped out completely.
What you will see from the Wallabies from now on will be the decision-making of the three selectors, with Cheika answerable to Johnson as the one in charge.

Don't underestimate the Scott Johnson factor

Sinclair, Warren Gatland has already thrown his hat in the ring to coach the 2023 British and Irish Lions for the tour of Australia, but hasn’t put his hand up to take on coaching the All Blacks when Steve Hansen calls it a day after the upcoming Rugby World Cup.
Neither has another Kiwi in Joe Schmidt, the current coach of Ireland.
The two outstanding candidates loom as Ian Foster, Hansen’s assistant since 2011, and Scott Robertson who has revived the Crusaders.
In short, Warren Gatland would be an ideal future Wallaby coach, so Rugby Australia mustn’t waste any time getting across the table to sound out his interest.
But the board is not renowned for getting off its backside, with inertia its key role.

Don't underestimate the Scott Johnson factor

stillmissit, you obviously don’t know Roderick Ian Macqueen, conciliatory couldn’t be further from the truth, he’s a trail blazer in his quiet very effective, and winning, way.

Don't underestimate the Scott Johnson factor

jcmasher, it’s amazing how quickly a footballer can improve a weakness when a selector quietly says to him if you don’t dramatically improve your pass, or catch, or defence etc, you sure won’t be in any 23-man squads until you do.
As for the troublesome power-brokers of the past, they have been made powerless with the new set-up that now rests with Scott Johnson in the chair, Michael Cheika, and a third selector.
There’s no room for anyone else, and that includes the Rugby Australia board butting in.
It’s the best set-up since Rod Macqueen retired as Wallaby coach after beating the British and Irish Lions 2-1 in 2001 having won every possible trophy during his watch, with the exception of a Grand Slam, only achieved by Alan Jones in 1984.
But Macqueen was never given the chance of a Slam among his 43 internationals with 34 wins, as the Wallabies most successful coach in history at 79.07 per cent, with Jones next on 67.74.

Don't underestimate the Scott Johnson factor

You have nailed it stillmissit. George Gregan was right up there among the Wallaby great halfbacks from 1994 to winning the 1999 Rugby World Cup, but fell away alarmingly through to the 2003 Cup final, and even further to the 2007.
My pecking order of Wallaby halfbacks covering their entire careers:
(1) Ken Catchpole (1961-1968-27 caps) – the greatest halfback I’ve ever seen from any country.
(2) Nick Farr-Jones (1984-1993-63) – right behind “Catchy”.
(3) John Hipwell (1968-1982-36) – always a solid performer, never saw him have a bad game.
(4) Cyril Burke (1946-1956-26) – played in an era where internationals were rare, and overseas tours were by ship. A standout.
(5) Will Genia (2009-current-100) – on his day brilliant, and while there have been quieter days, they’ve been minimal.
It’s the Chris Whitaker career that rankles with me. From 1998 to 2005 he won 31 caps, but 26 of them were off the bench playing second fiddle to Gregan.
Yet every time Whitaker came on the Wallaby backline immediately lit up for the rest of the game, his career was wasted.

Scott Johnson to see Scotland succeed before rejoining the Wallabies

JA, appreciate your Macquarie warning.

What's wrong with this season's BBL?

DingoGray, you just don’t get it do you.
“I don’t like Glenn Maxwell”, nothing could be further from the truth. In my book he has the natural ability to be the third best batsman in the country after Steve Smith, and David Warner.
With Smith and Warner suspended, Maxwell should be the best available, but it’s not the case because he wastes just about every chance he’s given.
I long for the day when he plays every ball on its merit, utilising his power when the chance presents itself, and being among the first selections in all three formats.
That’s what Glenn Maxwell’s natural ability demands, it’s only Glenn Maxwell who is stopping that happening which is hardening the selectors against him at Test level.
But it’s never too late to change, even at 30.

How Maxwell and Stoinis can do Australian cricket - and themselves - a big favour

Matt H, you obviously don’t know why bowlers don’t take six wickets in T20, like Pat Cummins does in a Test.
Firstly, they only bowl four overs max, and the vast majority of them this season in BBL08 have bowled half-track trash that’s been pleading to be smashed all over the park.
Take Stoinis in his last BBL for the Stars against the Heat.
Lalor, Doggett, and Swepson bowled him half-track trash, and full tosses, to gift him 43 off 29 opening the batting. Had he batted better he would have smacked far more than just four fours, and a six.
Along came Ben Cutting, and with his very first ball, well pitched up and moving for a change, Stoinis was trapped in front playing across the line.
As for your other charges of my ridiculous comments, it’s not centuries, even half-centuries, that are the criteria, it’s consistency, or in the case of Maxwell, and Stoinis, the lack of it no matter where they bat.
But Maxwell should bat four, and Stoinis five, in ODIs and T20Is.
Both are capable of far better in any format, and I look forward to the days when they prove that point.
And Australian cricket will be the beneficiary.

How Maxwell and Stoinis can do Australian cricket - and themselves - a big favour

jameswm, this is the very last time I reply to you. Shake your head as much as you like, but the selectors have already shown this summer they haven’t the strength of their convictions, and make decisions on the run.
Late addition Kurtis Patterson leap-frogging original selection Will Pucovski was step one, and the later addition of Marcus Stoinis will be the second with Mitchell Starc a shadow of his normal self, bowling all over the shop,
The World Cup, and the Ashes, are far more important than a training run against Sri Lanka, so a Starc rest would be in Australia’s best interest in the bigger picture.
I don’t agree with Stoinis’ selection, he hasn’t the concentration span to be a Test cricketer, but he’s there for a reason which could only be to fill in for a rested Starc.

The selectors are about to dud Will Pucovski again

Just did, never seen you admit yours.

The selectors are about to dud Will Pucovski again

Don Freo, you are on my banned list, but I must answer your question, my mistake.

The selectors are about to dud Will Pucovski again

Mickyt, hopefully the wonderful T Hohns decides to retire.

The selectors are about to dud Will Pucovski again

JamesH, the selectors went against their own thinking for the first Test – it should have been:
Marcus Harris.
Usman Khawaja.
Marnus Labuschagne.
Will Pucovic.
Travis Head.
Kurtis Patterson.
Tim Paine.
Pat Cummins.
Mitchell Starc.
Jhye Richardson.
Nathan Lyon.
With the late addition of Marcus Stoinis, rest Mitchell Starc for Manuka, and have Cummins open the bowling with Richardson.
Stoinis would be first change, and bat him between Patterson and Paine, even though he still hasn’t consistently lived up to his God-given natural talent (December 24).
But those two teams are at least in keeping with the selector’s original squad, and subsequent additions, and no-one has been dudded.

The selectors are about to dud Will Pucovski again

Paul, it’s the entire point I’m making, there’s no-one in this team that consistently treasures his time in the middle so they keep gift-wrapping their wickets to bowlers, and Steve Smith is obviously not there.
Operative word – no-one.

Pat Cummins strikes first, again

For the sake of the discussion, if I give you Paul, and DaveJ, your complaints it’s a very small percentage of the carnage the current baggy greens have created for themselves this summer.
Tough marker?
Not at all. Great batting teams like the two above found a way to keep great bowlers at bay, that’s why they accumulated so many huge totals to win so many Tests.
It was very rare for any of them to gift-wrap their wicket to the bowler.
And it all boils down to how much you treasure your time in the middle.
The greats do it automatically, the lesser lights don’t know how often enough.

Pat Cummins strikes first, again

Really, good chance Joe Burns thought so too.

Pat Cummins strikes first, again

JamesH, in my book every Australian dismissal was self-destruction against Sri Lanka.
Throughout the summer, the vast majority of Australian dismissals have been in the self-destruction category which is both a batsman’s natural ability and mental problem, and a coaching problem.
Self-destruction was a rarity in the Matt Hayden, Justin Langer, Ricky Ponting, Mark Waugh, Damian Martyn, Steve Waugh, Adam Gilchrist, Shane Warne, Brett Lee, Jason Gillepie, Glenn McGrath era.
In fairness, there’s also a massive gap in the two teams in natural ability.
The same could be said for the Mark Taylor, Geoff Marsh, David Boon, Allan Border, Dean Jones, Steve Waugh, Ian Healy, Trevor Hohns, Merv Hughes, Geoff Lawson, and Terry Alderman era even though they weren’t nearly as chockablock in natural talent as the aforementioned.

Pat Cummins strikes first, again

liquorbox, what do these words above mean to you?
Most of their partnership was at a funereal pace, but they were showing the others occupancy and patience can be rewarding.
Head and Labuschagne forgot how they got to the 80s by protecting their wicket.
liquorbox, you are quite right strike rates aren’t important in a five-day Test until two batsmen don’t turnover the strike, become bogged down, then try to pick up lost momentum to play a low percentage, or stupid, shot and head for the shed.
Batting strike rates in Tests are unimportant, but turning over the strike is vital.

Pat Cummins strikes first, again

Quite right Ronan, because there’s no comparison between Cummins bowling first change, and opening, in his last 14 Tests.
You can’t say he’s a great first change bowler as against opening, if he hasn’t opened.
I can say Cummins would have a far better average if he opened the bowling, but that’s all I can do, it’s a matter of opinion, just like yours.
In short, we agree to disagree.

Do Tim Paine and Justin Langer ever look at Pat Cummins' stats?

Ronan, and Prez, Pat Cummins first five Tests over six years, between 18 and 24, were as a raw opening bowler.
In his last 14 Tests, including this one, he’s been first change.
It’s fair to assume that with all that extra experience, and more reliable physical strength compared to when he started, he would be even better with the new ball.

Do Tim Paine and Justin Langer ever look at Pat Cummins' stats?

Not you anymore jameswm. You have the right to comment, I have the right to ignore.

Do Tim Paine and Justin Langer ever look at Pat Cummins' stats?

Wrong again jameswm, it is a habit. I never said Folau was wasted on the wing, I said he was better placed at fullback, a comment that in no way denigrates wingers.
Only you could possibly twist my comment to suit yourself.
Pathetic.

Do Tim Paine and Justin Langer ever look at Pat Cummins' stats?

jameswm, you continue to write rubbish, and continually changing what I actually write.
Israel Folau could play anywhere in the backline, bar halfback, but for mine he’s best at fullback where he has far more room to devastate the opposition.
“Relegated” to the wing is again total rubbish. Why restrict his talents to a quarter of the field, when he has all the field at fullback?

Do Tim Paine and Justin Langer ever look at Pat Cummins' stats?

Not correct Christo, Pat Cummins opened the bowling with Mitchell Johnston on debut against South Africa in 2011, claiming 6-79 to take out the man-of-the-match award.
It took 63 months before Cummins played his second Test thanks to serious on-going back problems, but he still opened the bowling with Josh Hazlewood in four Tests – two against India, and two against Bangladesh.
Along came Mitchell Starc, and Cummins hasn’t opened the bowling since, and that’s his last 13 completed Tests, which is now 14 after yesterday.
Sure Max Walker opened the bowling, but only when Lillee, or Thomson, were injured.

Do Tim Paine and Justin Langer ever look at Pat Cummins' stats?