The Roar
The Roar

Kersi Meher-Homji

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Joined April 2009

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Kersi is an author of 14 cricket books including The Waugh Twins, Crcket's Great All-rounders, Six Appeal and Nervous Nineties. He writes regularly for Inside Cricket and other publications. He is busy with his new book on From Bradman to Kohli -- Best of Australia - India Test cricket with Forewords by Allan Border and Sunil Gavaskar .

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Yes, Zim Zam, the critics are very fickle. Happy retirement to Clarke, Haddin, Watson and Rogers. They contributed an enormous lot to Australian cricket, especially Clarke and Watson.

Haddin will be missed behind - and in front of - the stumps

True, SL have lost their big names. So have India: Tendulkar, Dravid, V V S, Sehwag, Kumble, Gambhi, Also Dhoni in Tests.

Swinging series in Sri Lanka ignored in Australia

Thank you all for your interesting comments.
I must thank CricInfo for keeping me informed. But for them I would have missed the recent fascinating India in Sri Lanka series.

Swinging series in Sri Lanka ignored in Australia

Thank you Ronan and Johnno.
True Sanga, Jayawardene, Murali and Dilshan have retired but in Mathews, Chandimal and Herath they have excellent replacements.
This SL-Ind was one of the best Test series yet I could not watch it on TV. But for CricInfo I would have missed it.
Why was SL-Pak series televised and not SL-Ind? That is my question.

Swinging series in Sri Lanka ignored in Australia

Thank you, Sheek and B2.

Arthur Morris was a master batsman with sense of humour

Australia was lucky in finding top class opening batsmen and Arthur Morris was among them. Look at the list:
Trumper and Duff; Ponsford, Kippax and Woodfull; Morris, Barnes and Brown; Simpson and Lawry; Hayden and Langer …
Where would Warner and Rogers fit in among them?

Arthur Morris was a master batsman with sense of humour

You are correct, AUSI.
People have such short memories.

Equal the Don? Clarke's chance for a record-breaking last Test

Luke,
To bring his Test batting average to 50, Clarke will have to score either 122 (without getting out) or 172 in one innings or 222 in two innings at The Oval.

Equal the Don? Clarke's chance for a record-breaking last Test

Thank you, Targa.

Simultaneous sayonaras to Pup and Sanga

Thank you, Viren.
Any more such additions, Roarers?

Yes, both Dravid and VVS played their last Test at Adelaide in January 2012.

Simultaneous sayonaras to Pup and Sanga

Clarke’s positives as a captain and batsman far outweigh his minuses. Australians should be proud of his achievements.

A sad swan song for Clarkey

India was ahead in the Brisbane Test when Johnson joined skipper Smith. The sledging to Johnson brought the best out of him as batsman and bowler. Aggro is good but too much aggro led to India’s defeat.
Well done, Australia. They deserved to win.

India are copying Australia, and it's costing them victory

Correction: At the end of the story, there is a typo. It should be 300 runs and not 30 runs.

If India sets Australia a win target of 300 runs on the fifth and final day, it could be the repeat of the Adelaide Test which concluded last Saturday with the result in doubt till the last hour.

Better batting in Brisbane than BBL

Hi Rustom, Kharshed is my uncle, alas no more.
I never saw him bat or keep wickets because of our age difference but he was a brilliant story teller despite his stammer.
He would have been brilliant in today’s T20 matches. Once in a Parsees v. Europeans match at the Bombay Gymkhana in 1936, he hit the dreaded Harold Larwood for four fours in the opening over.

Do you live in India?

Eleven Test records that may never be broken

Mark and Shortfineleg,
These days umpires take their decision on bad light and don’t offer it to the players.

Clarke courageous, but Australia should have declared earlier

Thank you Keshava and all Roarers.
A tragic day for the cricket fraternity.

Near death experiences of G. Watson, Sutcliffe and Patil recalled

Bayman, thank you for sharing the Chatfield story. Hope you did not ask him unknowingly, “Did you ever bowl in your life?” Just as Tony Greig had asked an oldish man (who turned out to be Don Bradman) in1971, “Did you play any cricket in your younger days?”

I am sure Bradman, Greig, our friend Vinay Verma and Phil Hughes must be discussing cricket in heaven. Bless their souls.

Bayman, Can you recall any other on-field cricket fatality apart from Bedkober’s?

Near death experiences of G. Watson, Sutcliffe and Patil recalled

What a tragedy! May Phil Hughes’ soul rest in peace!

I remember chatting with him two years ago at the SCG nets. I told him that his dashing stroke-play reminded me of Sehwag. And he modestly replied, “But Sehwag is a great batsman.”

A likeable personality, Phil Hughes!

Near death experiences of G. Watson, Sutcliffe and Patil recalled

Pete,
All the players who came back to play had no problems subsequently. Patil scored brilliant 174 in the next Test a few days later.
Nari Contractor is aged 80 now, 52 years after his near death experience in 1962. I met him last year and he appeared fit.

Near death experiences of G. Watson, Sutcliffe and Patil recalled

The Bush.
No, I have not heard about it. I hope Phil survives and the Test goes on.
Yes, to cancel a Test match would be an over reaction.
Let’s hope for the best.

Near death experiences of G. Watson, Sutcliffe and Patil recalled

The Bush,

Near death experiences of G. Watson, Sutcliffe and Patil recalled

Thank you, Roarers, for your valuable additions.
I think there is a book in this idea.

Near death experiences of G. Watson, Sutcliffe and Patil recalled

Tim, You gave me a scare re Ewen Chatfield. And it was refreshing to read from Atawhai Drive that Chatfield is with us.
Anyway, I checked CricInfo and I quote from it:

“A hard-working, accurate fast-medium bowler who, like his contemporary Richard Hadlee, seemed to get better with age Ewen Chatfield had an unforgettable Test debut against England at Auckland in 1974-75, but for all the wrong reasons. After a stubborn defensive innings at No. 11, he was struck on the temple by Peter Lever. His heart stopped and he swallowed his tongue and only mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and heart massage by Bernard Thomas, England’s physiotherapist, saved his life. He was rushed to hospital and, thankfully, regained consciousness an hour later. He was recalled in 1976-77, when he bowled steadily and industriously. Overshadowed by Hadlee, he nevertheless formed an effective an opening partnership with him for a decade. When Hadlee was injured in 1987-88 against England, Chatfield took 13 wickets at only 15 runs apiece. He was awarded an MBE for his services to cricket.”

Another near death experience on the cricket pitch.

Can Roarers cite more such experiences with a happy ending?

Near death experiences of G. Watson, Sutcliffe and Patil recalled

The title of this story “History shows Australia fare well with a substitute captain” suggests that I have done a thorough research on all Tests since 1877 for substitute captains. It is NOT so. I was referring only to Australia-India cricket in recent times. My title for the story was: “A substitute captain works well for Australia”, citing the 2004 Nagpur Test.

The caption under the Michael Clarke pic says that he did well under substitute captain [Adam Gilchrist] with bat and ball. Yes, he scored his debut Test century under Gilly as captain. But his 6 for 9 in the Mumbai Test was under Ricky Ponting as skipper.

History shows Australia fare well with a substitute captain

Welcome to the commentary team, Meg Lanning and Lisa Sthalekar. I enjoy their comments.
Did you know, Glenn Mitchell, that the first female cricket commentator was Ms Nayudu in India in early 1990s? She was the grand-daughter of India’s first Test captain and terrific hitter CK Nayudu.

Female cricket commentators making their mark, at last