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2020 Olympics TV Guide

Matthew Dellavedova is one of the key players for the Boomers at the 2019 World Cup. (Photo by Matt Roberts/Getty Images)

The 2020 Summer Olympics will be held in Tokyo and will run from Friday, July 24 to Sunday, August 9. Here is our full TV Guide on how to watch every event at the Olympic Games in Australia.

As was the case during the last Olympics, the upcoming 2020 Games in Tokyo will be broadcast by the Seven Network, who will spread the coverage over their three television channels. Between Channel Seven, 7Mate and 7Two, it’s expected that once again, more than 900 hours of Olympic footage will be shown on free-to-air TV over the course of the Games, at an average of more than 50 hours per day.

Exactly one year out from the 2020 Olympics, Seven announced some of their plans for the broadcast and streaming of the games, given they are the sole broadcaster holding both TV and digital rights.

Instead of using a paid version of the 7Olympics application they ran with in 2016, the 2020 version will be free with low subscription numbers hampering the company four years ago.

The 2020 version will simply require an email address and some personal details to access approximately 2000 hours of extra content across all of the sports which ordinarily won’t be shown on TV.

The current broadcast deal is expected to end at the conclusion of the 2020 Olympics, however, Seven do have an option to extend their rights to 2024.

More information will be provided as it becomes available on this page, however, it’s anticipated that coverage of the opening ceremony will begin on Friday, July 24 at around 8:30pm (AEST).

It’s anticipated that there will be over 900 hours of Olympics content broadcast on free-to-air television via the three channels mentioned above, but exactly what event will be on at any time is unknown.

We strongly recommend you look at our comprehensive events guide for the Tokyo Olympics, which has every single event and its Australian starting time.

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And remember, The Roar will have comprehensive highlights of the Olympics every day at Roar TV.

Between the free-to-air and subscription coverage, Australian audiences will be able to watch every event from every sport during every day of the Olympics.

Channel Seven first broadcast the Olympic Games way back in 1956, when Melbourne hosted with six hours of live coverage each day. This was the first time the Olympics had been broadcast into Australia, and there hasn’t been one missed since.

Before 2016, the network last had rights to the Games in 2008, when Beijing hosted although this was shared with the SBS who provided the broadcasts and commentary of the lesser-known sports, allowing Seven to focus on the mainstream sports like swimming, athletics, rowing and cycling.

With the exception of those in 2012, Seven have broadcast every Olympic Games to the Australian market since 1992 with Network Ten on board before that.

Most of the events at the 2020 Games, because it’s being held in Japan, will be on at a viewer friendly time for Australian audiences.

Swimming finals will be held during the day from 11am (AEST) each day, while most other medal finals will be in prime time viewing or during the day on weekends for Australians.

In 2016, the broadcast team for the Seven Network was headed up by Bruce McAvaney, Hamish McLaughlan, Mel McLaughlan, Jim Wilson, Kylie Gillies and Todd Woodbridge.

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The main commentators are led by the voice of cycling Phil Liggett who has covered 14 Games and 43 Tour de Frances, Brenton Speed, Mitchell McCann, David Christison and Johanna Griggs among others.

They will also be joined by a number of former Olympians which includes Steve Hooker, Tamsyn Lewis, Dave Culbert, Pat Welsh, Basil Zempilas, Giaan Rooney, Nathan Templeton, Scott McGory, Drew Ginn, Andrew Gaze, Lauren Jackson, Loudy Wiggins, Rechelle Hawkes, Russell Mark, Vicki Roycroft and Debbie Watson.

The 2020 team are yet to be announced, however, you’ll be able to find them here when they are.

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