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Tipsy McStagger

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Joined October 2017

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My drinking team has a rugby problem

Published

Comments

Hi Gishan,

Mate, ANYTHING different and original would be a relief. There are many variations to the pod system and your proposed system could work too. This is the beauty of forums that allow open debate (unlike in some coaching dictatorships) – you are able to discuss all possibilities and thereby come up with novel and original ideas

What game plan?

Hi Jeznez,

TK would make a good pod runner. If that was the case, maybe they then need to pick another play maker at 12 or play a crash 12 (like Kerevi who also adds a bit of skill set) and then pick a traditional & skillful 13 (like every other international team)

What game plan?

Hi Nicholas,

Yes, the scrumhalf (Nick White) was defending the tram lines as per the norm and ended up there on general defence. I was referring to the line out at around the 52min mark. It seems that a kick/high kick by the attacking team to the far side triggers Hooper to run back to the near touchline whilst the winger (Haylett-Petty) runs to the far side. Will have to see if this keeps happening in the next test

What game plan?

I think that if they charted the 3-3-3 course from the beginning of the year they would be in much better position now than with the flat-line attack they copied from the old glory days of Randwick.

I think the simplicity in attack would have suited them (I think it would turn very league like – which is what Cheika loves) and at least it would have stretched/stressed the defence more than the 1-3-3-1 as they are implementing it. It should also make turnover/general play defence much easier, provided they pick a decent system. It may well also have required less fitness.

Anyways, just a thought I had and something different to ponder about.

What game plan?

Hi Sinclair Whitbourne,

The flat-line attack could work (and that’s a big could) but there would, as you say, need to be explosive physicality coupled with some very intelligent decoys/gap creation, very deft in-close plays, and a very high skill level. My opinion is that even if these requirements were met, any decently organised rush defence, as is the case with most international teams now, would give it all sorts of trouble.

What game plan?

Hi PeterK,

The 3-3-3, for use by the current Wallabies setup, has been a thought bubble of mine for a few months now (almost similar to the 2-2-2-2 Eddie Jones has run with England at times). Essentially, it would comprise three diamond (or other) shaped pods spread across the field, with the 9 roaming as per usual, the (hopefully fast and aerially capable) wingers staying wide (but coming in to run lines when needed) and the 10, 13 and 15 being the distributors/identifiers of space behind the three pods. Thought this may have been something the current Wallabies setup may have pondered given the type of game Cheika persists with and the players he keeps picking. Basically, it would lend to the game they are trying to play whilst providing better ball security, making it easier to move the ball around and dealing with rush defences. I think the positives/negatives/nuances would at least be worth considering/discussing as an alternative for a team who are struggling to properly compose a 1-3-3-1

What game plan?

Hi Timbo,

Agree with you ‘critical mass’ comment – it’s probably very close to being reached in Australia. Also agree with the losses and competing sports comments. Something radical is needed to fix the system now and to prevent this from happening in the future.

Even if the Wallabies were to have a streak again like they did in the late 90’s/early 00’s (which was all down to Rod McQueen) the same problem will raise it’s head once such an individual/team moves on. We need something that will deliver consistent results/standards and that does not rely on once in a lifetime individuals/teams.

Streamlining is the key to Australian rugby's salvation

Hi Jimbo Lamb,

Spot on. Rugby in Australia skipped a very important step in going straight from amateurism into Super Rugby back in the mid 90’s – a national competition with teams people can identify with.

Streamlining is the key to Australian rugby's salvation

Hi Timbo,

Agree with you on the revenue streams.

Andrew Forrest offered money. I am sure there is also more money from where the shiny new ARU headquarters and outlandish ARU salaries/positions came from…. It is a catch 22 because rugby won’t spin more money/attract more fans until a national AFL or League style competition is put in place but I imagine there will be some pain/loss in getting it off the ground.

I think NZ face similar problems, given the size of it’s economy/population – sure rugby is religion there but sheer numbers suggest they would also be struggling to keep head above water. Interestingly, their “All Blacks brand” is their top money spinner (and I assume this is why everything over there works towards that “brand”). Nonetheless, their ‘central system’ (as suggested in this article) seems to be chugging along fine without much of a hiccup.

Streamlining is the key to Australian rugby's salvation

Hi Old Bugger,

This article was a suggestion for a streamlined system. The EXAMPLE set out in it will need some things to be amended but it is by and large how other successful sports do it… and certainly how NZ does it.

Some of the comments above are taken with a pinch of salt (because the negativity and nay-saying was expected).

An issue of attitude and fortitude I’d say. It kills me to see players in Australia (especially young ones) suffer because the administrators can’t get it right.

Streamlining is the key to Australian rugby's salvation

Brad Thorn seems to be using the kind of D referred to in this very good article, and the mentality that goes with it, as his starting point in trying to rebuild the Reds (along with the set piece). My opinion is that he has set this as the starting point for the Reds and that he will move on to expanding the attacking game after this basic aspect has been mastered. You never hear him talk about attack or offloads, just about D, set piece and effort. I think he is playing the smart long game with the Reds and I really hope it works out well for both him and the Reds

Jaguares make the case for defence in Super Rugby

There’s a lot of talk about Timu and Tui on this thread – they could not be further removed from New Zealand 6’s & 8’s.

Unfortunately, there is not too much 6 & 8 talent running around in Australian Super Rugby teams at the moment.

If a decent Kiwi coach implemented the 2-4-2 structure with the Wallabies (or at least showed them how to properly play the 1-3-3-1) I dare say they would make the same selection with what’s on offer at the moment.

Is David Pocock's return a solution or compounding the problem?

You are most probably right Nigel… on both counts

Is David Pocock's return a solution or compounding the problem?

Amen

Is David Pocock's return a solution or compounding the problem?

Hi Highlander,

I’ll have a crack at answering your question.

If:

(1) Either Hooper or Pocock have to play 7; and
(2) I can only select from current Super Rugby players that are not injured; and
(3) I assume that Cheika will actually coach the potential out of these guys/get a proper game plan; and
(4) You want NZ type loose forwards

then I’d say Jed Holloway at blindside flanker and Lachlan Swinton at eighthman.

Let the opinions roll in…

Is David Pocock's return a solution or compounding the problem?