The Roar
The Roar

Daniel Jeffrey

Editor

Joined January 2016

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Daniel is The Roar's Editor.

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Yes, that and what they do at 10 will be key, Oz

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Cheers Jeff

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

Arsonists lighting fires is unfortunately nothing new. The extreme weather conditions which have exacerbated the scale and severity of this fire season are, and are a product of climate change.

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

Yes, because in my article I clearly stated that CA creating a climate policy will solve everything.

Come on Phil, of course it won’t, but no individual factor will be a solution on its own. With an issue of this magnitude, everyone needs to step up. That can and should include sporting bodies.

As for your claim about these fires not being unprecendted, I might take the word of Greg Mullins, former NSW Fire and Rescue Commissioner, over yours:

“If anyone tells you, ‘This is part of a normal cycle’ or ‘We’ve had fires like this before’, smile politely and walk away, because they don’t know what they’re talking about.”

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

Too kind, Lewis

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

Cheers Zak

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

I’d suspected it would, but really, really, really hoped it wouldn’t.

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

I quite clearly outlined why I feel the need to have this discussion in this context at the end of the article, Micko. Given you’ve either not read it or ignored it, I don’t see much point in continuing a conversation with you.

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

You’re under no obligation to care about what I think Micko, yet here you are reading and commenting on the piece.

As for why this topic belongs on a sports site, I explained that in the article.

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

If you can’t tell it’s my opinion when it’s published under my name with the word “opinion” plastered above the headline, there’s not a lot I can do for you.

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

Yeah. That’s me: I’m the Editor of The Roar. What’s your point?

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

Cheers Spruce. Final Word’s always a good listen, Geoff and Adam do a terrific job with it.

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

That’s completely untrue, Ian. I wrote this piece of my own volition in my own time while on leave.

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

Ever come across a link on the internet Justin? We underline them so everyone knows that, by clicking on those words, you’ll be taken to a different page or site.

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

Not a climate expert, only someone who believes the scientific consensus on it. As stated in the piece, I believe CA should have a climate policy. Something based on recommendations from climate science experts.

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

It’s quite obviously a conflict of interest to be working for a mining company and simultaneously publishing work which denies the human impact on climate change.

Mann was never proven to be fraudulent – far from it. He was accused of scientific fraud by climate science deniers and subsequently cleared of any scientific malpractice following a four-month investigation. In fact, Mann was the recent recipient of an apology from a publication which ran an interview claiming his work was fraudulent, after he took that publication to court.

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

To each their own, Paul. I understand where you’re coming from, only believe that sport has a responsibility to deal with an issue this significant. After all, it’s already having, and it will continue to have more of, an impact on sport.

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

Also, when did virtue become something to aspire away from?

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

Of course sport – and cricket – contributes to carbon emissions. To borrow a paragraph from Geoff Lemon:

Cricket “keeps churning through resources. Not just the water for grounds or willow for bats or power for floodlights. The mountains of garbage left at stadiums. The thousands of cars ferrying people to watch. The hundreds of thousands of domestic and international flights carrying teams and families and support staff between series, players between the multitude of leagues, press boxes full of media and bays full of supporters along on tours.”

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

As I said in the article, Bigbaz, the notion sport exists in some kind of bubble isolated from climate change is rubbish. It’s being affected by it, and will continue to be. As such, sports should be working on ways to meet that challenge.

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

Much appreciated, Roger

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

Ian Plimer. That’d be the bloke who’s been a director or sat on the board of a number of mining companies, and had an article fact-checked by five other scientists who concluded it made “a number of verifiably false claims about climate science and energy systems as the foundation of that argument.

“Scientists who reviewed the article found that it repeated common false claims about climate science, stating that human greenhouse gas emissions are trivial and not responsible for current climate change, for example. These claims are contradicted by the available evidence and decades of published scientific research.”

Heaven and Earth has also been roundly criticised. Bob Ward, for example (a former director of public relations and policy at Lord Nicholas Stern’s Grantham Institute at the London School of Economics) labeled it “full of inaccurate statements and misrepresentations of global temperature data”. and Plimer refused to answer a number of questions about the accuracy of the book.

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

Hi enoughisenough. 2019 was, actually, the hottest year in Australian history, a record which was contributed to by climate change, according to a number of climate scientists.

Can you tell me what scientists you’re basing your belief on? I’m genuinely quite curious.

Time for sport to realise climate change is its fight, too

Cheers Harry. A pleasure to put this one together for you.

Winning in Tokyo: Finding the sun