The Roar
The Roar

Wally James

Roar Guru

Joined November 2008

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I personally would never buy any Kiwi jersey but I love a good garage sale.

It's time to sort out Trans-Tasman kit clashes

My thoughts exactly. I gather they change kits for financial reasons. No-one would buy them if they stayed the same all the time. Buy once and you don’t need to buy anymore. Tradition lost with that. However the point was made when the W’s jerseys were being decided upon – Australia used to play in marron or blue depending upon in what state the Test was being played. The we played in Green and only changed to Gold when the Boks toured. So much for tradition there

It's time to sort out Trans-Tasman kit clashes

That was not a decoy runner. Put in the language of the Law Book, the penalised player was in front of his man in possession of the ball. He became offside as a consequence. He is not to be penalised for offside unless he obstructs an opponent. He did. Therefore penalty. Another way to look at it is “Why was he there in the first place?” Answer “To make things difficult for the Defence.” Penalty every day of the week.

Commentators divided over controversial obstruction call that cost the Chiefs a try

Novel. Harsh but fair.

Cheika again

And that’s the thing isn’t it Cogs. No one wants to see any player suffering later in life regardless of what team you play for. We are all rugby folk after all. MC would appear to be ignorant of the true facts regarding CTE.

Cheika again

And he wasn’t backward in giving refs a serve in after match coach comments either.

Clause 2.7 of he Code of Conduct for rugby folk particular refers to coaches and says the coach must Accept and respect the authority of a referee… Do not…show unnecessary obvious dissension, displeasure or disapproval towards a referee…. How Cheika was not charged with offences under the code remains a mystery to me.

The Leagueys would have fined him.

Cheika again

It was a bit hard to take, the whole statement re McD and McK. And coming from a position of perceived authority, even more so.

Cheika again

Wax, I remember that line from 2018. He repeated it in the RWC 2019 as I remember. I try and keep an open mind with him but it is difficult.

Cheika again

Cheers Busted.

My recollection is League referees had, for years, said such things as “Keep the 5” (that ages me doesn’t it) or “You are offside. Leave him alone.” or things along those lines. We, on the other hand, said nothing until after we had blown our whistles.

My recollection is that by the late early 1980s Kerry Fitzgerald started to do the same as the mungoes, penalties were reduced by 1/4 to 1/2 when he was refereeing.

I recall the older referee coaches saying “He shouldn’t be saying those things. That is exactly what a coach would be saying. A Ref is not a coach!” However, rugby administrators like Terry Doyle thought it was fabulous. It was then the game changed from a player’s game to a spectator sport.

I’m with you on respective responsibilities. I fail to see how, for example, a Super Rugby player cannot (i) understand the law of offside at kicks in general play; (ii) see he is in front of a kicker and; (iii) stay still until he has made on-side. If he cannot do those things he does not deserve to be a provincial player. It would save a lot of “don’t advance” and “stay” that we hear every Saturday.

The Brumbies have a perception issue only they can address

When I started refereeing in 1979, talking to the players before the match was prohibited. We were taught the rationale was (i) the players should know the law so why should we tell them anything about, (ii) there was insufficient time before a match to discuss all of the laws and (iii) if we mentioned only some of the laws then we would be seen to be inconsistent if we applied others.

The other difficulty was, and remains, mostly players, coaches and referees agree on what the laws say. What is in dispute is what the referee sees. Everyone has their own perspective. If you tell players you are going to focus on one or two particular aspects of the game, it leads to arguments after the match if the referee does not see what occurred or see it differently to the players and coaches.

I was still referee in the mid-2000s when talking to the players before the match became compulsory. It started with a well-intentioned desire to speak to the front row about how they should pack. My thoughts have always been they should already know how to pack and after the first 3 penalties will be in no doubt as to what the Ref wants!

The Brumbies have a perception issue only they can address

Jono, a lot of time and effort went into that. Many thanks. It will take us a while to digest it. It would appear, put simply, that an amateur governance system just does not hold up in a professional world. Rugby hasn’t made the transition well. Geoff Parkes is a well credentialed commentator. I hope he is right when he is says there is movement afoot for change. However, nostalgically, I intensely dislike the thought that a non-rugby body can finance Rugby and, in effect, buy part of our game. I suspect, like Muttaburrasaurus, people like me will become extinct.

How should Australian rugby be governed?

Positional play from Nic was not good. Why do the ref coaches teach them to stand there? Get away from the line of touch and stay on the in-goal side of play. The ball is coming to you, you are not in the defensive line, you can get to in goal quickly and you can see the straightness of throw by the angle of the bodies and arms of the jumpers. Positional play is so important near in goal. Made more important by the absence of law allowing a remedy for a ref getting in the road of a defensive team. The defending team had to cop ref obstruction. It wouldn’t if the ref was in good position.

Nic Berry puts on a perfect screen to help the Tahs score

Leg, times change I suppose but not necessarily for the better!

Referee abuse is eating away at the grassroots of rugby

You make some excellent points Charlie. It occurs to me that there area number of things which can be done. My local Union has issued protocols for how sideline abuse is to be treated. I understand that has been formulated by rugby AU.

We see what happens in Super Rugby games and it drifts down to lower grades, line out ploys, defensive tactics and, dare I say it, referee abuse. My thoughts are that familiarity breeds contempt. I ref should not call the skipper TJ or James or whoever it may be. The ref is not the player’s mate. He is his ref. The player is No 9 or 10. If a ref treats a player in a familiar way he will get it back from the player. Like Dan Coles the other day. The players view of what happened should be neither valued nor sought. Open his mouth and he should be 10 up the field. Then issue the Yellow card. If the world see that refs are not to be questioned on the paddock, spectators might get the same idea. That’s not to say that a ref and a player shouldn’t have a frank discussion over a beer after the match. They should. But the time for having a chat is not on the ground. Firm but fair in televised games should filter down to club level.

Referee abuse is eating away at the grassroots of rugby

Top end is 10+ weeks with a maximum of 52. Hard to read a bloke’s mind but it is at best reckless, possibly intentional. Close to the worst example of that type of thing. I reckon if the judiciary is fair dinkum at least 30 weeks then mitigating factors after that.

Horrifying collision rocks South Africa's Rainbow Cup

Cheers mate.

Tevita Kuridrani banned for Force's Super Rugby final

Sorry to be a pedant Brett. “Any act of foul play which results in contact with the head and/or neck area shall result in at least a mid-range sanction” is the note in the Rugby AU Disciplinary Rules schedule of sanctions. There must be more than just foul play for an automatic mid-range entry point.

6 to 9 weeks is the mid-range penalties with 6 weeks being the starting point for a dangerous tackle.

As for discounts, the Judiciary can only give as much as 50% after taking into account the mitigating factors referred to in the Disciplinary Rules. Mitigating factors include remorse, good record and an acknowledgment of wrongdoing.

The Judiciary must have thought 6 weeks was about right and then given him a reduction of 3 because of mitigating factors. Standard practice for a bloke with a good record although I’m not sure about Tevita.

I agree with you that high level sanctions should bring change. I hope so. If it doesn’t then high head injury damages awards from Courts against Rugby Unions will. We can’t afford that!

Tevita Kuridrani banned for Force's Super Rugby final

No. But I’ve gained some poundage over the years

Get your questions in for Issue 8 of Coach's Corner

JD it’s widely known players are paid by the inch…height, that is.

Get your questions in for Issue 8 of Coach's Corner

G’day Nick. In the last 20 years or so, refs (at Super and Test level have, more and more, taken up a position behind the halfback at ruck and tackle. That position leads to interference in the options and sometime passes of the scrumhalf. Last week’s Reds v Brumbies match being a prime example.

Do coaches arm 9s with preventative measures to avoid this? Do the club powers that be raise it with the Union/Refs associations. Do you feel it has an adverse effect on the game? I realise refs have to stand somewhere but it had previously been considered wise not to stand between players in the process of passing the ball. Am I making a mountain our of a molehill? Cheers

Get your questions in for Issue 8 of Coach's Corner

I enjoyed the read Highlander. I’m with you.
I was taught, in the 70s, that a ref should never talk until after he had whistled and then signalled. He should only speak to explain his decision. Whistle, signal, talk. He should never tell a player something which might prevent an offence (preventative refereeing). The rationale was that the ref would end up being a coach. At that time League refs used preventative reffing. However the number of penalties in Rugby were much higher, on average, than League. One ref in Brisbane, Kerry Fitzgerald starting using preventative reffing. The powers that be enjoyed the lowering penalty count. It then caught on quickly. It is interesting to note that recent ARU ref coaches were reffing in the next generation to Kerry. It caught on world-wide such that by the time I retired a few years ago it was passe.
There is always a balance in these things but I suspect preventative reffing is the cause of some backchat. The more a ref talks, the more he opens himself to comment from players.

What is the role of the modern rugby referee?

G’day Lorry. The last thing I would want is a de-powered scrum. League things are scums only in name. They are just bend-overs with no contest for the ball. It is the contest for the ball in our scrums which is so important. Powerful scums is my motto. But powerful within the laws. Penalties should be awarded for breaches of the laws not because a scrum is powerful.

A powerful scrum gives so many advantages in any event. If it is a powerful defensive scrum, pressure on the No 8 to control the ball, the half taking the ball while going backwards, backline not moving forward when receiving the ball. If it is a powerful attacking scrum, the defensive backs are not moving forward etc.

Is the bajada the way forward for the modern scrum?

Hear Hear In Brief! Giving a penalty to a dominant scrum is like giving a penalty to a driving fabulous tackler. A weak scrum should not be penalised for being weak just as a slow winger should not be penalised for an inability to run around the outside of his opponent. Penalties should be awarded for infringements of Law 19.

Is the bajada the way forward for the modern scrum?

Tommy and Tom are grandfather and grandson. Centre and hooker. Funny thing genetics.

Was Hector Forsayth the best fullback never to play for the Wallabies?

Good yarn Max. Enjoyed it.

Rookie? Perhaps on this site but otherwise not since your days for the victorious Gold Coast Eagles U19 side.

Was Hector Forsayth the best fullback never to play for the Wallabies?

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