The Roar
The Roar

Josh Miller

Roar Rookie

Joined January 2014

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Living the dream

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Guys, appreciate the feedback. I’m enjoying the passion on this issue, though not the cheap shots at my fathering capabilities. For those querying the research (or apparent lack of) on which I’ve based my opinion, the young fella mentioned in the article has been keeping score in his footy up until this year. I have spoken to a number of parents on this and related issues, and though this article is my personal opinion, it almost acts as a collaboration of their views.
On the suggestion that the scoring absence is in place for skill development, what do they do at training? Or in the backyard with Dad? Contrary to someone’s belief here, I spend hours on end in the yard with my little bloke practising skills and the rules of the game. I understand not all parents have the yard space or privilege of time to spend doing this. I’m lucky that I work and live on a farm. As an aside, this also allows me the time to coach local sporting teams. All of whom are young, and all of whom understand winning and losing. Yet, unremarkably, all have fun. I think – and hope – the days of the pushy, “Damir Dokic’ type parents are gone. We can all agree on this.
As for the altered rules for juniors, of course they require different rules, especially involving physical contact. That is protecting our kids, not sheltering them.
Again, appreciate the feedback, keep it coming. It seems we all want the same result from junior sport – participation and enjoyment, with future stars developing. We just have different ideas on how to achieve it.

Kids need to learn to win and lose

Good read mate. Don’t forget though, re the Brownlow, Corey McKernan polled the most votes but was disqualified in the late 90’s, bucking the midfielder trend of vote-getting.

10 things I want to see in the AFL in 2014

Roger, I can’t argue with your suggestion of B Stokes as England’s best, but for mine he just missed too much of the series. Very impressive though.

What I’m trying to share is that perhaps some sections should support our sportspeople from scratch and not have them have to earn the right not to be jeered by their own. It grates me (clearly).

These same sections should not sit quietly and politely, arms in their lap, but a bit of selectiveness as to when and what to jeer wouldn’t go astray, and perhaps even have an effect again.

I’m not a prude, you all make valid comments, and it’s interesting to hear other perspectives. I’m a stockman, and normally reserve my opinions for the kelpies, so a bit of debate is bloody refreshing!

Too much jeer, not enough cheer from Aussie crowds

Aust Rules, you are right in saying Broad was happy being the villain – though I doubt he had much choice! Booing the opposition isn’t a crime, and of course can add to the entertainment value of attending a sporting contest when called for, but attacking our own? That’s where some seem to confuse passion with petulance. Jeering happens so readily now that its lost nearly all its effect and has gone from ‘theatrical’ to downright distasteful in many instances.

Too much jeer, not enough cheer from Aussie crowds

Steve, at no point have I mentioned any crowds other than Australian, for what it’s worth I don’t think we’re the worst out there. However, surely we can’t think it’s acceptable to boo our national captain when he walks out to bat? That was plain embarrassing. And, for interests sake, who do you regard as England’s best contributor during the Ashes?

Too much jeer, not enough cheer from Aussie crowds

Correct

Poms red-faced and bare-bummed

Thanks mate, no point bashing poor old Poms anymore this year! I reckon my under 14s coach was the first time I heard the term ‘Michelle’, about 17 years ago. And I reckon I was playing under 16s by the time I worked out what it meant.

Poms red-faced and bare-bummed