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Cameron Boyle

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Joined June 2019

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I would still argue Peter Nevill as the best gloveman, but Inglis is not far behind. What’s impressive is that he is only 25. Keeping is an art that is often not fully developed until well into a player’s late-20s. Over time he will improve with his footwork and body positioning in order to make his glovework even more reliable.

Four takeaways from Round 1 of the Sheffield Shield

It’s easy to forget that he has still only just turned 27. It feels like Agar’s been around forever but that’s what happens when you debut as a teenager. His best years are probably still to come.

Four takeaways from Round 1 of the Sheffield Shield

That’s a really fair comment Bernie. I don’t disagree that Agar is not quite good enough as a batter or bowler for selection. I think his batting is the arm that can improve enough to get him selected.

Four takeaways from Round 1 of the Sheffield Shield

Hi Ruairidh. Right now I don’t think Inglis is good enough. One innings does not a test cricketer make. However, I think he has the ability to be good enough. His BBL performances last year were really encouraging and he has the range of shots to succeed.

Great comments by Paul and Tom below. He needs to show at least a full season before he should be considered for selection in the long-form game and he does need to balance his batting mindset too.

Four takeaways from Round 1 of the Sheffield Shield

The comment about Swepson was more in reference to his past performances where he hasn’t always shown the necessary level of control. I don’t think that’s a bad thing either, leg-spin is a tough art and I think it’s good he’s been given the opportunity to learn his game and develop stronger control.

I agree he was excellent in the second innings and showed great skill. What I want to see is that it is repeated. If he continues in the form that he showed against Tasmania and in the last season then I reckon he could be good enough for the test team.

Four takeaways from Round 1 of the Sheffield Shield

Hi Paul. Yeah, I do think he’s got a better chance as a batting all-rounder. His batting has improved in leaps and bounds in the last couple of years and I think he has potential to bat at 6 or 7 in a test match team.
I think his emphasis on bowling in the white-ball game has left his bowling without a great deal of threat in the longer game. He bowls for control rather than for wickets and I don’t think that’s an approach that suits a top-line bowler. If we had a stronger keeper-batsmen, then I think Agar’s could bat 7 and bowl 10 overs in support. Paine isn’t a good enough batter to justify that approach though so Agar’s best hope is to keep improving his batting.

Four takeaways from Round 1 of the Sheffield Shield

Australia has definitely been better served by leggies through its history, but globally off-spinners have had more success. Of the ten highest wicket-taking spin bowlers in test cricket only two of them are leggies (Warne and Kumble).

A good spin bowler is a good spin bowler regardless of which way the ball turns. I think Australian conditions with the extra pace and bounce probably suits leg spin a little more, but Lyon has showed that a quality offie can still succeed in our conditions.

Four takeaways from Round 1 of the Sheffield Shield

Yep. Freo’s drafting/development in recent years is a perfect example of how to turn around an aging team quickly. They’ve done well.

Which 2020 finalists will not be back in 2021?

I agree Ugle-Hagan looks amazing, but it’s unlikely that a 196cm youngster will be able to contribute immediately. Naughton will really need to take a step up if the Dogs are to be serious contenders next year. I think they’ve got the midfield and defence to be a competitive team regardless, but they need some reliable avenues to goals.

Which 2020 finalists will not be back in 2021?

I think we’re all a bit bored Rowdy. It’s why I write 2,500 word articles instead of doing my job.

Which 2020 finalists will not be back in 2021?

Jarrod Cameron does have elite skills and finishing ability and showed some flashes last year. This year he struggled to get into the team and didn’t do much when selected.
Like a lot of young small forwards he can struggle to impact the game. His pressure and intensity levels are also inconsistent. Could be a good pickup, but depends on price.

Which 2020 finalists will not be back in 2021?

I believe it was worth it. Elite midfielders don’t grow on trees, and whilst Kelly hasn’t been at his absolute best this year, some of his performances late in the season showed how good he can be.
The Eagles were betting they’d be good for the next couple of years so the draft picks wouldn’t be higher than the 20s. If the picks stay in that range, then it would be worth it. If the bottom falls out and the pick is in the top-10, then I may make a different argument.

Which 2020 finalists will not be back in 2021?

Great points Brendon. You’re dead right about Port’s young talent. Along with Brisbane, they may have the best set of under 23/24 players around. However, the nature of young talent is that it is uncertain. A lot of them have shown promise, but have yet to translate that into the sort of consistent long-term performance that wins sides premierships. That’s why I’m so uncertain about Port.
If they maintain the current trajectory, they are premiership contenders, but as I mentioned in the article there are plenty of examples of young teams who showed a spike in performance before falling back to earth a little. Even Hawthorn from 2008 to 2009 are a good case study.

Which 2020 finalists will not be back in 2021?

Great comment footyguy. One of the toughest choices any list manager has to make is weighing up the virtues of continuity against optimising your assets. I personally favour an emphasis on contiunuity, as a team that develops/plays together over a period of time devlops an understanding and comfort that cannot be manufactured.
However, if you are going to trend towards asset maximisation, then Port are a great example of doing it well.
The interest thing for the next few years is watching Port transition from being sellers to holders. I think they’d like their list now and will be doing as much as they can to hold onto it.

Which 2020 finalists will not be back in 2021?

The article was already a bit of a book already, so I decided not to add that stuff in. I’d thought about doing a second article on the teams that are ready to jump up to finals action, but there’s more than enough stuff out there on those teams who missed the eight.
Although since you asked, I’d tip GWS and Carlton to come into the eight.

Which 2020 finalists will not be back in 2021?

Thanks for the kind words Peter and great response too.

That’s a fantastic point about freeing up some midfielders to play an outside role. I think Sidebottom is well suited to that role in some respects as he has great vision and a penetrating kick. My only knock on him as an outside mid is that he doesn’t have the linebreaking speed that you commonly see now with wingmen. As he gets older, I think Sidebottom’s best role is as a half-forward/midfielder who links the contested ball into the forward 50.

I’m also interested that you’d be comfortable with Ben Brown at that price. I don’t necessarily think he would be well suited to Collingwood’s current game plan. Brown needs clean entries as he isn’t a fantastic contested mark, and the Pies aren’t exactly doing well with nice neat delivery to their forwards.

Which 2020 finalists will not be back in 2021?

With regards to Jones’ strike rate, yes he had a lower rate than some of the greats that played above, but I think you have to compare apples with apples. When you look at the strike rates of other Australian batters who played during Jones’ career than his strike rate is more than handy. When compared to other Australian top-order players, the only one with a better strike rate during Jones’s career was Mark Waugh (80). Jones’ rate was better than contemporaries like AB (72), Steve Waugh (72), Tom Moody (65), Graham Wood (65), David Boon (65), Mark Taylor (56) and Geoff Marsh (56). Australia was a tough place to play back then with its bowling-friendly pitches and large grounds, I think Jones’ record holds up better than you suggest.

Dean Jones' greatest one-day knock was not for Australia, but against

That’s a great point Brainstrust. His running also forced his partners out of their comfort zone as well and I think helped make Australia a betting team in the way that they worked for each other. Leading into the 1987 World Cup, I don’t think Australia was the most talented side there, but they won because they helped squeeze out advantages at the margins of the game – such as fielding, and running between the wickets. Jones played a huge role in setting the standards that helped lead Australia to the cup.

Dean Jones' greatest one-day knock was not for Australia, but against

Great call on Sir Viv. He had the mindset of a modern limited overs player in his desire to dominate attacks early and remain aggressive throughout an innings. The only slight difference between them is that Richards was a little more technically correct in the way he played (although the way he threw his hands through the ball was different), while Jones had a little bit more inventiveness.

Dean Jones' greatest one-day knock was not for Australia, but against

You’re not wrong about his 145 against England, that was an absolute masterpiece.

Dean Jones' greatest one-day knock was not for Australia, but against

I love test cricket and I’m a bit of a traditionalist as well, but it’s impossible to ignore the importance of T20 to the growth of the game. Its relative accessibility, compared to test cricket, allows a greater number of nations to compete. The viewer-friendly nature of T20 has also been a financial boon for the game, especially in the subcontinent.

Are Australia on track for the 2021 T20 World Cup?

You’ve made some good points there Paul. One thing I’d thought about, but didn’t mention in the article, was moving Finch down to 4 or 5 in the order. He’s batted there in the past and done well, and that would enable someone like Stoinis, Wade or Short to be selected in the other opening role with Warner.

It would be a tough call though because Finch and Warner have a clear comfort together and it may just be robbing Peter to pay Paul.

Are Australia on track for the 2021 T20 World Cup?

Thanks for the pickup Aus. Yeah, that one slipped through to the keeper. In my first draft of the team, I had Nathan Wilson in that position. After a fair bit of wavering, I ended up selecting Jetta but forgot to change the team he belonged to.

Who would play State of Origin in 2019? Part 3: Western Australia

Thanks for the comments Big Al. I did think about Naughton however there isn’t much difference in his and Kennedy’s performance right now and in a theoretical SOO game, I reckon the selectors would go for the bigger name. Even as Kennedy and Franklin decline, WA due have some good young key forwards coming through with Naughton and Oscar Allen.

Who would play State of Origin in 2019? Part 3: Western Australia

Naitanui was selected partly because there are few other high-level alternatives. Outside of him, you’re looking at Paddy Ryder or Tim English and I think Naitanui’s best is still better than those players.

I agree that Vic’s midfield is excellent, but I think you’re underselling WA’s mids. Fyfe, Cripps, Yeo, Kelly, Hill and Coniglio are more than a match for the names you mentioned.

Who would play State of Origin in 2019? Part 3: Western Australia