Ange Postecoglou is the best coach of any code in Australia

Mike Tuckerman Columnist

By Mike Tuckerman, Mike Tuckerman is a Roar Expert

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    Ange Postecoglou is such a talented coach he could solve the Wallabies’ line-out woes and help the Australian cricket team’s top order tame spin on the subcontinent in no time.

    Postecoglou is without a doubt the best coach of any code currently in Australia.

    The only reason the mainstream media fails to laud the Socceroos coach in the way they would a commensurate NRL or AFL tactician, is because they possess virtually no understanding of the game’s global significance.

    That probably explains why outlets like Channel Nine persistently refer to Tim Cahill as ‘Darren’ – a handy tennis player in his day – and label soccer players ‘rioters’ on shows like Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?

    They then scratch their heads and wonder why so few in the key 18 to 49 advertising demographic – many of whom are football fans – watch the network.

    The inability of the average Aussie TV station to comprehend the world around them doesn’t faze our Ange, although it would do him a disservice to suggest he simply gets on with the job.

    Far from merely getting on with it, Postecoglou routinely wills his team to victory in even the most adverse of circumstances.

    Last week’s 1-0 win over the United Arab Emirates in a furnace-like Abu Dhabi just about ranks as the greatest of the Postecoglou era – and there were several key factors behind it.

    Before a ball had been kicked and despite the energy-sapping heat, Postecoglou refused to countenance the possibility of playing for a draw.

    He also persisted with Brad Smith at left-back despite the Bournemouth defender having a shocker against Iraq in Perth, and was rewarded with a pinpoint assist for the winner.

    Lastly, he managed Tim Cahill to perfection – leaving him on the bench in Perth and introducing him with 20 minutes to go against the UAE to devastating effect.

    The Socceroos could have dropped their heads after missing several chances in front of a packed Mohammed Bin Zayed Stadium, but that’s not the Postecoglou way.

    The team’s steely self-belief was forged in that incredible Asian Cup win on home soil, where Postecoglou outmanoeuvred a skilful South Korea despite their star man Son Heung-min scoring with virtually the last kick of normal time.

    Channel Nine have probably never heard of Son – he only scored twice and set up another for Tottenham at the weekend – and far from the presidential reception Portugal received for winning Euro 2016, Australia’s continental triumph was met largely with stony silence by a federal government no doubt baffled by the significance of what had just occurred.

    In spite of it all, or perhaps because of it, Postecoglou continues on his relentless march to transform the Socceroos from a team routinely looked down upon – including in their own backyard – into a genuine football force.

    One of the most impressive things he does is try to condition those around him to stop treating the Socceroos as second-class citizens – even if it flusters the press.

    It’s one thing to be outspoken, but it’s entirely another to do so and try to keep stakeholders onside. Just ask Scott Miller.

    Meanwhile, for all the online mocking of Cahill’s ‘legacy,’ the reality is that he’s now scored an astonishing 48 goals in national team colours – despite making his debut at age 24.

    He will almost certainly rack up the half century of goals on the road to Russia and in doing so, Cahill deserves to be officially recognised as one of the greatest to ever pull on a Socceroos jersey.

    It’s testament to Postecoglou’s man management skills that Cahill has never been allowed to overshadow the rest of the squad.

    So can the Socceroos qualify for Russia? They will invariably take it one game at a time.

    But with a once-in-a-generation coach in charge, maybe it’s time we started to dream big.

    Quarter-finals, anyone?

    Mike Tuckerman
    Mike Tuckerman

    Mike Tuckerman is a Sydney-born journalist and lifelong football fan. After lengthy stints watching the beautiful game in Germany and Japan, he settled in Brisbane, and has been a leading Roar football columnist from December 2008.

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    The Crowd Says (274)

    • September 12th 2016 @ 7:35am
      AR said | September 12th 2016 @ 7:35am | ! Report

      This is a woeful article from a sports journalist. More often Tuckerman has been leading with clickbait first, content/issues second

      There may be a cogent argument to make for Ange being the best coach in Australia right now (a fairly subjective and pointless debate, but there may be a cogent argument).

      However, Tuckerman decides to plunge into some inane code war anti-Channel 9 drivel which has precisely zero to do with his stated topic.

      Did a junior Ch9 reporter say “Darren Cahill”..? I mean, that sounds like a silly mistake, but who cares?

      Predictably this ‘article’ will set off a 100 tangent posts about how the FTA media is against soccer or some other rot. Tuckerman is capable of so much more.

      • September 12th 2016 @ 9:05am
        punter said | September 12th 2016 @ 9:05am | ! Report

        I think he has a point that you totally missed (how surprisingl, give you a hint, it’s in the 3rd paragraph.

        It’s a fairly astute comment if you ask me.

        • September 12th 2016 @ 9:28am
          AR said | September 12th 2016 @ 9:28am | ! Report

          Mark Twain and fools punter.

        • September 12th 2016 @ 10:33am
          Waz said | September 12th 2016 @ 10:33am | ! Report

          Correct 🙂

          Mike being too subtle for a change?

      • September 12th 2016 @ 10:34am
        Mitcher said | September 12th 2016 @ 10:34am | ! Report

        I’d say someone who engages regularly with some of the most rampant warriors on this site yet always claims the moral high ground, is equally capable of so much more. At least you’d like to hope.

        • September 12th 2016 @ 11:25am
          AR said | September 12th 2016 @ 11:25am | ! Report

          Yeah fair call.

          • September 13th 2016 @ 11:01am
            Hulk said | September 13th 2016 @ 11:01am | ! Report

            Why am I not surprised AR refuses to cond3mn ch9. They’re pretty indefens1ble don’t you think?. They employ Edd1e McGu1re, who has made rac1st and h0m0phob1c comments (not to mention m1s0gyn1st1c statements of a V10lent nature).

            And You’re living in a f00ls paradise if you think they don’t share an agenda. And an ant1-football one at that….They did hire him as CEO at one stage, and then there were of course those 100,000 negat1ve stories about football they ran.., edd1e himself is on record making disparag1ng comments about football…the “rioters” thing on hot seat is waaaay late in the piece.

            They’re all one and the same that lot.

      • September 12th 2016 @ 2:32pm
        c said | September 12th 2016 @ 2:32pm | ! Report

        which part of inane code war anti-Channel 9 drivel (apart from darren comment) did you dislike

      • September 13th 2016 @ 4:43pm
        Perry Bridge said | September 13th 2016 @ 4:43pm | ! Report

        I saw the headline and thought it might be a nice article about Ange (who is reasonably well profiled in Melbourne town – often on SEN and SportsRSN).

        In my mind – despite not being an NRL follower – I pondered whether Tuckerman has any notion of the quality of Melb Storm boss Craig Bellamy (likely the best coach out of NRL and AFL) or whether Tuckerman has any idea of the grass roots path trod by Western Bulldogs coach Luke Beveridge who guided St Bedes Mentone in the Amo’s (VAFA) to the C, B and A grade premiership in successive years which would have been regarded impossible before it was done and now has presented the Western Bulldogs into the finals in each of his first 2 seasons as an AFL head coach.

        But – no – the headline is largely false advertising on this article.

        A lot about channel 9. And not a lot about Ange.

        What Mr.Tuckerman seems to fail to realise is that the commercial networks in Australia broadcast in Australia. To the Australian domestic market. This means that most Australian’s would also fail the “What would you do about Aleppo” test as well.

        This isn’t so bad – most Australians can’t impact what’s going on in Syria and have enough trouble working out whether we need a same sex plebiscite or not so soon after the census went belly up and unsurprisingly this week Ticketek has been over run by demand for AFL tickets which only seems to happen this time every year. So – ‘international significance’ is only so relevant.

        A lot of things are of international significance. The Great Barrier Reef is and yet it gets taken for granted. The west Victorian basalt plains. The Mitchell River silt jetties. But – they aren’t of international significance to everyone, nor of domestic significance to everyone. That in itself is not an argument winner. But Mr.Tuckerman still wrestles with it.

        Domestic significance is pretty easy to read in the channel 9 context – home to the NRL and international cricket. The Socceroos are pretty well invisible on FTA in Australia, along with Aleppo although if you watch SBS World News or ABC (Ch.24) you might find out that it’s not a crude soft ‘B’ reference to a Lebanese Australian.

        • September 13th 2016 @ 10:49pm
          pacman said | September 13th 2016 @ 10:49pm | ! Report

          You have pretty well nailed it Perry.

          We are an insular nation, still suffering from cultural cringe and an inferiority complex after more than a century as an independent nation. To counter these deficiencies, we adopt the approach of being “best in the world”, which is all very well except that the rest of the world rarely recognize that we are occasionally almost as good as we claim.

          My wife comes from a RL background (father a Kangaroo selection in the 1930’s), and coming from country NSW circa 1970, she was unaware soccer existed. Until, that is, I foolishly allowed myself, after a nine year absence, to be drafted into the local soccer team a year after our marriage. Her first observation: “You don’t kick the ball as hard/far as the other guys.”. My reply did not convince her (“I try to kick the ball to one of my team mates.”).

          That pretty much sums up our national encounter with the world game. Just as difficult for us, as a nation, to understand football as it is for us to understand that we are an insignificant participant in world affairs. Malcolm Fraser’s biggest regret was that Australia did not have an impact on world affairs.

          Ange has only one competitor as our top footy coach, and he comes out well ahead of his Rugby Union counterpart. On a world scale, he simply has no other competition. NRL, huh? AFL, huh? Neither rate outside of Australia.

          Australia doing well at the World Cup will gain us far more international recognition and respect than will the combined efforts of our politicians, business people, RU, NRL, AFL players, netballers, cricketers, swimmers, scientists, medical researchers,etc.

          • September 14th 2016 @ 11:16am
            Maxiruis said | September 14th 2016 @ 11:16am | ! Report

            It is funny how, with just a few edits, the rants of the self-ignorant can be made sense of..Edits in CAPITALS….enjoy 🙂

            “We are an insular nation, still suffering from cultural cringe and an inferiority complex after more than a century as an independent nation. AS A RESULT OF these deficiencies, we adopt the approach of being “best in the world”, which is all very well except that the rest of the world rarely recognize that we are occasionally almost as good as we claim.

            My wife comes from a RL background (father a Kangaroo selection in the 1930’s), and coming from country NSW circa 1970, she was unaware soccer existed. Until, that is, I foolishly allowed myself, after a nine year absence, to be drafted into the local soccer team a year after our marriage. Her first observation: “You don’t kick the ball as hard/far as the other guys.”. My reply did not convince her (“I try to kick the ball to one of my team mates.”).

            That pretty much sums up MY WIFE’S FIRST encounter with the world game. Just as it is difficult for SOME OF us, IN THIS nation, to understand AND APPRECIATE MULTIPLE football CODES, it is DIFFICULT for SOME OF us to understand that we are an insignificant participant in world affairs. Malcolm Fraser’s biggest regret was that Australia did not have an impact on world affairs.

            PEOPLE WHO STILL SUFFER FROM THIS CULTURAL CRINGE AND INFERIORITY COMPLEX MIGHT SAY SOMETHING AS NONSENSICAL AS “Ange has only one competitor as our top footy coach, and he comes out well ahead of his Rugby Union counterpart. On a world scale, he simply has no other competition. NRL, huh? AFL, huh? Neither rate outside of Australia.”

            PEOPLE WHO SUFFER FROM THIS INFERIORITY COMPLEX AND CULTURAL CRINGE BELIEVE Australia doing well at the World Cup will gain us far more international recognition and respect than will the combined efforts of our politicians, business people, RU, NRL, AFL players, netballers, cricketers, swimmers, scientists, medical researchers,etc.”

            • September 14th 2016 @ 5:56pm
              pacman said | September 14th 2016 @ 5:56pm | ! Report

              Wow, rather a twisted response, but you can only do your best.

              • September 14th 2016 @ 9:28pm
                Maxirius said | September 14th 2016 @ 9:28pm | ! Report

                Thanks pacman, me inserting 30 words into you post to subtlety twist your response was rather clever I agree

                Alternatively, it is im sure perfectly uncringeworthy and post inferiority complex to relate your wife’s 1970’s ignorance of soccer to world affairs and to assert that Australia doing well at a soccer World Cup will gain us more recognition and respect than everything!

          • September 15th 2016 @ 12:11pm
            Perry Bridge said | September 15th 2016 @ 12:11pm | ! Report

            I actually don’t believe Australia doing well in a FIFA WC will deliver anything extra to Australia – – why should it? Does finishing top 10 or top 5 in the Olympics?

            What Australia needs to be careful about is trying to be ‘just another nation’ – – because we aren’t. Certainly in economic market size we are insignificant and can’t sustain an auto manufacturing industry.

            Were Australia NOT home to the AFL and NRL then don’t believe for a minute that soccer would automatically absorb all the slack – because that ignores the cultural heritage of especially AFL (dating Aust Football back to 1858) and the culture impact of the Sydney-Melbourne rivalry that has delivered Australia this footballing landscape.

            The fact that the A-League is a top 15 soccer comp on world standards an yet comes in 3rd or 4th behind RU or ahead of RU in Australia is an example of the concentration of global soccer talent/money consumed within the top half dozen leagues. Australia could never compete on that ‘stage’. Cricket has been different up to this new era of T20 ‘leagues’.

            The cringe is annoying. Australia has much that is great, both positively and negatively (history). What annoys me is people wishing Australia to be more ‘watered down’ – – I’m thankful that soccer doesn’t dominate 10 months of the year as it does in England. There is more to life in Australia. Perhaps though we can learn from the Brits and run a national lottery to fund Olympic gold hunting.

            But – I still ponder just how Australia doing well in a FIFA WC is supposed to benefit Australia as a nation?? Perhaps it’s seen as the best way to leverage ourselves into the consciousness of nations who have such a single focus sporting view that it’s their ignorance that we are hoping to appeal to – – which to me is cringe worthy. Race to the bottom stuff.

            • September 15th 2016 @ 12:25pm
              Nemesis said | September 15th 2016 @ 12:25pm | ! Report

              On what imaginary land of delusion is “A-League a top 15 soccer comp on world standards”? Utter nonsense that can only be explained by a complete ignorance of global football leagues. It’s an Australian phenomenon (I never noticed it when I lived outside Australia) for people who don’t nothing about football think they have all the answers for football issues.

              In foreign countries people who don’t follow football, focus on things they actually like. In Australia, people who don’t have interest in Football, join The Roar football forum every day.

              • September 15th 2016 @ 2:20pm
                Matt Barry said | September 15th 2016 @ 2:20pm | ! Report

                Do soccer fans in other countries lose their bundle at questions on game shows and when the telly gets a star players first name wrong? Or is that just an Australian phenomenon as well?

                Can’t talk for the handful of others who took umbrage at this article (I’m sure like every on line sporting community the Football TAB on the Roar has a few perennial trolls) but I like and am interested in soccer (I call it soccer) and I like and respect Postecoglou. Just because you have a massive chip on your shoulder and aversion to all the other football codes doesn’t mean you own the game.

                And, of course, you’re probably a hypocrite. I searched Roar for “international AFL” and did a quick survey of a few articles. Everyone one of them descended into a code war with soccer mono-maniacs leading the charge.

                Ultimately though, if the Football TAB is pocked with code-war baiting articles at any one period of time then you can probably expect a bit of code-war traffic

              • Roar Guru

                September 15th 2016 @ 2:40pm
                Cousin Claudio said | September 15th 2016 @ 2:40pm | ! Report

                How can you call yourself a professional sports commentator in Australia and pretend you don’t know Cahill’s first name is Tim and then call him Darren Cahill? Especially since Darren Cahill hasn’t played professional, tennis for over 20 years.

                Channel 9 News Sports commentator Ken Suttcliffe would know who Tim Cahill is.
                Most Australians know who Tim Cahill is.

              • September 15th 2016 @ 3:15pm
                Perry Bridge said | September 15th 2016 @ 3:15pm | ! Report

                The A-League generally sits around 15th in average attendances for Association Football leagues world wide.

                I’m not such what that suggests more about.

                And in doing so – on a table of outdoor field sports it is place behind (in Australia) the AFL, BBL, Superleague(*) and NRL. So, on attendances a global top 15 is #5 in it’s own homeland.

                Does this satisfy you query?

                If not – then feel free to discuss further. Sure – perhaps on other metrics it’s well off – however – this isn’t imaginary.

                And perhaps it is an Australian phenomenon that people are probably overly focussed on sport (as distinct to politics, civil war, religion, snow/ice sports etc) such that a multi sports focus site such as theRoar is actually going okay. Get over it – THIS IS Australia.

                #Cousin Claudio:
                Due to budget cuts in AUstralia you’ll often see non sports specific commentators with special comments experts. It’s simple then for someone to have a slip of the tongue on a players name – no matter how famous. Especially commentators who have been around 30 or 40 years. I still get amazed by ‘Bruce’ and his capacity to get up for Olympics after Olympics and seemingly get it right.

                #Matt Barry
                You’re correct – any article on international AFL or overseas article referencing AFL will attract a bunch of NRL boofheads claiming AFL to be soft and Soccer boofheads claiming it’s not ‘football’. But – on your point of ‘code war baiting articles’ – you are so very correct such that if certain posters didn’t exist then it would actually be necessary to invent them!!

              • September 15th 2016 @ 3:34pm
                Nemesis said | September 15th 2016 @ 3:34pm | ! Report

                If you’re ranking quality of sport based on average crowds you don’t deserve any attention on a sports forum. Quality of football is very subjective but, if markets are deregulated and there is reasonably free movement of workers across borders, then a reasonable metric to objectively rank quality would be to rank the average salary of workers. The A-League average salary is around $120,000 per annum. That would not rank in the Top 30 leagues of the world. But, the league is only 11 years old, so this is not a criticism. It’s just a fact of operating in a global economy.

                Only Australians would suggest “average crowd” is a way to rank sport. Unbelievable ignorance.

              • September 15th 2016 @ 3:40pm
                Martyn said | September 15th 2016 @ 3:40pm | ! Report

                Is not ignorance at all. In fact calling sport lovers ignorant for not attending is un Australian.
                It’s a good barometer of a sports popularity.

              • September 15th 2016 @ 4:36pm
                Perry Bridge said | September 15th 2016 @ 4:36pm | ! Report

                #Nemesis

                If only throwing money at something ensured quality outcomes – then we’d have no issues with our public health system.

              • September 15th 2016 @ 4:53pm
                Nemesis said | September 15th 2016 @ 4:53pm | ! Report

                To bring up the Health Industry in this discussion is disingenuous. Are ignorant about the issues across the delivery of Health? Or are you trying to make light of a serious situation? Regardless, you can safely assume the best surgeons, barristers, mechanics will tend to be more expensive. This is Economics 101. Of course, this only applies to rational labour markets. So, if an employer makes an irrational decision to pay exorbitant wages to a worker who has no skills then, for sure, high wage does not equate to high quality (eg the NRL players who were recruited to play AFL).

              • September 16th 2016 @ 9:11am
                Perry Bridge said | September 16th 2016 @ 9:11am | ! Report

                #Nemesis

                I suppose then you’re fine with top sports people earning the salaries they do in the NBA, NFL, EPL, etc.

                Personally I feel the world is somewhat irrational with those (in my book) exorbitant wages.

                But – top level sport has for over 100 years attracted money launderers of the highest degree!!

            • September 15th 2016 @ 12:35pm
              Sydneysider said | September 15th 2016 @ 12:35pm | ! Report

              Nice work Perry.

              Yes I don’t hold that view about us doing well in futbol delivering us extra benefit as a nation.

              Being from Sydney, we don’t experience that domination that AFL holds over your city (I’m assuming you are from Melbourne).

              “The cringe is annoying.” I’m assuming you say that the cringe comes from people who don’t like AFL (especially soccer fans)?

              I don’t find the game cringeworthy. I do cringe with the constant cross referencing in the media at the Olympics and other big sportng events with anything to do with AFL. It’s not required.

              Maybe in the states their sports commentators cross-reference the NFL when covering the Olympics and other sporting events… maybe they don’t. I don’t know.

              Anyway, no disrespect to you but Sydney (and Brisbane/Queensland) is different to Melbourne, Adelaide and Perth. AFL doesn’t dominate the sporting or news headlines.

              “I’m thankful that soccer doesn’t dominate 10 months of the year as it does in England. There is more to life in Australia.”

              I can understand your point there, however, conversely, AFL dominating the Melbourne, Adelaide and Perth city and media isn’t something I would enjoy if I lived in those cities.

              • September 15th 2016 @ 3:58pm
                Perry Bridge said | September 15th 2016 @ 3:58pm | ! Report

                #Sydneysider –

                Thanks for your measured response.

                Ironically – when we in Melbourne watch the cricket or other sports on Channel 9 they invariably make cross references to their NRL coverage. That’s networking at play – and Ch.9 re the NRL and Ch.7 re AFL have made huge investments by Australian standards so it’s something we have to live with. Recall when channel 10 was broadcasting AFL they managed to get Australian Idol contestants singing at the AFL Grand FInal!!!!

                AFL dominates Melb, Ade and Perth however – it still hands over the keys to major shared venues for cricket to take up residency (and this happens at grass roots levels too) for the cricket seasons. As it is – cricket is no longer constrained to Nov-March but certainly cricket dominates these markets for a good time. The Melb market will shortly move focus to horse racing which has clean air for most of October up to the Melb Cup week when it peaks. In England – there’s very little clean air – and when soccer takes a break the cricket, Wimbledon and anything else have to bob up and breath very, very deeply indeed.

                “The cringe is annoying” – for me, this is in general the Australian cringe. It seems to be related to a lack of identity and a desperate desire to keep proving ourselves (to someone, for something). The eternal search for happiness which is never satisfied and the irony is upon reflection we realise how much contentment we could have been happy with.

            • September 15th 2016 @ 12:45pm
              SVB said | September 15th 2016 @ 12:45pm | ! Report

              “I actually don’t believe Australia doing well in a FIFA WC will deliver anything extra to Australia – – why should it? Does finishing top 10 or top 5 in the Olympics?”

              This is really subjective. A lot of people like to see how our athletes go on the world stage. Simple as that. They enjoy seeing them perform against others, and measuring themselves to see how we go. It’s also the concentration of nations in events like these, that make them a huge spectacle and occasion. There is an atmosphere. Just because you don’t get or like it, doesn’t mean others have to endure your moans and complaints. All sport is really a competition, and the benefit is in simply seeing the competition and enjoying it. Hopefully someone inspired by the Olympics picks up a hockey stick or some swimming goggles and takes up a sport. That’s another benefit. Kids playing sport.

              What does playing AFL and isolating ourselves from the rest of the world do? One can ask that question. But maybe some people like that. I don’t. I prefer reaching out into other areas and experiencing competition from elsewhere. But if you enjoy that, then good for you. It’s all subjective in the end.

              • September 15th 2016 @ 2:34pm
                Sydneysider said | September 15th 2016 @ 2:34pm | ! Report

                Spot on SVB.

                Ive been watching the Paralympics on 7Two the last few nights and some of the stories from them are mind blowing.

                Google these guys:

                Former F1 and Indy Car driver Alex Zanardi winning back to back gold in the hand-cycling time trial.

                Former combat engineer Curtis McGrath who has made the final of 200m KL2 Sprint para-canoe.

                Extraordinary stories… unbelievable human beings.

              • September 15th 2016 @ 4:14pm
                Perry Bridge said | September 15th 2016 @ 4:14pm | ! Report

                SVB –

                It’s interesting though – seeing how our athletes go on the world stage. With the debate again raised about govt investment in the search for gold. The irony was that most of those burdened with expectation failed to live up to it (not so much winning gold but missing their PB’s by a way as well). Kim Brennan (nee Crow) was a clear exception – she was amazing. Kyle Chalmers was a breath of fresh air – more so because he hadn’t been bashing away at swimming since the age of 6 – for him, it was a sport picked up to keep fit for footy.

                ]Warning – tongue in cheek comment to follow] Given the Brennan is the daughter of a VFL player from the 70s/80s – and Chalmers son of a former AFL player too – – perhaps were Govt to legislate the end of AFL and force all those players into the Olympic sports then perhaps we’d be dominating. Cam Baird (posth VC) was a likely AFL player before being injured and joining the military – so, clearly our military strength is suffering due to the AFL!!

                But how much of that which marks us unique would be lost in doing so.

                Does playing AFL isolate us from the rest of the world? Yes – in many respects it does – however, it hasn’t prevented Australia being a top 32 (making the FIFA WC) soccer side, being world #1 in cricket, having Grand Slam winning tennis players, winning Olympic medals etc etc.
                And – were the good folk at Tourism Australia up in Sydney to actually embrace some of what makes us unique then we might see AFL less of an isolation and more of an attraction.

                Personally I’ve got international contacts and experiences related to Australian Football that most AFL fans have zero comprehension of. Like many things – you get out what you put in.

              • September 15th 2016 @ 5:03pm
                Sydneysider said | September 15th 2016 @ 5:03pm | ! Report

                “Does playing AFL isolate us from the rest of the world? Yes – in many respects it does – however, it hasn’t prevented Australia being a top 32 (making the FIFA WC) soccer side, being world #1 in cricket, having Grand Slam winning tennis players, winning Olympic medals etc etc.”

                True. We finished 10th on the medal table at Rio and we have won international renowned sporting events eg. Wimbledon, US Masters golf, Tour De France, swimming world titles, cycling, rowing etc… heck we even have soccer clubs in the VPL who have some great little facilities eg. Heidelberg, South Melbourne, Bentleigh Greens etc.. Secretly Melbournians enjoy soccer, because if they didn’t they wouldn’t get such big crowds to A-League games, international touring teams, Socceroos matches and even FFA Cup games.

                “And – were the good folk at Tourism Australia up in Sydney to actually embrace some of what makes us unique then we might see AFL less of an isolation and more of an attraction.”

                Sydney is a funny place Perry…. I’ve lived here my whole life and it is completely different to Melbourne. Same for Brisbane and Queensland.

                Anyway, good posts.

              • September 16th 2016 @ 12:01pm
                Perry Bridge said | September 16th 2016 @ 12:01pm | ! Report

                #Sydnersider

                As Eddie McGuire pointed out after he returned to Melbourne after a stint high up at Ch.9 in Sydney.

                Sydney isn’t just another city, it’s like another country.

                I used to take annual family holidays to Newcastle (a brother has lived up there and Central coast for 40 years now) – and I recall thinking that the land seemed very familiar, the trees and grass looked the same but culturally it was quite different. Back then though the Hunter St newsagent father of my sister in law also followed Carlton in the VFL. But only rugby or soccer goals were visible. In years since – there’s a greater capacity to spy the full range of football goal posts in Sydney, NSW and SE Qld.

                It is ironic – that there are people north of the Murrumbidgee who very desperately want to hold onto a notion that Aust Football is more foreign to Sydney than something truly foreign (so to speak).

                Soccer has always had a reasonable level within Victoria – although, the irony is there are stories of kids being forced to play soccer for their schools to ensure they had a team when they wanted to play footy with the rest of their mates. These days it’s probably less so – but it’s a fluid situation. There was a massive boost to soccer over the last 10 years largely driven by girls soccer. In the last couple of years AUst Football has got a really big growth boost by girls footy. Even our local Catholic college (St Monicas) which boasted a FIFA approved synthetic soccer pitch and didn’t have a footy/cricket oval on site now is boasting a number of girls Aust Footy teams.

                The main thing is that the kids growing up get to try a lot of different things. I have twin boys aged 13. They aren’t particularly co-ordinated. They’ll never push professional sports. However – they need to find something for fun and fitness and eventually something might ‘click’ for them. There’s no great rush. And – there are still those late bloomers who starting ‘clicking’ around age 16 and can still find their way to the top. Might just be in swimming like Kyle Chalmers.

    • September 12th 2016 @ 7:39am
      Waz said | September 12th 2016 @ 7:39am | ! Report

      Nice article Mike, I look forward to the day when we don’t need articles like this and when we can translate our popularity in the key youth demographic into metrics that the media in this country will have no choice but to care about. Until then we can dream on, and yes – the quarter finals (and beyond) is not an unrealistic dream as a starter 🙂

    • September 12th 2016 @ 7:46am
      Casper said | September 12th 2016 @ 7:46am | ! Report

      Good call Mike. Who can forget his outstanding coaching performance at the last World Cup. Sure the team finished bottom of their group with zero points, but apparently they tried really hard.

      • September 12th 2016 @ 7:48am
        Fadida said | September 12th 2016 @ 7:48am | ! Report

        Second comment in and ze seagulls are following ze trawler

        • September 12th 2016 @ 8:41am
          punter said | September 12th 2016 @ 8:41am | ! Report

          Haha, so harsh yet so true!!!!

      • September 12th 2016 @ 8:07am
        jamesb said | September 12th 2016 @ 8:07am | ! Report

        Casper

        I don’t think it’s easy coaching a team where you only have the players for only a few days at international level. Whereas club coaches in NRL and AFL have their players everyday and still perform poorly at times

      • Roar Guru

        September 12th 2016 @ 8:37am
        Ben of Phnom Penh said | September 12th 2016 @ 8:37am | ! Report

        Casper is correct, his word order is just a little mixed due to it being early in the morning.

        It should read:

        “Apparently the team finished bottom of their group with zero points but who can forget his outstanding performance at the last World Cup? They really tried hard.

        Good call Mike.”

        • September 12th 2016 @ 10:19am
          Ian said | September 12th 2016 @ 10:19am | ! Report

          Fair call.

      • September 12th 2016 @ 11:28am
        josh said | September 12th 2016 @ 11:28am | ! Report

        Maybe Ange could coach the All Australian AFL team for their first match, coming up any minute now surely.

    • September 12th 2016 @ 7:46am
      Fadida said | September 12th 2016 @ 7:46am | ! Report

      I predict a riot with this headline Mike.

      Firstly, Ange is a truly brilliant football coach. I was astounded when a list of the top 50 coaches in the world, compiled by an English publication, omitted him. I have no doubt that the only factor preventing him coaching a good EPL club is his nationality, and lack of renown as a player. Apart from Eddie Howe there is not English coach near his quality. Actually there may well be, but their lack of renown prevents them from progressing up the leagues.

      As for the best coach in the nation? A pointless and inflammatory comment (aka click bait). I have no idea who is the best as I have no idea who the others are. How do you compare a global game to a local sport? Is managing a top 50 team greater than winning 3 consecutive “flags” in a regionally and equalised competition? How can you compare different sports with different ceilings?

      I’d rather you put your energy and very good talents into an article on Postecoglu and his aggressive and positive influence on Australian football.

      Instead this article will be lost in code war slanging. And yes the mainstream media are hopelessly out of touch. Ignore them. Most of the people in the key demographics do

      • September 12th 2016 @ 8:07am
        RBBAnonymous said | September 12th 2016 @ 8:07am | ! Report

        A fantastic post.

      • Roar Pro

        September 12th 2016 @ 8:16am
        Kasey said | September 12th 2016 @ 8:16am | ! Report

        Fadida said:
        “Instead this article will be lost in code war slanging. And yes the mainstream media are hopelessly out of touch. Ignore them. Most of the people in the key demographics do”

        I could not agree with your final thoughts more. Lets just be thankful

        Ange is great.
        As football fans we should be thankful we have him.
        As Australians we should be thankful we have him.

        • September 12th 2016 @ 4:41pm
          Maxiruis said | September 12th 2016 @ 4:41pm | ! Report

          The same guy who said this about A.P…

          “As Australians we should be thankful we have him”

          Refers to our national rugby team as

          “the Wobblies”

          • Roar Pro

            September 13th 2016 @ 8:52am
            Kasey said | September 13th 2016 @ 8:52am | ! Report

            @Maxiruis

            So? what’s your point? I don’t recall seeing you jump in when people refer to the Socceroos as the footballroos. or even worse call football wogball?

      • September 12th 2016 @ 8:20am
        SVB said | September 12th 2016 @ 8:20am | ! Report

        Yes, Casper is already in with another clueless comment.

        • Roar Pro

          September 12th 2016 @ 8:29am
          Kasey said | September 12th 2016 @ 8:29am | ! Report

          @SVB: wait until that prawn that couldn’t bring himself to support the Socceroos(ie his own country) because the evil sokkah was taking ‘resources’ away from his prescious Rugger wakes up. good grief!!

          Fear of a roundball(TM) brings out some interesting attempts at thinking;)

          • September 12th 2016 @ 8:44am
            SVB said | September 12th 2016 @ 8:44am | ! Report

            Ah Lord Brucie. What a classic. Although with LB it is more about jealousy. Casper generally makes comments that shows he has no idea about a lot of things.

            • September 12th 2016 @ 9:17am
              SVB said | September 12th 2016 @ 9:17am | ! Report

              Oh dear. Out they come form the woodwork. I take my comment back. You are at Casper’s level. No idea about the difference between what is a genuine world / global game, and some Mickey Mouse regional competition where you get to feel good because you can call yourself the ‘best in the world’. Stop hiding away in your little corner of the world, and get out there and watch where the real competition is happening Brucie.

            • Roar Pro

              September 12th 2016 @ 9:40am
              Kasey said | September 12th 2016 @ 9:40am | ! Report

              LB. You are a Rugby fan right?
              As I understand it, the Wobblies don’t ever have to ‘qualify’ for the RWC.
              I guess there’s no need when only a handful of former Commonwealth colonies play the game.

              btw: Its colonial-levels of arrogance to assume that the AFC is easy.

              Asia is no cakewalk.
              Even Brazil would struggle to play sexy and winning football in the oven-like conditions that is Abu Dhabi away. We got in and walked away with a very nicely planned out 1-0 for a valuable 3 points.
              You can be anything you like on the internet, Its a shame so many choose to be willfully ignorant regarding football.

              • September 12th 2016 @ 1:10pm
                LordBrucie said | September 12th 2016 @ 1:10pm | ! Report

                SVB- Not sure why cricket and rugby union are Mickey Mouse regional competitions. This weekend Australia played South Africa and Sri Lanka at these sports which are not regions but sovereign nations.
                Kasey- if the Asian confederation is not much easier than the process the socceroos was in before in Oceania when the socceroos had a 2 leg play off match often against South American opposition why is it that between 1974 and 2002 the socceroos qualified for precisely 0 world cups? Suddenly the socceroos qualify for every World Cup since they switched FIFA confederation? Quite the coincidence!
                If Angie coaches this bunch to victory in Moscow in 2018 then I will agree with the premise of this article. However that is about as likely as hell freezing over.

            • September 12th 2016 @ 1:38pm
              SVB said | September 12th 2016 @ 1:38pm | ! Report

              LB

              I was referring more to AFL, and to a lesser extent NRL. Didn’t the Australian cricket team just lose a test series against Sri Lanka in Sri Lanka because they couldn’t handle the tough conditions on the sub continent? Yet you want to rubbish the Socceroos when they have to play in 40+ degrees heat in the middle east. Please stop your bias.

              Also those qualification ties against South America and Asian opposition involve a lot of luck. The reason why we wanted to go through Asia in the group stages is because you can qualify through putting in a good, long campaign. Not just the luck of a two legged tie. There is a good chance we would beat the fifth placed South American team anyway (maybe Columbia). We are as good, if not better these days than the fifth placed South American team. Your beef is more that we are not number one (which is ridiculous with the number of nations that play the game). This should be our challenge to climb the ladder as high as we can. You don’t embarrass yourself by playing your own style and taking to the rest of the world. That’s actually how the rest of the world notices you.

            • September 12th 2016 @ 1:56pm
              punter said | September 12th 2016 @ 1:56pm | ! Report

              LB, I don’t want to blow your bubble, you seem to be doing this yourself, but Sri Lanka is also in the Asian federation that you so dismiss.

            • September 13th 2016 @ 8:46am
              Post hoc said | September 13th 2016 @ 8:46am | ! Report

              Plus qualifying in 2006 for Germany we were in Oceania

            • September 13th 2016 @ 6:12pm
              Marc said | September 13th 2016 @ 6:12pm | ! Report

              Brucie

              Ever been to Namibia? Perennial Rugby World Cup final qualifiers; 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015. In 2 years living there I did not see a single rugby ball. The game is invisible. Football is their game and their passion. And they have only qualified for the African Cup of Nations once.

              Spot the difference; football is the passion like all of Africa and the game that unites countries and divides neighbours, and highly-competitive so it’s difficult to qualify for major competitions. Rugby union is barely played, and if so only by a small proportion of the population, and it’s easy to qualify for major competitions.

        • September 12th 2016 @ 10:22am
          Ian said | September 12th 2016 @ 10:22am | ! Report

          SVB – You have wasted a word putting clueless in front of comment when describing Casper.

          It is a given that his comments are clueless.

          He hasn’t made any xenophobic remarks

          Yet.

          Good to see it appears Flawed Brucie has already had comments removed for no doubt showing his, and Casper’s, shared view of other parts of the world.

      • September 12th 2016 @ 8:31am
        Peeeko said | September 12th 2016 @ 8:31am | ! Report

        Well said Fadida. I bet Mike didn’t write the headline

        • September 12th 2016 @ 8:39am
          Fadida said | September 12th 2016 @ 8:39am | ! Report

          In the second line of the article Mike claims he is the best coach of any code in the country.

          The headline fits the content of the article. It’s a code war detonator

      • September 12th 2016 @ 9:25am
        AR said | September 12th 2016 @ 9:25am | ! Report

        Good post Fadida, and much better expressed than mine.

        Instead of a piece celebrating Ange, the article quickly dissolved into clicky anti-MSM irrelevance. I think Mike has been better of late, but this stuff is truly poor.

        • Columnist

          September 12th 2016 @ 1:33pm
          Mike Tuckerman said | September 12th 2016 @ 1:33pm | ! Report

          AR – it may or may not be useful to note that I’m interested in the concept of paradigm shifts. It’s one of the reasons I like Postecoglou so much.

          I mentioned Channel Nine because these were the umpteenth examples of football (and its fans) being expected to be treated as irrelevant (it’s not the first time they’ve called Cahill ‘Darren’) or with contempt (‘rioters’… really?).

          And I listed a consequence – that Nine struggles to attract a younger audience – because it demonstrates how failing to update prevailing attitudes can have a negative impact.

          Of course this piece was designed to provoke a reaction – that’s the point. I’m never surprised when fans of other sports take exception. I’m more interested in the way a lot of football fans in Australia are conditioned to automatically defer to other sports. I think that’s an attitude Postecoglou is trying to change, and it’s an idea that inspired this piece.

          • September 12th 2016 @ 2:07pm
            Bob said | September 12th 2016 @ 2:07pm | ! Report

            GREAT POST AND I AGREE …. WHERE DO I SIGN UP?

          • September 12th 2016 @ 2:23pm
            AR said | September 12th 2016 @ 2:23pm | ! Report

            Mike, when you contend – “Ange Postecoglou is the best coach of any code in Australia” – and then descend into some rant about channel 9, you instantly change the course and tone of your own article.

            If you actually wanted to debate that question, then why refer to”football (and its fans) being expected to be treated as irrelevant”..?

            I mean, what on earth does that have to do with Ange being our best coach or not?

            As I’ve said, I think debating which coach is “the best” across various different sports is like comparing which car is “the best” across various terrains. It’s a highly subjective and pretty pointless exercise. But it is especially so when it’s needlessly wrapped in narky code-war tiddle.

            • September 12th 2016 @ 4:57pm
              Maxiruis said | September 12th 2016 @ 4:57pm | ! Report

              Right on AR

              I guess it makes sense when you consider it through a psychological perspective.
              If you are suffering from a combination of relevance deprivation syndrome and severe cognitive dissonance than you are likely to make outlandish assertions and than prod at the “mainstream” who’s attention you desperately covert.

              It’s not my favorite sport but I like soccer, support the socceroos and am a big fan of Postecoglou. I know Cahill’s first name and am marginally more inclined to go to some City games this year cos he’s playing. I can’t say I’d stop following the socceroos and liking AP but I am marginally less likely to go to A-League games because I suspect that too many of the fellow spectators share this writer’s “thoughts”

              • September 12th 2016 @ 5:52pm
                Waz said | September 12th 2016 @ 5:52pm | ! Report

                AR/Maxirious – I think you’re singularly missing the whole point of Mikes article. What I can’t figure out is whether you’re doing it deliberately or if you just missed the point?

              • September 12th 2016 @ 5:53pm
                marron said | September 12th 2016 @ 5:53pm | ! Report

                “Get your chip off your shoulder.”
                “I think sokkah fans whinge too much so I’m less likely to go to watch the sport”.
                o_0

              • September 12th 2016 @ 6:02pm
                punter said | September 12th 2016 @ 6:02pm | ! Report

                Sometimes Waz, when one is so blinded by their agendas, one cannot see what is rational & what is not!!!!

              • September 12th 2016 @ 8:22pm
                marron said | September 12th 2016 @ 8:22pm | ! Report

                So, basically
                -soccer fans have chips on their shoulders
                -you won’t go to the a-league because of comments on the Internet.

              • September 13th 2016 @ 7:41am
                Waz said | September 13th 2016 @ 7:41am | ! Report

                lol

              • September 13th 2016 @ 1:41pm
                Maxiruis said | September 13th 2016 @ 1:41pm | ! Report

                Punter, Marron, Waz

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_projection

                I said I felt marginally less inclined to go, not that I wouldn’t go or that it would be rational for me not
                to go because some soccer fans have chips on their shoulders

                Re me missing the point, As AR said:

                “…when you contend – “Ange Postecoglou is the best coach of any code in Australia” – and then descend into some rant about channel 9, you instantly change the course and tone of your own article…….what on earth does that have to do with Ange being our best coach or not?”

                I don’t know, may be it is that if I shared the bizarre persecution complex of a significant sub-set of the soccer society (awesome accidental alliteration) this article would appear to me as being logically sound. Alas, as an “outsider” it reads as non-sequitur nonsense

                1. Ange is the best coach in australia
                2. mainstream media is conspiring against us as evidenced by channel 9 calling Timmy “Darren”
                3. Their preference for the country’s dominant codes reflects an inability of MSM to understand the world around them
                4. Here are some of great the things Ange has done with the Socceroos

                A man, in his head, is the chosen one, destined to save the world. To the rest of the world he is a mad man thrashing around in a straight jacket

              • September 13th 2016 @ 9:22pm
                Bondy said | September 13th 2016 @ 9:22pm | ! Report

                Maxiruis

                Aussie Rules & Rugby League are only semi professional sports here in Australia they’re not professional the average salary for both of those sports is $320.00 (semi professional salaries) where football is limitless you can if good enough earn $100 million a year . Aussie Rules & Rugby League are loose change sports ….

              • September 13th 2016 @ 11:20pm
                Not maxirius said | September 13th 2016 @ 11:20pm | ! Report

                Thanks, bondy

                I’m calling it. 700 plus players earning an average salary (in a salary capped competition) of $320,000 and not doing any other job, supported by bigger operations than all but at best a handful of eoropean and North American club completions is a professional competition. Any definition bar an illogical one that emerges from the fevered long suffering mind of an Australian soccer head not reconciled to his plight would consider the afl and nrl as professional competitions

                2 soccer players earn close to $100 million including endorsements which is of course a mute point to this discussion

              • September 14th 2016 @ 2:50pm
                Martyn said | September 14th 2016 @ 2:50pm | ! Report

                Lets compare like to like.What is the average salary of soccer players in Australia.You failed to mention the top paying soccer players in Australia. Compare that to the top paid AFL and NRL players.

              • September 14th 2016 @ 8:50pm
                Maxirius said | September 14th 2016 @ 8:50pm | ! Report

                Martyn, presumably a-league is even less professional than the afl…..or otherwise (after reading bondy’s response), it is still professional cos in the same code, yet far far away, Ronaldo earns $80million at real….basically if you kick a round ball rather than an oval one you’re a pro cos of Ronaldo and Messi…I know., I’m finding this confusing as well….cheers pal

              • September 14th 2016 @ 5:04pm
                Bondy said | September 14th 2016 @ 5:04pm | ! Report

                Martyn

                You’re forgetting that an Australian footballer can ply his trade abroad where with aussie rules its restricted to Australians and a restricted salary (salary cap) , technically any footballer can be purchased by an overseas club and they can potentially earn what they want or at least a few million a year .

                Aussie Rules is deeply restricted as to where you can play and how much you earn, football on the other hand isn’t …

                We’re not restricted to Australia we’re Global …. Cheers Pal ….

          • September 12th 2016 @ 3:15pm
            Midfielder said | September 12th 2016 @ 3:15pm | ! Report

            ++++999999999999999999 Mike….

          • September 12th 2016 @ 6:46pm
            We've got a live one said | September 12th 2016 @ 6:46pm | ! Report

            So you just described yourself as a troll, and you’re proud of it?

            If Australian soccer is in need of support from people like you, then it’s in real trouble. The simple fact that TV in general (not just channel 9) is failing to attract an younger audience just shows you don’t even understand the dynamics involved or even the point you’re trying to make in the end.

            “Australia are conditioned to automatically defer to other sports. I think that’s an attitude Postecoglou is trying to change, and it’s an idea that inspired this piece.”

            No, it just really rubs you up the wrong way that in Australia there is a choice of codes, and that most prefer others over soccer.No BS about TV stations brainwashing/alienating people is going to change that.

            • Columnist

              September 13th 2016 @ 8:12am
              Mike Tuckerman said | September 13th 2016 @ 8:12am | ! Report

              On the contrary, I’d say the problem is yours – hence your comment – and given that I’m a member of an NRL club, I’m well aware of the ‘choice of codes’ on offer.

            • Roar Guru

              September 13th 2016 @ 1:00pm
              Bob Brown said | September 13th 2016 @ 1:00pm | ! Report

              Whatever you call yourself nowadays, you’ve totally missed the point.
              Its not a question of choosing the code you want, that’s a given, anyone can choose to follow any code.

              Its how different codes are treated differently by different media outlets depending on what their bias is and what they have invested their time and money in.

              I follow most sports but get a bit tired of being called a hooIigan and Iout just because I go to an A-League game and some fooI decides to light a flare.

              There is obvious bias in sports reporting in Australia and I wouldn’t be surprised if the NRL and AFL have splashed the cash to make sure it stays like that. If you don’t get it, then you are a part of the probIem.

              • September 13th 2016 @ 11:09pm
                pacman said | September 13th 2016 @ 11:09pm | ! Report

                Very perceptive post Bob.

          • Roar Pro

            September 13th 2016 @ 9:06am
            Kasey said | September 13th 2016 @ 9:06am | ! Report

            @Mike: “I’m more interested in the way a lot of football fans in Australia are conditioned to automatically defer to other sports.”

            Its kind of like being a battered wife(perhaps?). We crave the attention of the MSM as validation of our status as a ‘big’ sport and when they continually mistreat us we still end up going back to them.
            No wonder we are a bit messed up mentally:(
            If we speak out in protest at the mistreatment we’re called prescious and petty. No matter how well behaved we are we’re inferred to be borderline criminals by virtue of the sport we love. Its a simple self-confidence issue but blaming the games fans for its self confidence issues is only half the story. If you tell a person theyre crap for long enough even a strong person would start to believe it.

          • Roar Rookie

            September 13th 2016 @ 5:11pm
            Stevo said | September 13th 2016 @ 5:11pm | ! Report

            ” I’m more interested in the way a lot of football fans in Australia are conditioned to automatically defer to other sports.”

            The Stockholm Syndrome.

            Back to football, check this out for history https://ethnicvictoriansoccer.wordpress.com/2013/09/18/footscray-just-a-memory-from-the-past/

            Did play for that lot as a junior many, many years ago at Schintler Reserve. Old age 🙂

      • Roar Guru

        September 12th 2016 @ 10:37am
        Chris Kettlewell said | September 12th 2016 @ 10:37am | ! Report

        Ange is proving to be a really, really good national team coach after proving to be a pretty decent club coach. The thing is, there’s no guarantee of those correlating because I see them as having such drastic differences.

        As a club coach you have your team training week in, week out, including pre-season, giving you lots of time to mould the team into the system you want and you can search the world to find the right player to plug a gap that you are struggling to fill locally. If you have players who are good, but don’t fit your system, the option is there to trade them for another player who suits the style of play you are trying to achieve more.

        As a national team coach you get your players together for short spurts of time, have a couple of training sessions, play a match, and then lose them again, only having them for even a few weeks straight a couple of times every four years in the lead up to the major tournaments. Plus, you are limited to the pool of players available for your country. If you are struggling for a good left-back you can’t recruit one from South America or Europe. You have to make do with what you’ve got. Often national coaching will involve more moulding a system to suit the best players available, since you can’t trade players for others more suitable for your preferred system.

        So he’s shown he’s got a lot of skill, knowledge, flexibility and man management skills such that all the players respect him, want to play for him and trust his decisions. That’s a pretty good all around coach!

    • Roar Guru

      September 12th 2016 @ 8:17am
      Griffo said | September 12th 2016 @ 8:17am | ! Report

      You have to love what Ange is doing for the national team right now. To equally think big I believe (and hope) Ange is around for another World Cup cycle to really cement into the NT setup from the Socceroos down this mentally and abilities with and around the teams that he’s instilling right now.

      Ange is also ambitious and similar to say Marcelo Bielsa with Chile, an equally noticable World Cup run with the NT may see him jet off and manage a club abroad in a recognised league. I believe he is more than capable of this and it may be in ten years time seeing him take a team deep through a UCL campaign.

      Perhaps one day the likes of Valencia may choose an Ange Postecoglou over a Garry Neville. I believe Ange would still be in charge of Valencia if it was him over Neville…

      • September 12th 2016 @ 8:30am
        Fadida said | September 12th 2016 @ 8:30am | ! Report

        The way he sweated against the UAE certainly reminded me of a former Spanish manager, Jose Camacho 🙂

        Agree though

    • September 12th 2016 @ 8:28am
      uncle boo-boo said | September 12th 2016 @ 8:28am | ! Report

      Maybe if the headline said ‘astute’ or ‘shrewdest’ instead of ‘best’ it wouldn’t be as inflammatory (either would definitely be a more accurate description).

      • September 12th 2016 @ 11:01am
        Waz said | September 12th 2016 @ 11:01am | ! Report

        Why is it inflammatory, it’s someone’s opinion? Do you have a problem with free speech?

        Other tabs (NRL, AFL, Union) have similar statements and nobody thinks they need “challenging” lol

        • September 12th 2016 @ 4:59pm
          uncle boo-boo said | September 12th 2016 @ 4:59pm | ! Report

          “Why is it inflammatory, it’s someone’s opinion? Do you have a problem with free speech?

          Other tabs (NRL, AFL, Union) have similar statements and nobody thinks they need “challenging” lol”
          Eat my meal ;p

          • September 12th 2016 @ 5:53pm
            Waz said | September 12th 2016 @ 5:53pm | ! Report

            Not the most sensible reply from the self-appointed internet police but it explains where you’re coming from, sort of, lol

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