The Roar
The Roar

David Lord

Expert

Joined February 2011

4.49m

Views

2.4k

Published

2.4k

Comments

David Lord spends his waking hours keeping abreast of what’s happening in the world of sport around the world and is one of the pre-eminent voices on sport in Australia. David has been deeply involved in two of the biggest sporting stories - with World Series Cricket in 1977 and professional rugby in 1983. In those early days of WSC, David was managing Jeff Thomson and Vivian Richards. Withdrawing “Thommo” from the original WSC ended up in the High Court of England, described by David as “not a top tourist resort”. In 1983 he signed 208 of the best rugby players from Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and France to play an international pro circuit. The concept didn’t get off the ground, but it did force the IRB to get cracking and bring in the World Rugby Cup, now one of the world’s great sporting spectacles every four years.

Published

Comments

TWAS, when it comes to knowing and what makes Scott Johnson and Michael O’Connor tick I’ll back myself to know a lot more about both of them than any of you knockers.

Michael O'Connor is a brilliant choice as the third Wallabies selector

Thugbyfan, you obviously don’t know Scott Johnson, or Michael O’Connor.

They won’t be there to simply rubber stamp what Michael Cheika wants, both Johnson and O’Connor are just as strong-willed as Cheika, which will make for some rigorous debate around the selection table.

The days of Cheika calling all the shots are gone, which will be just as beneficial to the Wallabies as a squad as it will be for Cheika himself.

You can bet Cheika will find debating with Johnson and O’Connor on selections and tactics will be more enlightening than his past debates with Stephen Larkham.

Michael O'Connor is a brilliant choice as the third Wallabies selector

Nor is Michael Hooper the best player in any position.

Michael O'Connor is a brilliant choice as the third Wallabies selector

Pity you didn’t read the entire column TWAS, Michael O’Connor’s “career”, as you put it, didn’t end near 30 years ago, it was five as the successful Australian Sevens coach.
As a result he’s well up to date with the current crop, having stayed in touch.

Michael O'Connor is a brilliant choice as the third Wallabies selector

Not surprisingly, the bag Beale contingent is already in action, even though he has yet to play a competition game in 2019.
It doesn’t matter if Beale makes three busts to set up two tries and score one himself to win a game, if he misses one tackle that’s the target.
Beale’s far more of an asset at 12 than 15, the closer he is to the action the better.
I concede Folau has a problem passing left to right, but what have Waratahs coach Daryl Gibson, and Wallaby coach Michael Cheika, done about it?
Answer nothing, but both coaches have had ample time to raise his passing bar.

There's a lot to like about the Waratahs, but the bad elements are still bad

Justin, I first flagged Pat Cummins as a future Test captain some months ago, but nobody “knows” he will be a good captain, it’s a gut feeling judged on what happens in the middle.
The team gravitates to him more than any other team member, and there are three very good reasons why.
Cummins gives his all every minute of the day with the ball, even when he’s obviously knackered he keeps making batsmen play as he rarely bowls a loose ball, he treasures his wicket even more than the recognised batsmen, and he’s ever alert in the field instanced by the spectacular run out in Adelaide, and the diving forward caught and bowl at Manuka.
He’s simply a full-on cricketer who when interviewed proves he has cricket nous, and there’s never a hint of ego as he’s very humble and modest by nature, call it what you will.
Justin, those are the cold hard facts, ending any speculation as to whether Pat Cummins will make a good captain.
And let’s not forget he’s more than halfway there already as a recently appointed vice-captain.

Pat Cummins: First the Allan Border Medal, next the captaincy

Paul, he’s already vice-captain, just a heartbeat away from the top job.
Steve Smith can’t be captain for another 13 months, so Tim Paine will retain his captaincy until at least then.
By the late 2020s into 2021, Pat Cummins will be far more at ease with what’s required to lead the side, and as he proved last night in accepting his Allan Border Medal he has more more personality, and off-the-cuff ability, than Travis Head will ever have, and Cummins has a sharp cricketing brain.
He will make an excellent captain, and in the process bring more fans to the game because he has charisma.

Pat Cummins: First the Allan Border Medal, next the captaincy

TB, you’ve got me very wrong. I’m a fan of treating every ball with what it deserves, and these days in both ODIs, and T20s, so much half-track rubbish is bowled, there should be more fours, and sixes, the bowlers are just asking to be trashed.
I would expect in a World Cup more movement and a fuller length that demands ticking the scoreboard over with ones, twos, and threes, and there’s bound to be the odd trash delivery to the boundary, or over it.
On that basis, 12 runs an over are very gettable often off the quicks, but I expect the spinners to play a bigger role in the World Cup, and as a general rule they bowl less trash.
Having said that, six an over is still very gettable in ones, twos, and the odd four.
After all, six an over gets you 300.

If Glenn Maxwell and Marcus Stoinis fire, Australia will win another World Cup

TB, how a team scores runs never changes, keeping the scoreboard ticking over with one, twos, and threes, with the bonuses of fours, and sixes, beats the daylights out of the hero batsmen who invariably depart early trying to make fours, and sixes, their bread and butter.

If Glenn Maxwell and Marcus Stoinis fire, Australia will win another World Cup

jamesb, I haven’t said Maxwell and Stoinis are the keys, they are the big bonus when they fire, and if they do that in England, Australia will win a sixth World Cup.
My keys are the two obvious batsmen on return – Steve Smith, and David Warner.

If Glenn Maxwell and Marcus Stoinis fire, Australia will win another World Cup

In case you missed the point G Knight, the two are totally different columns, this one pitting Australia’s two top ODI averages against how the current two blasters are firing.
Glenn Maxwell, and Marcus Stoinis, need to take a leaf out of the Michael Bevan-Michael Hussey book to realise their undoubted potential.

If Glenn Maxwell and Marcus Stoinis fire, Australia will win another World Cup

Peter, you want to talk strike rates, who would you rather have in your side?
Michael Bevan with 6912 career runs, a career average of 53.58, and SR of 74.16.
Mike Hussey’s career 5442, career average 48.15, and SR of 87.16.
Or
Glenn Maxwell’s career 2327, career average 32.32, and SR of 121.64.
Marcus Stoinis’ career 807, career average 42.47, and SR of 96.87.

If Glenn Maxwell and Marcus Stoinis fire, Australia will win another World Cup

You just refuse to get the message TonyH, Tom Brady is playing as high as he can go, with no international American football.

Are there any Australian footballers to rival quarterback Tom Brady's longevity in the NFL?

TonyH, let’s just stick to the facts, Tom Brady isn’t a dual international, and Leicester-Qld Country aren’t internationals.

Are there any Australian footballers to rival quarterback Tom Brady's longevity in the NFL?

liquorbox, Charles Haley was 32, well short of Tom Brady’s 41, when he played in the fifth of his five Super Bowls.
Haley’s five from five Super Bowls is also well short of Brady’s six from nine, and Haley’s no Bowl MVPs to Brady’s four is a no-brainer.

Are there any Australian footballers to rival quarterback Tom Brady's longevity in the NFL?

JamesH, you have nailed the comparisons right on the button.

Can’t agree with quarterbacks not copping the same level of impact. Being sacked wouldn’t be pleasant, especially as they are generally off-balance at the time, but it’s the very late tackles, well after the ball’s been delivered, that would be worse, and those are by far the vast majority in every game.

Are there any Australian footballers to rival quarterback Tom Brady's longevity in the NFL?

Repeat, how many Super Bowls did Blanda play in, and how many rings did he win?

Are there any Australian footballers to rival quarterback Tom Brady's longevity in the NFL?

Tony, Brad Thorn was indeed a great dual-code footballer, but he’s a Kiwi, this column compares Australians with Tom Brady.

Besides, Thorn was 36 when he last played for the All Blacks, younger than Tony Miller, and was only 23 when he last played for the Kangaroos.

Are there any Australian footballers to rival quarterback Tom Brady's longevity in the NFL?

steve, you miss the point too, the column is about age, longevity, and success. Nobody will come within a binocular distance of Tom Brady, yet the Australians named are the oldest to achieve their records in their sports.

Are there any Australian footballers to rival quarterback Tom Brady's longevity in the NFL?

BA, you miss the point, how many Super Bowl rings did George Blanda win?

Are there any Australian footballers to rival quarterback Tom Brady's longevity in the NFL?

Last call from me, of course batsmen have been struck, but there’s obviously far less chance of being hit on the head by keeping your eyes open and watching the path of the ball, than ducking front on, and hoping like hell you won’t be hit at all.

Batsmen must realise helmets are not impregnable

Suggesting batsmen should turn front on instead of sideways is not only disgraceful, but ignorant of what serious damage you are inviting.
Your suggestion is fingers crossed the helmet saves the batsman from brain damage, even death. That’s another form of Russian roulette.
If a batsman kept his eyes open watching the path of the ball, he can duck, or weave, and never be struck on the head.
There’s only one safe alternative, and it’s not yours.

Batsmen must realise helmets are not impregnable

You did Freo.

Batsmen must realise helmets are not impregnable

Sigh as much as you like, I’m far removed from being paranoid, you just don’t con me for a nano-second, and I’ll always call you out when you’re over the top like today.

Normally I just leave you alone in your own little world of stirring.

Batsmen must realise helmets are not impregnable

El Loco, and Paul, don’t fall into the usual CtD trap. His dig at me was for giving advice from the safety of my living room, he hasn’t given any advice, then condecendingly added – “but still, a bit of training in this area might save some lives”.

Batsmen must realise helmets are not impregnable