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Tipsy McStagger

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Joined October 2017

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My drinking team has a rugby problem

Published

Comments

Hi Morsie, Hooper is a gifted athlete and a very good 7. My opinion is, and many will disagree with me, is that Samu is a smarter player. It will be very interesting as to who Rennie picks. Hooper may well prove me wrong and in the process show that he was constrained by his previous coach…

The biggest challenge facing Dave Rennie

Hi Soapit, he has been playing mostly at 8 for the Brumbies. I would not consider him an international 6 but it could happen depending on the game plan. Just a gut feel I have about Rennie picking him at 7

The biggest challenge facing Dave Rennie

Hi Harry, I agree. Developing forwards take longer than developing backs and the requirements for forwards in International rugby are a step up from Super Rugby. My opinion is that he may be able to pick one pack to hold it’s own at the moment but after that the pickings get very slim. Given recent departures, the locks loom as interesting selections

The biggest challenge facing Dave Rennie

Hi Savant, it may well be that Rennie goes with White and Toomua as halves. I would not be surprised to see Ryan Lonergan and Noah Lolesio as his development picks…

The biggest challenge facing Dave Rennie

Hi Karl, no doubt about Hooper’s work rate. How his personality goes under Rennie’s regime will be interesting. My opinion is that Rennie will prefer Pete Samu at 7

The biggest challenge facing Dave Rennie

Hi Jameswm, Phillip (along with Rodda) is heading overseas, which is a shame, he may well get picked this year though. LSL should be an automatic selection but his partner and back ups will be interesting. Angus Blyth looms as an option for Rennie and I don’t mind what I saw from Trevor Hosea with the 21’s. Do you mind if I forward you my email so I can pick your brain on S&C stuff?

The biggest challenge facing Dave Rennie

Hi Jameswm, that is info I am not privy to unfortunately. I would assume they are doing roughly the same as what you are suggesting. For me, players like Reece Hodge are a good illustration – he looks fit, and no doubt he is fit, but his ability for sustaines repeat efforts and top speed are not good enough. Which is unfortunate because he is a good player. Game plans also factor heavily on how quick players fatigue though

The biggest challenge facing Dave Rennie

Hi PeterK, the ‘complete package’ back three stocks are thin but I would hazard a guess at Andrew Kellaway, Andy Muirhead and Filipo Daugunu being names being mulled over in addition to those you mentioned.

The biggest challenge facing Dave Rennie

Hi PeterK, my view is that Rennie will bring a lot to attack and skills. I have no doubt he is sound defensively but his teams do concede a lot of tries and he does not coach rush defence. I guess we agree to disagree on whether forwards or backs will be his biggest problem. Hooker and locks will prove problematic in my opinion (including back ups). Outside centre will be his most interesting pick for me. I will wager that Irae Simone gets first crack at the 12 jersey under Rennie…

The biggest challenge facing Dave Rennie

Hi Mailaman, I would not be surprised to see names like Bell, Tupou, Valetini, Samu and Wilson in the forwards. The locks will be a problem area and I think it very likely that some left fielders will make the team/squad

The biggest challenge facing Dave Rennie

Hi Jameswm, they have retained the current S&C coach to the Wallabies as he is apparently well regarded. He is usually the person in charge of S&C but he can only do as much/what he needs to as the head coach allows. Repeated explosive short-burst efforts is the goal of most professional set ups these days – lifting big in the gym/endurance is a thing of the past. Problem for Aus though is that their super franchises’ fitness regimes are not aligned with the Wallabies (as is the case in NZ)

The biggest challenge facing Dave Rennie

Hi Pinetree, I am very curious to see what defensive strategy he adopts. Taylor will be pushing hard for a rush defence but combining this with a high tempo attack will push even the fittest players

The biggest challenge facing Dave Rennie

Hi Red Rob, I think Rennie may well go down that path – rumour has it that Noah Lolesio is firmly on his radar

The biggest challenge facing Dave Rennie

Hi Rubbish Surf, I think we will see a much improved kicking game from Rennie, especially in general play, I think it will be very similar to the All Blacks’ kicking game

The biggest challenge facing Dave Rennie

Hi PM, I’ll hazard a guess at the back three because they are so important to his game plan. I think players like Tom Wright, Andrew Kellaway and Tom Banks will be on his radar. As to players who will struggle, it’s hard to say but I don’t think Hooper will be an automatic selection like years gone past

The biggest challenge facing Dave Rennie

Hi Gishan,

Mate, ANYTHING different and original would be a relief. There are many variations to the pod system and your proposed system could work too. This is the beauty of forums that allow open debate (unlike in some coaching dictatorships) – you are able to discuss all possibilities and thereby come up with novel and original ideas

What game plan?

Hi Jeznez,

TK would make a good pod runner. If that was the case, maybe they then need to pick another play maker at 12 or play a crash 12 (like Kerevi who also adds a bit of skill set) and then pick a traditional & skillful 13 (like every other international team)

What game plan?

Hi Nicholas,

Yes, the scrumhalf (Nick White) was defending the tram lines as per the norm and ended up there on general defence. I was referring to the line out at around the 52min mark. It seems that a kick/high kick by the attacking team to the far side triggers Hooper to run back to the near touchline whilst the winger (Haylett-Petty) runs to the far side. Will have to see if this keeps happening in the next test

What game plan?

I think that if they charted the 3-3-3 course from the beginning of the year they would be in much better position now than with the flat-line attack they copied from the old glory days of Randwick.

I think the simplicity in attack would have suited them (I think it would turn very league like – which is what Cheika loves) and at least it would have stretched/stressed the defence more than the 1-3-3-1 as they are implementing it. It should also make turnover/general play defence much easier, provided they pick a decent system. It may well also have required less fitness.

Anyways, just a thought I had and something different to ponder about.

What game plan?

Hi Sinclair Whitbourne,

The flat-line attack could work (and that’s a big could) but there would, as you say, need to be explosive physicality coupled with some very intelligent decoys/gap creation, very deft in-close plays, and a very high skill level. My opinion is that even if these requirements were met, any decently organised rush defence, as is the case with most international teams now, would give it all sorts of trouble.

What game plan?

Hi PeterK,

The 3-3-3, for use by the current Wallabies setup, has been a thought bubble of mine for a few months now (almost similar to the 2-2-2-2 Eddie Jones has run with England at times). Essentially, it would comprise three diamond (or other) shaped pods spread across the field, with the 9 roaming as per usual, the (hopefully fast and aerially capable) wingers staying wide (but coming in to run lines when needed) and the 10, 13 and 15 being the distributors/identifiers of space behind the three pods. Thought this may have been something the current Wallabies setup may have pondered given the type of game Cheika persists with and the players he keeps picking. Basically, it would lend to the game they are trying to play whilst providing better ball security, making it easier to move the ball around and dealing with rush defences. I think the positives/negatives/nuances would at least be worth considering/discussing as an alternative for a team who are struggling to properly compose a 1-3-3-1

What game plan?

Hi Timbo,

Agree with you ‘critical mass’ comment – it’s probably very close to being reached in Australia. Also agree with the losses and competing sports comments. Something radical is needed to fix the system now and to prevent this from happening in the future.

Even if the Wallabies were to have a streak again like they did in the late 90’s/early 00’s (which was all down to Rod McQueen) the same problem will raise it’s head once such an individual/team moves on. We need something that will deliver consistent results/standards and that does not rely on once in a lifetime individuals/teams.

Streamlining is the key to Australian rugby's salvation

Hi Jimbo Lamb,

Spot on. Rugby in Australia skipped a very important step in going straight from amateurism into Super Rugby back in the mid 90’s – a national competition with teams people can identify with.

Streamlining is the key to Australian rugby's salvation

Hi Timbo,

Agree with you on the revenue streams.

Andrew Forrest offered money. I am sure there is also more money from where the shiny new ARU headquarters and outlandish ARU salaries/positions came from…. It is a catch 22 because rugby won’t spin more money/attract more fans until a national AFL or League style competition is put in place but I imagine there will be some pain/loss in getting it off the ground.

I think NZ face similar problems, given the size of it’s economy/population – sure rugby is religion there but sheer numbers suggest they would also be struggling to keep head above water. Interestingly, their “All Blacks brand” is their top money spinner (and I assume this is why everything over there works towards that “brand”). Nonetheless, their ‘central system’ (as suggested in this article) seems to be chugging along fine without much of a hiccup.

Streamlining is the key to Australian rugby's salvation

Hi Old Bugger,

This article was a suggestion for a streamlined system. The EXAMPLE set out in it will need some things to be amended but it is by and large how other successful sports do it… and certainly how NZ does it.

Some of the comments above are taken with a pinch of salt (because the negativity and nay-saying was expected).

An issue of attitude and fortitude I’d say. It kills me to see players in Australia (especially young ones) suffer because the administrators can’t get it right.

Streamlining is the key to Australian rugby's salvation