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The Roar

Kersi Meher-Homji

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Joined April 2009

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Kersi Meher-Homji is the author of 15 cricket books including The Waugh Twins, Cricket’s Great Families, Cricket's Great All-rounders, Six Appeal, Nervous Nineties, Cricket's Conflicts and Controversies (foreword by Greg Chappell). Recently he published From Bradman to Kohli (forewords by Allan Border and Sunil Gavaskar). Kersi has been writing for The Roar since 2009.

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Anindya, What about the terrific Aussie trio of Rosewall, Laver and Newcombe?
Kersi

R.I.P. American tennis

Anindya, I enjoy a debate in team selection and you have raised interesting and valid points. Chris Gayle is my first choice as an opener in limited overs cricket. Just look at his Strike Rate. I would have loved to have Ganguly, Jayasuriya and Dilshan in my team, as also Lloyd, Botham and Kapil. Perhaps one can select two teams from the Northern Hemisphere.
Thank you for making the debate lively.

My World Cup XIs with a difference – Part 2

Thank you Peterj.

My World Cup XIs with a difference – Part 2

Paul, it was hard to leave out England’s Ian Botham as also WI’s Clive Lloyd and India’s Kapil Dev. I would have liked to include this trio with Lloyd as the captain. But I have gone with statistics rather than on my personal opinion.

My World Cup XIs with a difference – Part 2

Thank YOU dungerBob. I try to go for the unusual. A comment like yours makes the hard work so rewarding.
You are correct in saying that the venue could be the decider.

My World Cup XIs with a difference – Part 2

You are correct, Paul. Australia has won most World Cups, five times out of 11.
The remaining six World Cups have been won by countries from Northern Hemisphere; West Indies and India twice each, Pakistan and Sri Lanka once each.
West Indies won the first two WCs. Australia is the reigning champ, having won in 2015.
Surprisingly, South Africa has failed to even enter the Final once.

My World Cup XIs with a difference – Part 1

Thanks all you Roarers for your comments.

My World Cup XIs with a difference – Part 1

Thank you Anindya. Await tomorrow for the Northern Hemisphere team. More difficult to select it as seven countries are involved in it against only three in the Southern Hemisphere team.

My World Cup XIs with a difference – Part 1

Peter, Shane Watson does not qualify by my criteria as he did not score 900 runs nor took 30 wickets in World Cup matches. In 22 matches he scored 643 runs at 53.58 and a SR of 108.06, highest score 94. He took less than 25 wickets. I may add that his SR is very impressive and higher than those selected (except AB de Vilier’s SR of 117.29).
You have raised a good point.

My World Cup XIs with a difference – Part 1

Thank you, David. I am always grateful to you for the opportunity you gave me to write at international level in your magazine “David Lord’s World of Cricket” in 1970s. The Lord’s way.

Jos Buttler is a two-time Mankad loser

DaveJ and Punx, I agree with you. What I had meant was if Warne delivery had hit the pad Gatting would have been given not out. I had explained this in a comment made on Monday. My original sentence in that article was wrong, I own up.

It’s time to change the leg-side no-LBW rule

Oscar, Ashwin was NOT unsporting in doing what he did. Bradman wrote in Farewell to Cricket: “Mankad was an ideal type, and he was so scrupulously fair that he first of all warned Brown before taking any action. There was absolutely no feeling in the matter as far as we were concerned, for we considered it quite a legitimate part of the game. I always make it a practice when occupying the position of a non-striker to keep my bat behind the crease until I see the ball in the air.”
Kersi Meher-Homji

Ravi Ashwin's IPL howler might not be that bad

I agree with your views hundred percent, David. Don Bradman had written in ‘Farewell to Cricket’: “Mankad was an ideal type, and he was so scrupulously fair that he first of all warned Brown before taking any action. There was absolutely no feeling in the matter as far as we were concerned, for we considered it quite a legitimate part of the game. I always make it a practice when occupying the position of a non-striker to keep my bat behind the crease until I see the ball in the air.”
Kersi

Jos Buttler is a two-time Mankad loser

Jimbob, what about a batsman moving his pad toward the off-side and the ball hitting it just after it pitches. Isn’t he given out if the umpire thinks it would have hit the stump?

It’s time to change the leg-side no-LBW rule

I see your point, Chris. Anyway, a good clean debate.

It’s time to change the leg-side no-LBW rule

Yes Pope Paul VII, that is exactly what I meant. Thank you.

It’s time to change the leg-side no-LBW rule

Scott, I agree that umpiring is the hardest job. One can’t please everyone.
My grouse is against this particular law which is unfair to leg-break bowlers.

It’s time to change the leg-side no-LBW rule

Thanks for proving my theory for more series in 2018-19. You are knowledgeable and far from being a nuisance!

When centuries won Test series

Ah, what a shame! A quartet of centurions missed by a solitary run!

When centuries won Test series

Interesting addition, RobPeters. Thanks.

When centuries won Test series

JohnB, yes; Test cricket springs many surprises.

When centuries won Test series

Thank you DaveJ and Rajesh Kumar.

When centuries won Test series

Good observation, Anindya.

When centuries won Test series

You are correct, Bush. Over all, my “theory” does not hold true. I was referring only to these successive Test series — Australia vs India and Sri Lanka and SL vs South Africa played in succession within three months. A quirky observation in these three series, not an established fact. More often than not, bowlers win matches.

When centuries won Test series

Thank you, Paul. My hats off to the Sri Lankan cricketers.

When centuries won Test series