The Roar
The Roar

David Lord

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Joined February 2011

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David Lord spends his waking hours keeping abreast of what’s happening in the world of sport around the world and is one of the pre-eminent voices on sport in Australia. David has been deeply involved in two of the biggest sporting stories - with World Series Cricket in 1977 and professional rugby in 1983. In those early days of WSC, David was managing Jeff Thomson and Vivian Richards. Withdrawing “Thommo” from the original WSC ended up in the High Court of England, described by David as “not a top tourist resort”. In 1983 he signed 208 of the best rugby players from Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and France to play an international pro circuit. The concept didn’t get off the ground, but it did force the IRB to get cracking and bring in the World Rugby Cup, now one of the world’s great sporting spectacles every four years.

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Which last game DF, the 11 he scored against the Heat in the BBL, or the nine and 10 he managed in his last Test against India – all up 30 runs, average 10?

Is there light at the end of Australia's ODI tunnel?

Morning Paul, and after the first ODI loss at the SCG, India will make it a darn side hotter.

Is there light at the end of Australia's ODI tunnel?

Fionn, you clearly missed my friendly dig when you first mentioned Rafa, Fed, and Nadal as Murray’s toughest opponents – Nadal got two mentions, Novak missed out.

Andy Murray must hang on until Wimbledon before he retires

Fionn, even if Stan Wawrinka wins another Slam which would be a miracle, he’ll still be two Olympic gold medals behind Andy Murray, which Wawrinka will never win.

And with respect, the Scot as you say battled throughout his career with Rafa, Fed, and Nadal. What happened to Novak, his Achilles heel?

Andy Murray must hang on until Wimbledon before he retires

Possibly so Spanner, but it’s a pretty safe bet I’ve seen a lot more live cricket over a longer period than you, and when something that’s written is wrong, I’ll correct it.

Jhye Richardson and Jason Behrendorff paper over the Australian selection and tactical cracks

Paul, you can’t have it both ways that Dhoni and Sharma showed how to rotate the strike, and Finch’s pressure through field placings.

Australia faced 139 dot balls, India 165.

Australia cracked 132 runs in boundaries – 24×4, 6×6, India 110 with 17×4, 7×6.

Jhye Richardson and Jason Behrendorff paper over the Australian selection and tactical cracks

Harsh on Stoinis Andrew? Here are some of his stats en route – 6 off 12, 10 off 20, 21 off 26, 25 off 32, 36 off 39, and only hit credit at the death with 47 off 43. For the vast majority of his dig Stoinis was locked in first gear.

Jhye Richardson and Jason Behrendorff paper over the Australian selection and tactical cracks

Nick, I’ve only played, or covered, cricket for 73 years, long before Channel 9 ever telecast cricket, and in all that time sixes, and maximums, both described over the fence, long before ropes.

Jhye Richardson and Jason Behrendorff paper over the Australian selection and tactical cracks

England is number one.

Jhye Richardson and Jason Behrendorff paper over the Australian selection and tactical cracks

Guffaw all you damn well like DF, in this Australian squad Billy Stanlake IS the senior strike bowler,

Jhye Richardson and Jason Behrendorff paper over the Australian selection and tactical cracks

You still don’t get it TB:

(1) If The Don didn’t score as many runs, he wouldn’t have averaged 99.94.

(2) He would never have replaced Hobbs, Sutcliffe, nor Hutton, but followed them at three. And because Hammond and Compton would have followed The Don at four and five, scoring more runs than the Australian counterparts, it stands to reason The Don wouldn’t have scored as many runs, again making it impossible to average 99.94.

At least you have recognised that Flintoff and co weren’t as good as Anderson and Broad, which begs the question why did you post it in the first place?

Jimmy Anderson and Stuart Broad poised to set an impressive record

The Bush, what a ridiculous comment that Anderson and Broad wouldn’t have had such long careers if they were Australian, what on earth has that got to do with their careers?

“If” doesn’t count, they are English.

Why don’t you pose the equally stupid question would Don Bradman have been so prolific had he been an Englishman?

If Jack Hobbs (up to 1930) and Herbert Sutcliffe (up to 1935) opened for England averaging 56.95 and 60.73 respectively, TheDon would have waited a lot longer to bat.

If Len Hutton (1937 to 1955) averaging 56.67, took over opening from Hobbs, The Don would still have had to wait longer.

If Wally Hammond (1927 to 1947, averaging 58.45) batted four, and Denis Compton (1937 to 1957, averaging 50.06), batted five, The Don wouldn’t have had as much of the strike.

Bottom line TB, who gives a stuff.

As for your “great” English bowlers Andrew Flintoff (226 wickets at 32.78), Harrison, obviously Steve Harmison (222 at 31.94), Jeff Jones (44 at 40.20), and Matthew Hoggard (248 at 30.50), none of their careers were anywhere near those of Jimmy Anderson, and Stuart Broad.

Jimmy Anderson and Stuart Broad poised to set an impressive record

Dan Ced, the same was said of Norm O’Neill, Doug Walters, Ricky Ponting, and David Boon, but that quality quartet proved the selectors were right on the money for recognising them early.

Just let Will Pucovski be Will Pucovski

DaveJ, the difference is Will Pucovski goes big far more often than those who want to, but can’t.

Just let Will Pucovski be Will Pucovski

Paul, I sincerely hope Cricket Australia gets no closer to the young bloke than the top deck of the stand.

Just let Will Pucovski be Will Pucovski

Totally correct Jeff, but different horses for different courses. Cricket traditionally has three, and sometimes as many as five national selectors, but a captain and coach should never be one of them as explained above. Captains and coaches are consulted by selectors, but the ultimate decisions are left to the panel. Rarely are cricket coaches sacked, they see out their contract, and if successful they sign another contract. The four football codes are very different, their whole existence relies on success, and as you well know, the sacking rate is high in all four. That being the case football coaches must be sole selectors, their very livelihood depends on their decisions, and subsequent results. Having said that, I’m very pleased with the appointment of Scott Johnson as director of rugby, a dramatic change in Australian rugby tradition since professionalism. But it is a positive step in the right direction in the current climate, as is the fact he’ll be a Wallaby selector as well, with a third yet to be named, hopefully Rod Macqueen. Under the old setup, Cheika had to be sole selector, as I never envisaged Rugby Australia would have the balls to move on a director of rugby.

Justin Langer should stand down as a national selector

DP, you have valid grounds complaining of the number of chances Mitchell Marsh has been given, but no grounds claiming Glenn Maxwell has knuckled down to the selections wishes, made good runs, and the selectors don’t pick him. When was that, apart from the odd one-off, he’s never had a run of good scores playing sensible cricket. Forget the x-factor, selectors will only look at Maxwell when he bats responsibly, using his massive natural talent to become an automatic first choice selection every Test.

Has Joe Burns become invisible to Australia's selectors?

Ben, Glenn Maxwell has been his own worst enemy throughout his career. Read Steve Smith’s stats above at the same time as Maxwell, with two less digs, and Maxwell has more natural ability. But patience is one of Smith’s assets, while Maxwell has little to none of that commodity. As for Travis Head, he has far less natural ability than Maxwell, but has scored more runs than Maxwell in three less digs. Let me tell you Ben, there are literally thousands of kids around Australia, and plenty of adults, who would love to have Maxwell’s ability and would never ever abuse it. Hopefully it’s not too late for Maxwell to prove himself for the benefit of all.

Has Joe Burns become invisible to Australia's selectors?

Paul, most significant reason is not ALL.

Cheteshwar Pujara is a one-man demolition unit

Paul, the evidence is very visible with not one Australian century in four Tests and 35 reaching 20, but only eight cracked 50-plus – very un-Australian. Even more apparent in this SCG Test the six Australian dismissals on day three were all victims of self-destruction. Throw in the dropped catches in the series, and the slow to react chances, plus the number of deliveries that have aimlessly gone through to keeper Paine, and it’s little wonder the Australians are well-beaten in this series. That’s mental disintegration in my book, they are much better cricketers than what we’ve seen.

Cheteshwar Pujara is a one-man demolition unit

sheek, Ross Cullen would have been far better off belting his opponent and being sent off than biting his ear. Cullen could have fought his case in a judicial hearing, and even if found guilty would have maybe copped two or three games suspension, but stayed on tour. A judicial hearing would also have placed future referees on tour to look for boring. But biting was, and is, inexcusable, and deserving of an early flight home.

Australian rugby loses one of the greats as Wallaby legend John Thornett dies, aged 83

sheek, Jon White was always loose-head, and won that position in the Wallaby Team of the Century, an all-time rugby great, and great bloke, who has long been acclaimed as an artist of note, with landscapes his specialty. He’s still going strong at 83.

Australian rugby loses one of the greats as Wallaby legend John Thornett dies, aged 83

Thank you Julie, your Dad thoroughly deserved to be saluted as a great bloke, and a quality cricketer, there was never a dull moment when “Blinks” was around. He will be sorely missed by those privileged to know him, and we genuinely feel for you. and your family.

Billy 'Blinks' Watson dies, aged 87

Good morning sheek, Bill McLaughlin was on a hiding-to-nothing after the Ross Cullen ear-biting incident in just the third of a 36-game tour that started on 19 October 1966, and ended on 18 February 1967. With the brutal British press baying for blood, McLaughlin had no option but to send second-string hooker Cullen home on the next flight out, or face a daily press bashing that would have killed the tour stone dead with nearly four months to go. In those totally amateur days the Wallaby manager was the most powerful man on tour, with the assistant manager, not even called coach in Alan Roper, the second most powerful. Captain John Thornett, and vice-captain Ken Catchpole, had no say at all.

Australian rugby loses one of the greats as Wallaby legend John Thornett dies, aged 83

Internal Fixation, your basketball example if self-penalising, if you miss the three pointer the opposition can score up to three points at the other end – a six-point penalty. My argument is Glenn Maxwell with his trick shots and lack of patience, has cost him a place among the greats. Nobody comes within cooee of The Don, but Maxwell has the same natural ability as Ricky Ponting, but only a fraction of applying it, and Maxwell has more natural ability than both Steve Waugh, and Allan Border, but only a fraction of Waugh’s determination to succeed, and Border’s doggedness to make the most of what he was given. As a result, The Don. Ponting, Waugh, and Border are legends – Maxwell is just making up the numbers. And that Internal Fixation, is a bloody tragic waste of talent.

Cricket Australia should ban all trick shots