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Tigerbill44

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Joined May 2017

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Iftekhar al khan Pataudi played for both eng and India (possibly 3 tests each) and hence was qualified to represent two teams.

When ten is the limit: Part 1

The Healey vs Marsh debate came in to prominence when the experts of cricinfo selected Healy as the best Aus wk of the 20th century. The main point was Healy’s keeping in Warne’s bowling.
Marsh never had much chance to keep wicket to ra eally great spinner.
But Ian chappell did mention that he was much impressed by Mrash’s keeping with one of the left arm spinners (probably inverarity) bowling over the wicket to the right handers.

A Test team of my childhood heroes: Part 2

I am a big fan of Hodge. But, I have reserved a bowling spot for an Australian. Even then, I have to chose between Bob Massie and someone mysterious.

When ten is the limit: Part 1

Thanks. Yes, sorry about the mistake regarding Donnelly.

When ten is the limit: Part 1

Ehteshamuddin. a right arm medium pacer did pretty well for Pak in the 5 tests he played between 1979 and 1982. But, he was almost 30 when he made his debut.
His last test was at the headingley, he certainly created a bit of problem for the TMS commentators.
They pronounced his name as Ehtesha- muddin when it really is Ehtesham- Uddin.

A Test team of my childhood heroes: Part 2

I was a bit disappointed with Hoggy on the final day of the Calcutta test in 1979. set a target of 247, India finished with 4-200, Geoff Dymock took all the wickets. At one stage India were 3-70. I felt that with a bit more effort from Hogg and the spinners, the Aussies might have won the match.

A Test team of my childhood heroes: Part 2

Mudassar’s batting average of 38 in tests is ok without being brilliant. certainly his bowling helped him keep his place in the team. In the early 80s it was common for him to open the bowling in home tests so that the Paks could play three spinners.
He certainly enjoyed little success outside the subcontinent. 9 of 10 his 10 tests hundreds were in South Asia. He has a double hundred, but perhaps his best knock was 152* against India at Lahore when he carried his bat through the innings.
At faisalalbad in 1984, he became the first batsman to be dismissed on 199 in tests; it was against india.

A Test team of my childhood heroes: Part 1

The problem for Randall was that he was basically a no 5 or no 6 bat. But he was often used as an opener or as a No.3. In his last test against WI at edgbaston he batted at no3, scored 0 and 1 and was dumped permanently.

A Test team of my childhood heroes: Part 1

Yes, Randall failed to lvie up to the hype. But I think he did score 150 against Yallop’s men in 178-79 series, possibly as SCG.

A Test team of my childhood heroes: Part 1

well as I said right at the beginning, childhood heroes are not always based on expert analysis. The centenary test was the first top class international match I watched on Tv. and he certainly played a great knock there.

A Test team of my childhood heroes: Part 1

Talking about Wimbledon, I think an Aus pair MaCnamara and MaCnamee won the doubles title in 1980; if I remember correctly. The Woodies came later, I believe.

A Test team of my childhood heroes: Part 1

He certainly was one of my favorites. But he will only get an honorable mention in my team, not a place in the starting XI.

A Test team of my childhood heroes: Part 1

great research work .

Analysing Australia’s Test cricket winners: The bowlers

yes I grew up in the black and white days as well. I BTV started color TV in 1980. I first saw it in my neighbor’s house in 1982 during the WC soccer. I think we had color TV in our house in 1984/

A Test team of my childhood heroes: Part 1

Bjorn Borg at Wimbledon was something like Nadal at the French open nowadays. Bjorg had to win because it was Wimbledon. Also won 6 French titles I believe.

A Test team of my childhood heroes: Part 1

Anyone trying to guess the Aus quickie and the Pak quickie should remember that the AUS wk is the only great player in my team.

A Test team of my childhood heroes: Part 1

Thanks to everyone for their comments. The remainder of the team will include two Bangladeshi cricketers. Neither of them played test cricket; and are not very familiar names.
There is an Aus wk, an Aus quickie and a Pak quickie.

A Test team of my childhood heroes: Part 1

No Pom has made my list, although Derek Randall came close. As I mentioned in the article, BTV showed the highlights of the MCG match.

A Test team of my childhood heroes: Part 1

* quite common

The history of India tours to Australia

When the subcontinent was divided ,the biggest divisions came in the two great provinces, Punjab and Bengal. There were divisions elsewhere, but they were minor in comparison.
The Paks were offered one of the two major cities; Lahore (Punjab) or Calcutta (Bengal).
Their leaders opted for Lahore. Certainly worked well for their cricket future.

The history of India tours to Australia

Way back in 1947, after learning that Lahore would go to Pakistan, Vijay merchant rightly predicted that India would struggle for pace bowlers for decades.

The history of India tours to Australia

Great comments. But I don’t think Amar Singh was Sikh. I am no expert on this subject, but the surname Singh is quite among the Rajputs as well.

The history of India tours to Australia

Excellent read, enjoyed it.

The history of India tours to Australia

Great read as usual.

Analysing Australia’s Test cricket winners: The best of the best

Great read. Enjoyed it.

Batting in Australia: Horses for courses, hoodoo venues and home-town heroes