The Roar
The Roar

Geoff Parkes

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Joined October 2012

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Geoff is a Melbourne based sports fanatic and writer, who started contributing to The Roar in 2012, originally under the pen name Allanthus. His first book, A World in Conflict; the Global Battle For Rugby Supremacy was released in Dec 2017 to critical acclaim. For details on the book visit www.geoffparkes.com Meanwhile, his twin goals of achieving a single figure golf handicap and owning a fast racehorse remain tantalisingly out of reach.

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I’m not saying that Rennie is the answer SandBox, but I am saying why he’s a better answer than Jones, and that I understand why Johnson would want him in the role.

Jake White’s name has no doubt come up for consideration – but I have no idea how Johnson views him. Personally I wasn’t enamoured of the way his teams played rugby, but there’s no denying his success.

As for the AB’s, who knows what will happen. If I was them I’d be nabbing Joseph and Brown, but they seem to have plenty of options.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

After following Richmond for so long P/stayer, it was a well worn cycle around how the gloom of winter would be replaced by the emergence of cautious hope and optimism at season end, which then, when you heard of the new record times some of the players were doing around the Tan, morphed into rabid excitement by January, then… the new season started again and we were back to normal!

But of course, the miracle eventually did happen, and now we have two flags in three years! If the Tiges can do it, then surely the Wallabies can! 😂

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

Definitely no fires in Melbourne, TLN!
Although we have had the heater on a few times in the last week…

Best wishes to everyone who is in the potential firing line.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

Well they just had a fair crack at the Women’s World Cup Andy, (and lost out to NZ). So why wouldn’t they have a go at the mens, which is a far more enticing commercial prospect?

Happy for you to back up your comment, but I’d be astonished if, in today’s circumstances, hosting the Cup in 2027 wouldn’t be a net gain for Australian rugby.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

No argument at all with your second pgh, Micko, but I’m not sure how that ties to your argument.

And I agree with you about the Socceroos, but that means what we’re really talking about, is what form of the game holds primacy for Australian players and fans? In Soccer you’d have to say it’s the World Cup, then followed by overseas club football, then maybe the Asian Cup, then the domestic A-league. Because the World Cup is only every four years, and there is almost no meaningful international competition in between times, club football takes precedence over international football. Name the last time the Socceroos coach picked a true, full strength side for any international match that wasn’t a World Cup match or qualifier? So in that sense yes the Socceroos do struggle to field their best team, but it also doesn’t matter so much because outside of the WC and Asian C they’re not really playing in anything meaningful.

Meanwhile, for better or worse, in rugby, the dominant form of the game is still the international game, (as much as the English and French clubs want that to change), with meaningful test competition twice a year, every year, on top of the World Cup . Therefore it is only natural (and correct in my view) for Rugby Australia to want to retain what power they have, and keep control of their players to the extent that they can, so that they can determine their own destiny in the international arena.

The other key point is that soccer’s bed is already made, those international club competitions are long existing and the pathway for elite players is well established. What you’re asking Rugby Australia to do is jump from a position where they do hold some influence, to a new position of ‘giving in’ to the French and English clubs, and taking the crumbs (there is no way they will get access to all of the players they want for all of the internationals, ask Fiji how it works). And in the process, kiss away the bulk of their revenue.

It’s entirely reasonable for RA not to do that.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

The point I tried to get across numpty is that you don’t arrive at an ‘Australian way’ just because you say you want to.

The way NZ and South Africa (and Fiji and Japan) is derived from many years of adopting a certain philosophy, and teaching that right through all levels of the game.

I agree that it can be changed or developed – It was only in the 70’s that NZ moved away from a rugged, forwards-oriented game, and in the 80’s when they started to get the hang of it, and in the 90’s when it became cemented.

But for that to happen in Australia it would require a far higher degree of goodwill, mutual understanding and co-operation at all levels of the game, than what appears at this time to be possible.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

That will be a turn-up, Scott – when the report is released, finding out that the reason the Wallabies lost the World Cup was Dean Mumm….

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

The point I tried to make in the piece Adsa is that it isn’t a situation of, ‘ok now Cheika’s gone let’s conduct a search for a replacement.’

Johnson came into his job months ago, knowing that Cheika would be leaving after the World Cup. He’s had those months to figure out who he wants for the role, and now, with the timing confirmed, cast around to see if anyone new or unforeseen is an option, before making an appointment.

I don’t see anything wrong with that at all, he or RA doesn’t need to start with a blank canvas. It’s just that the ‘thought to other potential candidates’ that you’re referring to has already gone into it before now.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

Thanks as always for tuning in, TLN!

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

Strong point about the way the Wallabies started, Carlin. Fiji could have been very costly, and Wales was very costly.

It doesn’t always work out, something happens from a kick-off and you cede the early territory, (eg Mo’unga missing an early tackle against England, which swung England into attack from where they scored), but it happened too many times for the Wallabies to be coincidental.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

But didn’t follow reference to “with friends like that”

Was just being a smart alec, Dave, twisting an old quotation around.
I agree, those comments from Sweeny are helpful and favourable for Australia.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

It’s true that they did lose to the AB’s P2R2, but I and others also stressed before the WC that the loser of that first match would not really be in a negative position.

Both teams were always going to qualify for the quarter-finals regardless. It’s what happened from that point that was always going to count.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

He’s just one of a few suitable candidates, Micko.

It’s fair to say that Foster, Joseph, Rennie, Robertson and Cotter all present as pretty strong options right now, without considering Gatland and Schmidt who are currently unavailable but might be by the time of the next World Cup.

There are others with ambitions to throw their hats into the ring as well.

So to your point, there’s no need for anyone to be desperate to bring him or any one of those guys in. They’ll just go through an orderly process and try to pick the best man for the job as it stands.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

Thanks Sheek. I think that whatever happens this time around we will see more productivity, support and co-operation from a wider group of coaches.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

“Soccer figured this out and that’s a genuine global game with professional leagues in most countries around the world.”

I always look at these types of comments Micko and wonder what is it that I’m missing? Soccer may have “figured this out”, but Rugby Australia is a partner in what is widely regarded as the best standard rugby competition in the world, why would they shift away from that, let all their best players go and play elsewhere in the world, and be left with something that resembles the A League, or even worse?

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

Fair comment, Wal. When your whole defensive system is built around shifting multiple players around to cover weaknesses, it’s a pretty poor foundation to be working from.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

I think you’re right to say that there will always be pressure from league poaching, and there’ll always be players who are enticed away no matter what, (and there’ll be posters who can provide individual examples), but my understanding DR is that rugby is starting to do a bit better in this area of retention.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

You might have just hit upon one of the problems there, Chook.

It is important to “learn lessons”. But Aus rugby seems preoccupied with “taking some learnings”.

These may well be not one and the same thing! 😂

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

Hi robbo

Imo Rennie is a decent straight-up guy, very astute, and I’m sure he’ll handle himself well.

And I agree with your very good point about rugby in Australia not needing a continuation of the ‘circus’ or ‘drama’ environment. He’s definitely not one to provide ammo for that.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

No doubt all of those things would be handy hammer – especially the $100mil!

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

“To me Rennie is a good Super/Club level coach, nothing more. I still like a MCkellar option.”

I guess what I’d ask Bobby, is how do we know? They might both make great Test coaches, or one of them might, or they both might be short of the mark.

At some point, people who make these decisions – in this case Johnson – do so from a more informed position than the rest of us, and while there will still be an element of doubt even for him, we have to trust that he’ll get it right.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

Thanks Tree. Spot on, Des is right to recognise that McQueen’s sides had a very solid defensive base, and it was certainly a huge factor in the ’99 WC win.

But it’s not an either/or situation, and I’d certainly argue that the most visible, defining characteristic of his sides – without diminishing anything they did on defence – was how they operated with the ball.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

We’ll give you an early mark if they still have such a thing.

Pertinent comment, Sherry. I think we’re all due a decent rest, sooner than later.
We’ll see how things go over the next couple of weeks, but I suspect we’re in for an early Xmas break this year!

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

😂

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup

Hi mz

I think part of the ‘thundering herd’ was down to some of the news outlets needing a story with local interest to keep things alive in the final week of the Cup, where the Wallabies weren’t involved. But yes, it seems to have taken on a life of its own.

The Wrap: Five lessons Australia must learn from the World Cup