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The Roar

Geoff Parkes

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Joined October 2012

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Geoff is a Melbourne based sports fanatic and writer, who started contributing to The Roar in 2012, originally under the pen name Allanthus. His first book, A World in Conflict; the Global Battle For Rugby Supremacy was released in Dec 2017 to critical acclaim. For details on the book visit www.geoffparkes.com Meanwhile, his twin goals of achieving a single figure golf handicap and owning a fast racehorse remain tantalisingly out of reach.

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Be careful what you wish for, Steve…

The quick questions: Cracks in the partnership?

I can only imagine how bad it is, Carlos. The professional rugby base was flimsy enough as it was, and now it has been turned on its head.

I feel very sorry for the players who haven’t picked up club contracts straight away, and the emerging players who would have expected to come into the Jaguares. What are their options? They are rugby’s new Fijians. Can we now expect French clubs to move in and set up ‘academies’ in BA?

And, what’s even sadder, I expect there’ll be people, amateur diehards, in Argentina who are happy with this outcome.

The quick questions: Cracks in the partnership?

Once we got past the ones who thought it was all a rugby conspiracy, I think we ended up with a fairly decent thread, Nick.

What was really interesting was to see the NRL head of football come out yesterday on a mission to stamp out the ‘hip drop’ tackle, because it’s dangerous and players can easily break an ankle as a result.

But as for hitting each other in the head with impunity? No worries, as you were gentlemen…

Why the Wallabies still need 'Three Storey Rory'

They’ll need to get realigned first Perthstayer, but yes, that’s how it needs to be.

Super Rugby as we know it all but over after South Africa votes to quit, send teams to Europe instead

Or the alternative, foot closest to the sideline forward, feet together or foot farthest from the sideline forward…

And to throw the opposition off the scent, someone would yell out “change the call”, so you’d yell out a new set of numbers, and throw it to exactly the same place!

Such stealth and high-level deception…. straight out of Get Smart! 😂

Why the Wallabies still need 'Three Storey Rory'

If they do Don, don’t bet your house on Kearnsie staying up late to do the commentary!

Green versus gold: Mining talent in South Africa

Nice read thanks, Nick. Horrible timing for Arnold and the Wallabies.

This piece highlights two ways in which the game has bounded ahead in the professional era. At the risk of sounding old, ‘back in my day’ you would never have seen a lock shift the ball on at first receiver, as skilfully as Arnold does here. He would have been booted from pillar to post for getting in the way or even thinking about it.

And you never saw forwards call the line-outs. They were considered ‘too dumb’, or else ‘too tired’ from having exerted all that energy in the tight exchanges. Only the halfback was considered to have enough smarts to handle such a task.

Do you know if there was a particular coach or situation that brought about that change? It all seems rather quaint and ridiculous now…

Why the Wallabies still need 'Three Storey Rory'

For me personally, Jez, I’m more like Rugby Tragic, I enjoy the South African sides and being familiar with the players.

But I understand the view that seems to be the most popular position for Australians. Given the circumstances around COVID, plus Super Rugby fatigue, that’s fair enough and – as you say – an opportunity to move on to something better.

The rider being that there is a sustainable financial model, and the people dancing on Super Rugby’s grave aren’t the first to complain if it turns out there’s not enough money to pay players.

Super Rugby as we know it all but over after South Africa votes to quit, send teams to Europe instead

All of the nations will do what is best for themselves, Jacko. If that happens to be together, great, if that’s apart, well so be it. Or it might be a combination of the two if that’s the most expedient.

Staying aligned for Test matches but separating for franchise rugby isn’t, of itself, as controversial as you might believe it to be. Especially when you take the emotion out of it.

Super Rugby as we know it all but over after South Africa votes to quit, send teams to Europe instead

A couple of very handy teams there, Harry. Nice blend of experience and new talent.
I’m leaning towards Davids over Mr. Stick.

Agree with your comments about the Razorfish, Schickerling. He’s a decent player, with a bit of size about him.

Green versus gold: Mining talent in South Africa

Yeah, that’s really the story here, isn’t it Brett?

Given where COVID is right now, does anyone really believe there could be any different outcome for next year? In itself, that’s a non-story.

But does anyone really believe that for 2022 onwards, SANZAAR was really going to settle back into the same old Super Rugby competition, as if nothing had happened?

Super Rugby as we know it all but over after South Africa votes to quit, send teams to Europe instead

Yes, understand there’s a difference. Which as you say, goes back to the culture of the game.

How the NRL is failing the concussion test

Thanks soapit. I write a weekly article on rugby and watch countless matches in full. I also watch 2-3 AFL matches, 2-3 NRL matches and the Wellington Phoenix every week. Plus as much golf and cycling as I can squeeze in. Throw in other writing projects, running a business and contributing to a household.

I do read most Roar articles on all those sports, and scan the comments, but simply don’t have time to get involved in the debates and commentary. I don’t have time to even think about conspiracies and agendas. It’s as simple as that.

TSP is someone who has admitted that on a quiet night shift at his hospital in the UK, he comes on here to stir things up for a bit of sport. He’s not genuine and not worth anyone’s time.

How the NRL is failing the concussion test

Perhaps mate, but yesterday we had comments from Greg Alexander and Graham Annesley about how dangerous the ‘hip drop’ tackle is and how the NRL will need to act quickly to stamp it out, because it’s dangerous and players are potentially breaking their ankles.

So they can act quickly and decisively when they see the need to.

How the NRL is failing the concussion test

Kolbe would be fantastic too. Bordering on too small, but that kind of electric talent is too good to ignore.

How the NRL is failing the concussion test

There’s a great article lurking in there, Harry.

A South African league XIII to take on the Kangaroos. You could easily come up with a brilliant side. And because Faf wouldn’t be allowed to box kick any more, he’d be even more brilliant!

How the NRL is failing the concussion test

That’s an interesting point, Tom. It’s like high hits have become so normalised they’re hardly a talking point any more.

How the NRL is failing the concussion test

Hi Barry

I think you’ve got it dead right – which really aligns with Martin Lang’s viewpoint. It’s a contact sport, everyone goes into it accepting some level of injury risk, but when those injuries come as a result of foul play outside of the rules, and sfa is done to prevent that type of thing reoccurring, then there’s something fundamentally not right about that.

How the NRL is failing the concussion test

‘Mickey Mouse?’

As in… ‘I’m running for parliament… no hang on a minute, I’ve changed my mind’?

How the NRL is failing the concussion test

Agree soapit that the judiciary process should always allow for specific circumstances, nuances and mitigating factors.

Not every instance is the same, and the level of intent varies too, ie a reflex action as opposed to premeditated head hunting.

How the NRL is failing the concussion test

Hi Ross

Brett makes the very pertinent point below that the fact the the NRL bit the bullet and banned the shoulder charge, shows that they do have the cojones to push through necessary but potentially unpopular change, in the interest of player safety.

Why they wouldn’t do the same with high shots is mystifying.

How the NRL is failing the concussion test

“To my mind the answer is no, the sport can’t ever be made truly safe, but what can happen, and must happen, is to make the game as safe as possible, still maintaining the competitive edge and character it has.”

There’s a balance to be found, isn’t there mz? What is acceptable for players, parents, fans, doctors, lawyers and every stakeholder in the sport?

But there needs to be a will to determine what that point is, before any meaningful action can be taken to strike that balance.

How the NRL is failing the concussion test

Cheers Brett. That’s what’s so surprising about all of this – the NRL has shown that they can take the lead on controversial player safety matters, yet despite this one seemingly being an obvious one to fix, we’re still stuck in the dark ages.

How the NRL is failing the concussion test

There is frustration around some of that, Pickett, that’s true.

But I’m sure that most people who watch a lot of rugby would say that, 1) referees and players have adjusted pretty well, everyone understands the laws, and by and large, refs do a pretty good job in getting most of the calls right, and 2) most people in the game accept that it’s preferable to get things wrong on the low side rather than the high side.

The Su’A hit on Lewis is a great example. It isn’t 100% clear where contact was made, thus some people think it’s not fair to put Su’A in the bin. Why shouldn’t he be afforded the benefit of the doubt?

For one, Lewis was obviously concussed, but more importantly, Su’A could have changed his technique, bent at the knees and driven up into the waist/ribcage, wrapping his arms, just as hard, and taken all doubt out of it.

How the NRL is failing the concussion test

Well said, Pomoz. I do understand that some people are fearful that their game, or the game as they know it, will be taken off them. They believe they’re protecting the game, but in truth, by denying the undeniable, they’re actually doing the opposite.

How the NRL is failing the concussion test