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Why should we understand - and encourage - Charles Leclerc

DN9 new author
Roar Rookie
23rd September, 2019
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Charles Leclerc. (Photo by Marco Canoniero/LightRocket via Getty Images)
DN9 new author
Roar Rookie
23rd September, 2019
2

It is fair to say that Charles Leclerc’s Singapore weekend was made of mixed fortunes.

In 24 hours, he transited from the happiest man on the grid after achieving third consecutive pole position to a Ferrari driver having missed the win due to the team strategy.

Watching the race live and listening to Charles’ radio messages, I must admit that I had the same reaction while analysing the situation.

The feeling of unfairness amplified with the fact that, his teammate, Sebastian Vettel qualified only third on the grid and Charles did everything that had to be done on the first stint of the race to ensure the race win.

However, we should bear in mind that Charles is in his maiden season at the Scuderia and only his second season competing in the Formula One World Drivers’ Championship.

I personally rate him highly as he has been able to deliver on numerous occasions and most importantly, values the seat given to him. In this increasingly materialistic world, when great things happen early and relatively easily in our lives, we tend to underrate them.

In addition, along with Max Verstappen, Charles looks to become a future Formula One legend. At this point in time, he has all the qualities and is lucky to be at the right place at the right time, an opportunity that not every talented driver in the motorsport world is able to grasp due to various circumstances.

From Ferrari’s point of view, they will ensure that Charles is put in the best of conditions for future World Championship title fights.

He has been through the famous Ferrari Driving Academy, started Formula One in Sauber Formula One team (which is supplied engines by Ferrari) and also holds at heart Jules Bianchi, a dearest friend of his who passed away in tragic circumstances in the Japanese Grand Prix of 2015.

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I genuinely feel that Charles has become more emotionally intelligent after the Singapore Grand Prix and this will benefit him in minimising possible race mistakes, eventually facilitating his rise as a leading driver.